Commercials/Advertising : Positive/Negative Product Placement

Positive/Negative Product Placement

Before noticing this category under Genre Zone, I had started (or revived) the topic of product placement under Film General:

http://www.imdb.com/board/bd0000007/flat/162528334?p=1

They are getting sneakier and more subliminal all the time. Recently, Letterman mentioned Hydrox and Oreo cookies in a negative context as compared to his mom's home baking. Then he turned it around and confessed that he ate nearly an entire package of Oreos at one sitting.

This raises the question of Negative Product Placement. What about Conan repeatedly linking Taco Bell to diarrhea in his monologs? Does insulting a product endear the brand to the public because they are good sports about it and don't sue? Does the mere mention, even when unflattering, constitute a valid plug?

Re: Product Placement

Katie Holmes was on Letterman Tuesday night (September 7th) and told an amusing anecdote about appearing onstage in a revealing outfit and, absentmindedly, her chest smeared with Vicks VapoRub. When Dave asked her if it helped her cough, she replied in the affirmative. Can you say "free lifetime supply" of salve?

Re: Product Placement

Amy Yasbeck (John Ritter's widow)...Leno...Mon., Sept. 13...Starbucks

She was on the show to promote her newly published bio of her late husband and just happened to mention that "a lot of Starbucks" helped to her cope with a hectic schedule.

Re: Product Placement

"Judge Judy"

Burger King and Walmart were specifically mentioned as teen hangouts on a recent show.

Re: Product Placement

"The Tonight Show with Jay Leno" (last night: Friday, November 19, 2010)

Guest Garth Brooks told an "amusing" anecdote about one his daughters showing up late for a family night out and subsequently going to McDonald's instead of a nicer unnamed restaurant where they had made reservations.

Can you say, "lifetime supply of McRibs?"

Leno's guest on 11/16/20, Tom Felton of Harry Potter fame, made a positive refererence to Nike along with a negative mention of Adidas in practically the same breath. This verges on payola.

After moving to TBS, Conan continues to berate Taco Bell as a leading cause of loose bowels. I don't know how he avoids a lawsuit but maybe Taco Bell actually likes the joke. I never get tired of it.

Re: Product Placement

You're confusing typical conversation for product placement. I can assure you, none of these are "product placements." While a favorable mention might get a celeb some free gear, it's certainly not a predetermined conversational piece for advertising purposes.

Re: Product Placement

The product placement here makes the Subway plugs on Chuck, The Biggest Loser and Pawn Stars look like the pinnacle of subtlety:
http://tv.yahoo.com/blog/days-of-our-lives-gets-called-out-for-hilario usly-obvious-product-placement--1772

Re: Product Placement


The product placement here makes the Subway plugs on Chuck, The Biggest Loser and Pawn Stars look like the pinnacle of subtlety:
Up until now, hearing Ryan McPartlin having to sell a Toyota Sienna on "Chuck" felt like the most egregious offense.

By my god, those were bad!


---
The Force is strong with you, Smokey, but you haven't gotten the Bandit yet.

Charles Dickens: PP Pioneer?

Athough this is clearly a hoax, I do recall that Dickens' novels were published serially and there were probably ads included on separate pages. Being woven into the text like that is farfetched but you know that ye olde Truth is stranger than ye olde Fiction. I seems possible.

http://blog.seattlepi.com/booktryst/archives/220488.asp

Re: Product Placement

Rewatching NO COUNTRY FOR OLD MEN, I jotted down Texaco, Snickers, Ford (Granada), Dodge (Ram) and HBO (free at the motel). There were a couple of POV (point-of-view) shots of the Ford and Ram hood ornaments. I suppose that this was all worked out in a smoke-filled back room with the Coen brothers.

Re: Product Placement

Excuse me for bumping up my own topic. Tonight's "SNL" (Jan. 29, 2011) devoted a whole sketch to PP although the products mentioned were all fake. To me it was very funny but maybe I am biased because I've rarely missed a show in 35+ years.

Rachel Ray has her own graphics crew to conceal the labels on real store-bought products. I guess you could call that neutral product placement. Ironically, PBS's "America's Test Kitchen" not only displays actual brand names but recommends the best ones.

