Religion, Faith, and Spirituality : Reincarnation is a concept for demons/djinn. They can shapeshift and respawn.

Reincarnation is a concept for demons/djinn. They can shapeshift and respawn.

Resurrection is for humans.

let me smell your farts for israel

Re: Reincarnation is a concept for demons/djinn. They can shapeshift and respawn

Reincarnation is a concept for demons/djinn. They can shapeshift and respawn.

Resurrection is for humans.

Hinduism/Buddhism/Jainism/… is a religion of the demons/djinn basically

They have longer lifespans. Hence their Gods being here for millions of years, billions.

let me smell your farts for israel

Re: Reincarnation is a concept for demons/djinn. They can shapeshift and respawn

Down syndrome or Down's syndrome, also known as trisomy 21, is a genetic disorder caused by the presence of all or part of a third copy of chromosome 21.[2] It is usually associated with physical growth delays, mild to moderate intellectual disability, and characteristic facial features.[1] The average IQ of a young adult with Down syndrome is 50, equivalent to the mental ability of an 8- or 9-year-old child, but this can vary widely.[8]

The parents of the affected individual are usually genetically normal.[12] The probability increases from less than 0.1% in 20-year-old mothers to 3% in those of age 45.[3] The extra chromosome is believed to occur by chance, with no known behavioral activity or environmental factor that changes the probability.[13] Down syndrome can be identified during pregnancy by prenatal screening followed by diagnostic testing or after birth by direct observation and genetic testing.[5] Since the introduction of screening, pregnancies with the diagnosis are often terminated.[14][15] Regular screening for health problems common in Down syndrome is recommended throughout the person's life.[8]

There is no cure for Down syndrome.[16] Education and proper care have been shown to improve quality of life.[6] Some children with Down syndrome are educated in typical school classes, while others require more specialized education.[7] Some individuals with Down syndrome graduate from high school, and a few attend post-secondary education.[17] In adulthood, about 20% in the United States do paid work in some capacity,[18] with many requiring a sheltered work environment.[7] Support in financial and legal matters is often needed.[9] Life expectancy is around 50 to 60 years in the developed world with proper health care.[8][9]

Down syndrome is the most common chromosome abnormality in humans.[8] It occurs in about 1 in 1,000 babies born each year.[1] In 2015, Down syndrome was present in 5.4 million individuals globally and resulted in 27,000 deaths, down from 43,000 deaths in 1990.[10][11][19] It is named after British doctor John Langdon Down, who fully described the syndrome in 1866.[20] Some aspects of the condition were described earlier by French psychiatrist Jean-Étienne Dominique Esquirol in 1838 and French physician Édouard Séguin in 1844.[21] The genetic cause of Down syndrome was discovered in 1959.[20]
Down syndrome is caused by having three copies of the genes on chromosome 21, rather than the usual two.[2][63] The parents of the affected individual are typically genetically normal.[12] Those who have one child with Down syndrome have about a 1% risk of having a second child with the syndrome, if both parents are found to have normal karyotypes.[61]

The extra chromosome content can arise through several different ways. The most common cause (about 92–95% of cases) is a complete extra copy of chromosome 21, resulting in trisomy 21.[62][64] In 1.0 to 2.5% of cases, some of the cells in the body are normal and others have trisomy 21, known as mosaic Down syndrome.[61][65] The other common mechanisms that can give rise to Down syndrome include: a Robertsonian translocation, isochromosome, or ring chromosome. These contain additional material from chromosome 21 and occur in about 2.5% of cases.[20][61] An isochromosome results when the two long arms of a chromosome separate together rather than the long and short arm separating together during egg or sperm development.[62]

The extra genetic material present in Down syndrome results in overexpression of a portion of the 310 genes located on chromosome 21.[63] This overexpression has been estimated at around 50%, due to the third copy of the chromosome present.[61] Some research has suggested the Down syndrome critical region is located at bands 21q22.1–q22.3,[73] with this area including genes for amyloid, superoxide dismutase, and likely the ETS2 proto oncogene.[74] Other research, however, has not confirmed these findings.[63] microRNAs are also proposed to be involved.[75]

The dementia that occurs in Down syndrome is due to an excess of amyloid beta peptide produced in the brain and is similar to Alzheimer's disease, which also involves amyloid beta build-up.[76] Amyloid beta is processed from amyloid precursor protein, the gene for which is located on chromosome 21.[76] Senile plaques and neurofibrillary tangles are present in nearly all by 35 years of age, though dementia may not be present.[12] Those with Down syndrome also lack a normal number of lymphocytes and produce less antibodies which contributes to their increased risk of infection.[20]

Beware the sound of one hand clapping.