Re: Product Placement

It's not really ironic that America's Test Kitchen gives us name brands because that's what they do. They test things and tell us which ones are the best. However, since it's public television they don't take advertising from any of the products and aren't influenced that way. They're like Consumer Reports for the kitchen. So, it makes perfect sense that they give us name brands.

OT: We made a fantastic stuffing using one of their methods this past Thanksgiving that someone posted on the Food board. It used extra wings on top of the stuffing for extra juices. It was delicious!

The perfect human being is uninteresting. -Joseph Campbell

{Ignore phone posting errors.}

Re: Product Placement

On the Monday night's (April 18, 2011) "Conan" show, guest Emma Roberts mentioned that as a young girl she wished she could be in a Pop-Tarts TV commercial because it looked like fun. My guess is that she at least received one full case of the product for her backhanded endorsement.

Re: Product Placement

Safe House (1998), a made-for-TV movie starring Patrick Stewart, is riddled with product placements. In no particular order, here are just a few:

Pop-Tarts
Cuisinart
Sony
Zachy Farms
Multicolor Post-It Notes
Coca-Cola
Twinkies
Casio
Cap'n Crunch
Travel & Leisure magazine
Del Monte
Jaguar
S&W
Winchell's (doughnuts)

Roger Ebert doesn't generally review made-for-TV movies so I'll give it my personal thumb up despite its predictability.

Re: Product Placement

There is a lengthy discourse about product placement in "Seinfeld" at Wikipedia but it doesn't really resolve whether this was all paid advertising or merely the use of real-world props.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Seinfeld


A recurring feature of Seinfeld was its use of specific products, especially candy, as plot points. These might be a central feature of a plot (e.g. Junior Mints, Twix, Jujyfruits, bite size Three Musketeers, Snickers, Nestlé Chunky, Oh Henry! and Pez), or an association of a candy with a guest character (e.g. Oh Henry! bars), or simply a conversational aside (e.g. Chuckles, Clark Bar, Twinkies).

Non-candy products featured in Seinfeld include Rold Gold pretzels (whose advertisements at the time featured Jason Alexander), Kenny Rogers Roasters (a chicken restaurant chain), Oreo Cookies, Triscuits, Ben & Jerry's, H&H Bagels, Baskin Robbins, Dockers, Drake's Coffee Cakes, Ring Dings, Pepsi, Mello Yello, Snapple, Clearly Canadian, Bosco Chocolate Syrup, Cadillac, Saab, Ford Escort, Tyler Chicken (a parody of Tyson Chicken), Specialized Bicycles, Nike, BMW, Volvo, Toyota, Tupperware, Calvin Klein, Klein Bicycles, Ovaltine, Yoo-hoo, Arby's, TV Guide, Trump Tower, Glide Floss, Gore-Tex, Entenmann's, J. Peterman clothing catalog, and the board games Risk, Boggle, Trivial Pursuit, Scrabble, and Battleship.

The computers shown in Jerry's apartment are Apple Macintosh and several different models were shown, although Jerry is only seen using his computer once during the entire show. Also seen throughout the show's run were many different brands of cereal, e.g. Cheerios. Notable exceptions to this pattern are a fictional scotch brand called "Hennigan's" (a portmanteau of "Hennessy" and "Brannigans") and a canned meat product called "Beef-a-reeno" (a parody of "Beef-a-roni"). Product placement, for Snapple, was inserted as a parody of product placement; when offered some by Elaine in the middle of a conversation, the character Babu Bhatt's (owner of a Pakistani restaurant named "Dream Cafe") brother declines, calling the drink "too fruity". A second time this product was mentioned is when Marla "the Virgin" is offered a Snapple by Elaine.

The show's creators claim that they were not engaging in a product placement strategy for commercial gain. One of the motivations for the use of real-world products, quite unrelated to commercial considerations, is the comedy value of funny-sounding phrases and words. "I knew I wanted Kramer to think of watching the operation like going to see a movie," explained Seinfeld writer/producer Andy Robin in an interview published in the Hollywood Reporter. "At first, I thought maybe a piece of popcorn falls into the patient. I ran that by my brother, and he said, 'No, Junior Mints are just funnier.'"
At the very least, the cast and crew probably got plenty of free samples.

Re: Product Placement


but it doesn't really resolve whether this was all paid advertising or merely the use of real-world props.
I've always been under the impression that they're props. The comedy just seems to have stemmed from the foodstuffs, rather than written around them. It also seems like Larry David's sense of humor to find humor in a particular article of food and then write a joke based on it.

Evil just messed with the wrong hombre.

Re: Product Placement

I've noticed a lot more product placement on The Closer lately. Seems to be tied in with their sponsors.

Re: Product Placement

This week Conan O'Brien introduced a new character named January Jones. His favorite chocolates are Toblerones. I think it's a safe bet that at least one free case of the product is on its way.

I haven't noticed any negative mentions of Taco Bell on Conan's show for awhile. It's been one of his favorite targets for bullying.

Positive/Negative Product Placement

The recent news about a woman offering sex in exchange for McDonald's Value Menu cheeseburgers and the subsequent jokes by Conan, Leno and Letterman seems like negative publicity at first glance but it could also be considered free national advertising for the chain. Burger King may be wishing that they could get a piece of the action (if you'll pardon the expression) too.

Re: Positive/Negative Product Placement

Jay Leno's recurring "Headlines" segment last night (4/9/12) included a quote in a local paper from a woman who said that she tried to eat a healthy diet but...whenever she noticed that the light was on at Krispy Kreme, indicating a fresh batch of doughnuts, she and her husband would pull in and polish off a dozen before they got home. I guess this could be both positive and negative publicity for the chain. I didn't know that Krispy Kreme had a signal light.

Re: Positive/Negative Product Placement

One, Two, Three (1961) starring James Cagney might be described as a 115 minute Coca-Cola commercial. The Russians try to steal the secret formula.

Trivia:

Joan Crawford (then on the board of PepsiCo) telephoned director Billy Wilder to protest the movie's Coca-Cola connection. Wilder then added a final scene in which James Cagney buys four bottles of Coke from a vending machine. The last bottle out of the machine isn't Coke but Pepsi.
http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0055256/trivia?tab=tr&item=tr0733915

Re: Positive/Negative Product Placement

Mommie Dearest (1981) features a large box of Cheerios prominently displayed on the Crawford breakfast table as daughter Christina gets a routine tongue-lashing from Joan. I guess this counts as a vintage product plug despite the less than cheery situation.

http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0082766/fullcredits

Re: Positive/Negative Product Placement

The Girl with the Dragon Tattoo (2011)

http://www.imdb.com/title/tt1568346/fullcredits

Apple
Google
Land Rover
McDonald's

Re: Positive/Negative Product Placement

On Letterman last night (June 4, 2012), part of the monologue was devoted to making fun of Mayor Bloomberg's recent outlawing of super-sized sugary drinks. To illustrate the bit, a 7-Eleven BIG GULP was shown for a couple of seconds. Later on the show, when Joan Rivers sits down to promote her new book, she mentions that Costco refuses to distribute it because of the 4-letter words in the dust jacket blurbs.

So, depending on how you look at it, 7-Eleven and Costco either got a little free advertising on national television or both chains got scathing reviews for respectively killing people with excess sugar and censoring books.

I cynic like me will think that both corporations paid for the "negative" mentions.

Re: Positive/Negative Product Placement

Last night, which happened to be St. Valentine's Day, Leno quipped "who knew?" that the best thing about waking up is "Folger's in your butt" in reference to an actual couple who are addicted to daily coffee enemas.

Letterman, also last night, included "Welcome to Denny's!" as the 3rd least romantic phrase that anyone could ever hear in his Top Ten list.

If the theory that any publicity is good publicity is `valid, then both Folger's and Denny's each got free national advertising. Otherwise, it gives their corporate lawyers an excuse to write angry memos to NBC and CBS.

Re: Positive/Negative Product Placement

Conan continues his ongoing negative references to Taco Bell with a recent joke about finding horse meat (the Brits refer to it as "equine DNA") mixed in with their beef. He has no apparent fear of reprisals. Way to go, Conan!

Leno: Taco Bell

During Leno's Monday night (March 18, 2013) monolog, he joked that the introduction of the new Doritos Locos Taco at Taco Bell had created hundreds of new jobs...for plumbers. For those who didn't get the joke he mimed using a plunger. Both he and Conan are unrelenting with negative mentions of the chain but I doubt that it has hurt business.