Re: Reincarnation is a concept for demons/djinn. They can shapeshift and respawn

So these are your true beliefs then you pretend to be an atheist, nimda dear?

Hrabak is nothing but an incestuous, shit eating goat fucking jew.

Re: Reincarnation is a concept for demons/djinn. They can shapeshift and respawn

Down syndrome or Down's syndrome, also known as trisomy 21, is a genetic disorder caused by the presence of all or part of a third copy of chromosome 21.[2] It is usually associated with physical growth delays, mild to moderate intellectual disability, and characteristic facial features.[1] The average IQ of a young adult with Down syndrome is 50, equivalent to the mental ability of an 8- or 9-year-old child, but this can vary widely.[8]

The parents of the affected individual are usually genetically normal.[12] The probability increases from less than 0.1% in 20-year-old mothers to 3% in those of age 45.[3] The extra chromosome is believed to occur by chance, with no known behavioral activity or environmental factor that changes the probability.[13] Down syndrome can be identified during pregnancy by prenatal screening followed by diagnostic testing or after birth by direct observation and genetic testing.[5] Since the introduction of screening, pregnancies with the diagnosis are often terminated.[14][15] Regular screening for health problems common in Down syndrome is recommended throughout the person's life.[8]

There is no cure for Down syndrome.[16] Education and proper care have been shown to improve quality of life.[6] Some children with Down syndrome are educated in typical school classes, while others require more specialized education.[7] Some individuals with Down syndrome graduate from high school, and a few attend post-secondary education.[17] In adulthood, about 20% in the United States do paid work in some capacity,[18] with many requiring a sheltered work environment.[7] Support in financial and legal matters is often needed.[9] Life expectancy is around 50 to 60 years in the developed world with proper health care.[8][9]

Down syndrome is the most common chromosome abnormality in humans.[8] It occurs in about 1 in 1,000 babies born each year.[1] In 2015, Down syndrome was present in 5.4 million individuals globally and resulted in 27,000 deaths, down from 43,000 deaths in 1990.[10][11][19] It is named after British doctor John Langdon Down, who fully described the syndrome in 1866.[20] Some aspects of the condition were described earlier by French psychiatrist Jean-Étienne Dominique Esquirol in 1838 and French physician Édouard Séguin in 1844.[21] The genetic cause of Down syndrome was discovered in 1959.[20]
Down syndrome is caused by having three copies of the genes on chromosome 21, rather than the usual two.[2][63] The parents of the affected individual are typically genetically normal.[12] Those who have one child with Down syndrome have about a 1% risk of having a second child with the syndrome, if both parents are found to have normal karyotypes.[61]

The extra chromosome content can arise through several different ways. The most common cause (about 92–95% of cases) is a complete extra copy of chromosome 21, resulting in trisomy 21.[62][64] In 1.0 to 2.5% of cases, some of the cells in the body are normal and others have trisomy 21, known as mosaic Down syndrome.[61][65] The other common mechanisms that can give rise to Down syndrome include: a Robertsonian translocation, isochromosome, or ring chromosome. These contain additional material from chromosome 21 and occur in about 2.5% of cases.[20][61] An isochromosome results when the two long arms of a chromosome separate together rather than the long and short arm separating together during egg or sperm development.[62]

The extra genetic material present in Down syndrome results in overexpression of a portion of the 310 genes located on chromosome 21.[63] This overexpression has been estimated at around 50%, due to the third copy of the chromosome present.[61] Some research has suggested the Down syndrome critical region is located at bands 21q22.1–q22.3,[73] with this area including genes for amyloid, superoxide dismutase, and likely the ETS2 proto oncogene.[74] Other research, however, has not confirmed these findings.[63] microRNAs are also proposed to be involved.[75]

The dementia that occurs in Down syndrome is due to an excess of amyloid beta peptide produced in the brain and is similar to Alzheimer's disease, which also involves amyloid beta build-up.[76] Amyloid beta is processed from amyloid precursor protein, the gene for which is located on chromosome 21.[76] Senile plaques and neurofibrillary tangles are present in nearly all by 35 years of age, though dementia may not be present.[12] Those with Down syndrome also lack a normal number of lymphocytes and produce less antibodies which contributes to their increased risk of infection.[20]

Beware the sound of one hand clapping.