Re: Leno: Taco Bell


During Leno's Monday night (March 18, 2013) monolog, he joked that the introduction of the new Doritos Locos Taco at Taco Bell had created hundreds of new jobs...for plumbers. For those who didn't get the joke he mimed using a plunger. Both he and Conan are unrelenting with negative mentions of the chain but I doubt that it has hurt business.


Tuesday night (May 7, 2013) Jay Leno told his audience that Taco Bell is introducing a $1 menu or "an affordable way to get diarrhea" as he put it. Despite the bad blood between Leno and Conan, they are in harmony about the impact of Taco Bell on the functioning of the gastrointestinal tract.

"Talk amongst yourselves." ~ Linda Richman

Re: Leno: Taco Bell

I have to agree with the person who said that you seem to be mistaking conversation with product placement. Do you really think any of these people would mention the products for a free case of them? Or even a lifetime supply? I'm sure Katie Holmes can afford all the Vick's vapor rub she needs. And Emma Roberts can afford Pop Tarts and Conan can afford Toblerone and so on. And, yes, I would probably say I bought Certs (today it would be Altoids) instead of mints and a Snickers bar instead of just a candy bar. Maybe he was vying for a deal, but I use the brand names for those items myself, too.

The Taco Bell thing from Conan sounds just like a running (no pun intended) gag (also, no pun intended). See, even I am making jokes about Taco Bell. He probably has no fear of reprisal because in this case just about any publicity is good publicity. How many college students are probably making the same jokes, but yet still eat it because it's cheap and they like it? He's a comedian like Seinfeld. This is something that people do that is stupid so he makes jokes about it. The fact that it has a name brand doesn't mean he's on theIr payroll. And even if they gave him free Tacos for life at this point that would be a minuscule drop in the bucket compared to his net worth.

The one thing mentioned that caught my attention was Garth Brooks saying he took his family to McDonalds. That one made me wonder if he was angling for a deal. His wife, Trisha Yearwood, has a cooking show that is supposed to be more healthful ways of cooking Southern food. I just saw her on Katie (Couric) last week talking about it. So, I find it odd that he'd give a fast food restaurant a mention by name when his wife is trying to do just the opposite. If she weren't then I might not find it so odd, but I'd think he'd be more mindful of what he said in this regard, and he's been in the business long enough to know to be mindful of what he says.

The perfect human being is uninteresting. -Joseph Campbell

{Ignore phone posting errors.}

Re: Positive/Negative Product Placement

http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0590863/combined

Four decades ago, in the above cited episode of "Good Times" starring Jimmie Walker, "J.J." mentions that he bought Certs to get ready for a hot date and that a Snickers bar had melted in his pocket. He had purchased these items at the liquor store which he had been accused of robbing. He also said something about Supp-hose nylons (now a vintage brand) but I don't recall the context.

It seems to be an early example of weaving brand names into a storyline. He could have merely said "mints" or "candy bar" or "pantyhose" but he was quite specific about these real-world products.

Re: Positive/Negative Product Placement


In that perceived context, I would guess that it sounds more natural. The product placement was neither over the top or too generic. I think people would respond better to hearing something that is more conversationally acceptable. I know mint would be fine without specifics, but I would be less enthused about candy bar. There are too many different types of candy bars. A melted Quaker Chewy granola bar just wouldn't be as dramatically effective as a melted Snickers bar.

If Nestle was willing to pay my production company $10,000 to mention their product in dialog, I know I can fit in Crunch bar or Pure Life somewhere. I also know that I will not give them creative control.


Re: Positive/Negative Product Placement

Jenna Fischer was on Leno last night (Tuesday, March 19, 2013) talking about the final season of "The Office" and mentioned that she had recently allowed her toddler son to roam the aisles of a drug store just to see what he might select. He picked a toy car, Nilla wafers and an enema kit. Could there be a free lifetime supply of Nabisco cookies in her future?

Re: Positive/Negative Product Placement

Jay Leno managed a rather intricate triple whammy of negative publicity for some well-known brands in last night's (3/21/13) monolog.

He started the joke with a report that Neiman Marcus had received a fine for selling fake fur as real (or vice versa?). He said that this was just as bad as Olive Garden misrepresenting their fare as authentic Italian cuisine when it's actually Chef Boyardee from a can.