Re: Reincarnation is a concept for demons/djinn. They can shapeshift and respawn

you stupid, stupid little anti-semite cocksucker.

ok nimda dear.

FTR i was prosemitic and still am. I am the only person in the world who can build the third temple within our lifetimes.

you turn me antisemitic.

Hrabak is nothing but an incestuous, shit eating goat fucking jew.

Re: Reincarnation is a concept for demons/djinn. They can shapeshift and respawn

Down syndrome or Down's syndrome, also known as trisomy 21, is a genetic disorder caused by the presence of all or part of a third copy of chromosome 21.[2] It is usually associated with physical growth delays, mild to moderate intellectual disability, and characteristic facial features.[1] The average IQ of a young adult with Down syndrome is 50, equivalent to the mental ability of an 8- or 9-year-old child, but this can vary widely.[8]

The parents of the affected individual are usually genetically normal.[12] The probability increases from less than 0.1% in 20-year-old mothers to 3% in those of age 45.[3] The extra chromosome is believed to occur by chance, with no known behavioral activity or environmental factor that changes the probability.[13] Down syndrome can be identified during pregnancy by prenatal screening followed by diagnostic testing or after birth by direct observation and genetic testing.[5] Since the introduction of screening, pregnancies with the diagnosis are often terminated.[14][15] Regular screening for health problems common in Down syndrome is recommended throughout the person's life.[8]

There is no cure for Down syndrome.[16] Education and proper care have been shown to improve quality of life.[6] Some children with Down syndrome are educated in typical school classes, while others require more specialized education.[7] Some individuals with Down syndrome graduate from high school, and a few attend post-secondary education.[17] In adulthood, about 20% in the United States do paid work in some capacity,[18] with many requiring a sheltered work environment.[7] Support in financial and legal matters is often needed.[9] Life expectancy is around 50 to 60 years in the developed world with proper health care.[8][9]

Down syndrome is the most common chromosome abnormality in humans.[8] It occurs in about 1 in 1,000 babies born each year.[1] In 2015, Down syndrome was present in 5.4 million individuals globally and resulted in 27,000 deaths, down from 43,000 deaths in 1990.[10][11][19] It is named after British doctor John Langdon Down, who fully described the syndrome in 1866.[20] Some aspects of the condition were described earlier by French psychiatrist Jean-Étienne Dominique Esquirol in 1838 and French physician Édouard Séguin in 1844.[21] The genetic cause of Down syndrome was discovered in 1959.[20]
Down syndrome is caused by having three copies of the genes on chromosome 21, rather than the usual two.[2][63] The parents of the affected individual are typically genetically normal.[12] Those who have one child with Down syndrome have about a 1% risk of having a second child with the syndrome, if both parents are found to have normal karyotypes.[61]

The extra chromosome content can arise through several different ways. The most common cause (about 92–95% of cases) is a complete extra copy of chromosome 21, resulting in trisomy 21.[62][64] In 1.0 to 2.5% of cases, some of the cells in the body are normal and others have trisomy 21, known as mosaic Down syndrome.[61][65] The other common mechanisms that can give rise to Down syndrome include: a Robertsonian translocation, isochromosome, or ring chromosome. These contain additional material from chromosome 21 and occur in about 2.5% of cases.[20][61] An isochromosome results when the two long arms of a chromosome separate together rather than the long and short arm separating together during egg or sperm development.[62]

The extra genetic material present in Down syndrome results in overexpression of a portion of the 310 genes located on chromosome 21.[63] This overexpression has been estimated at around 50%, due to the third copy of the chromosome present.[61] Some research has suggested the Down syndrome critical region is located at bands 21q22.1–q22.3,[73] with this area including genes for amyloid, superoxide dismutase, and likely the ETS2 proto oncogene.[74] Other research, however, has not confirmed these findings.[63] microRNAs are also proposed to be involved.[75]

The dementia that occurs in Down syndrome is due to an excess of amyloid beta peptide produced in the brain and is similar to Alzheimer's disease, which also involves amyloid beta build-up.[76] Amyloid beta is processed from amyloid precursor protein, the gene for which is located on chromosome 21.[76] Senile plaques and neurofibrillary tangles are present in nearly all by 35 years of age, though dementia may not be present.[12] Those with Down syndrome also lack a normal number of lymphocytes and produce less antibodies which contributes to their increased risk of infection.[20]

Beware the sound of one hand clapping.

Re: Reincarnation is a concept for demons/djinn. They can shapeshift and respawn

I am so down syndromed i try to grow potatos like eggie on sand.

Hrabak is nothing but an incestuous, shit eating goat fucking jew.

Re: Reincarnation is a concept for demons/djinn. They can shapeshift and respawn

Down syndrome or Down's syndrome, also known as trisomy 21, is a genetic disorder caused by the presence of all or part of a third copy of chromosome 21.[2] It is usually associated with physical growth delays, mild to moderate intellectual disability, and characteristic facial features.[1] The average IQ of a young adult with Down syndrome is 50, equivalent to the mental ability of an 8- or 9-year-old child, but this can vary widely.[8]

The parents of the affected individual are usually genetically normal.[12] The probability increases from less than 0.1% in 20-year-old mothers to 3% in those of age 45.[3] The extra chromosome is believed to occur by chance, with no known behavioral activity or environmental factor that changes the probability.[13] Down syndrome can be identified during pregnancy by prenatal screening followed by diagnostic testing or after birth by direct observation and genetic testing.[5] Since the introduction of screening, pregnancies with the diagnosis are often terminated.[14][15] Regular screening for health problems common in Down syndrome is recommended throughout the person's life.[8]

There is no cure for Down syndrome.[16] Education and proper care have been shown to improve quality of life.[6] Some children with Down syndrome are educated in typical school classes, while others require more specialized education.[7] Some individuals with Down syndrome graduate from high school, and a few attend post-secondary education.[17] In adulthood, about 20% in the United States do paid work in some capacity,[18] with many requiring a sheltered work environment.[7] Support in financial and legal matters is often needed.[9] Life expectancy is around 50 to 60 years in the developed world with proper health care.[8][9]

Down syndrome is the most common chromosome abnormality in humans.[8] It occurs in about 1 in 1,000 babies born each year.[1] In 2015, Down syndrome was present in 5.4 million individuals globally and resulted in 27,000 deaths, down from 43,000 deaths in 1990.[10][11][19] It is named after British doctor John Langdon Down, who fully described the syndrome in 1866.[20] Some aspects of the condition were described earlier by French psychiatrist Jean-Étienne Dominique Esquirol in 1838 and French physician Édouard Séguin in 1844.[21] The genetic cause of Down syndrome was discovered in 1959.[20]
Down syndrome is caused by having three copies of the genes on chromosome 21, rather than the usual two.[2][63] The parents of the affected individual are typically genetically normal.[12] Those who have one child with Down syndrome have about a 1% risk of having a second child with the syndrome, if both parents are found to have normal karyotypes.[61]

The extra chromosome content can arise through several different ways. The most common cause (about 92–95% of cases) is a complete extra copy of chromosome 21, resulting in trisomy 21.[62][64] In 1.0 to 2.5% of cases, some of the cells in the body are normal and others have trisomy 21, known as mosaic Down syndrome.[61][65] The other common mechanisms that can give rise to Down syndrome include: a Robertsonian translocation, isochromosome, or ring chromosome. These contain additional material from chromosome 21 and occur in about 2.5% of cases.[20][61] An isochromosome results when the two long arms of a chromosome separate together rather than the long and short arm separating together during egg or sperm development.[62]

The extra genetic material present in Down syndrome results in overexpression of a portion of the 310 genes located on chromosome 21.[63] This overexpression has been estimated at around 50%, due to the third copy of the chromosome present.[61] Some research has suggested the Down syndrome critical region is located at bands 21q22.1–q22.3,[73] with this area including genes for amyloid, superoxide dismutase, and likely the ETS2 proto oncogene.[74] Other research, however, has not confirmed these findings.[63] microRNAs are also proposed to be involved.[75]

The dementia that occurs in Down syndrome is due to an excess of amyloid beta peptide produced in the brain and is similar to Alzheimer's disease, which also involves amyloid beta build-up.[76] Amyloid beta is processed from amyloid precursor protein, the gene for which is located on chromosome 21.[76] Senile plaques and neurofibrillary tangles are present in nearly all by 35 years of age, though dementia may not be present.[12] Those with Down syndrome also lack a normal number of lymphocytes and produce less antibodies which contributes to their increased risk of infection.[20]

Beware the sound of one hand clapping.
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