So, I guess you could call Jay a triple threat.

NOTE: The real chef who felt that he needed to spell his name phonetically (boy-ar-dee) on the label for dumb American consumers was Ettore Boiardi (1898-1985).

Re: Positive/Negative Product Placement

During Flight (2012), Denzel Washington discards, purchases and consumes a variety of well-known brands of liquor and beer. More often than not, the labels are easy to read. I'll have to slow down the DVD to get a complete inventory to add here later. I guess pouring it down the sink could be construed as negative product placement but maybe not.

http://www.imdb.com/title/tt1907668/fullcredits

"Talk amongst yourselves." ~ Linda Richman

Re: Positive/Negative Product Placement

My two favorite court shows (over-the-air since I don't have cable) are "The People's Court" and "Judge Judy". I've been surprised to hear the names of actual well-known businesses mentioned even though it would seem to be irrelevant legally to the case at hand. For example, a plaintiff or defendent might say that they were on their way to Walmart or Burger King when they got into a fender-bender.

I can't help wondering if this is paid product placement because they could just say they were "going to the store" without naming names.

Kat Dennings was on "Letterman" the other night and told an anecdote about cutting her hand on a kitchen knife. She called her mom for a ride to the hospital and her mom mentioned that she was shopping at Trader Joe's at the moment and couldn't come right away. Again, was this a subliminal plug for T.J.'s or just Kat being accurate? It's fun to imagine her getting a T.J.'s gift card and T-shirt in the mail after the show aired.

By the way, I don't think there's anything wrong with product placement. In fact, it's kind of fun to look for it.

"Talk amongst yourselves." ~ Linda Richman

Re: Positive/Negative Product Placement

I caught glimpses of quite a few well-known vintage brands in Hustle (1975) and probably missed a few others. Burt's character was clearly fond of his booze.

http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0073133/fullcredits

Pan Am
Coca-Cola
Quasar color TV with remote control!
Wild Turkey
Bushmill's (also included in dialog)
Jim Beam
Cutty Sark
TIME magazine

"Talk amongst yourselves." ~ Linda Richman

Re: Positive/Negative Product Placement

In last night's (4/24/14) episode of "The Big Bang Theory" during an awkward "date" for Penny and Sheldon at a fusion restaurant , Oreo and Nutter Butter (both Nabisco products) are mentioned in the context of the odd couple comparing fortune cookie messages. Sheldon implies that Nutter Butter is a lesser cookie than Oreo but I'm sure that Nabisco didn't object to the mildly negative comment.

Whether Jim Parsons is actually an Oreo fan is a moot question but he is probably eligible for a free lifetime supply.

"The Anything Can Happen Recurrence"

http://www.imdb.com/title/tt3572170/combined

"Talk amongst yourselves." ~ Linda Richman

Re: Positive/Negative Product Placement

On last night's (May 7, 2014) "Late Night with Seth Meyers" show, a running gag about Seth mistakenly having exchanged his look-alike credit card with Amy Poehler's card at a restaurant turns out to be nothing more than an elaborate American Express advertisement.

Amy has been sending Seth pictures of herself out on various spending sprees using Seth's hitherto unnamed credit card. Last night she is shown actually holding an American Express card with which, among other things, she says she bought a boat. The saga of the alleged mishap was amusing for about 15 minutes but is already getting very old.

I didn't notice if the card was green, gold, platinum or black. It seems to me that it was plain green. Accidental identity theft among celebrity friends is cute, apparently.

On the same show, Seth tells a "funny" story about enjoying a drunken night out on the town and somehow winding up at a McDonald's that he must have mistaken for a Burger King. It's sort of a negative mention of McD's and a positive reference to BK.

"Talk amongst yourselves." ~ Linda Richman

Positive/Negative Product Placement

In the TV series "T.J. Hooker" (1983), the episode "Payday Pirates" (season 2)...

http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0715445/fullcredits

...takes place partly inside a convenience store stocked with real products. I watched it on DVD yesterday and am listing only those items that I clearly remember:

COKE
Pepsi
U-Haul (across the street)
Hostess (Twinkies, etc.)
Wonder Bread
Disney (Mickey and Donald)
Campbell's (V-8 and soups)
Ghiradelli chocolates (stand-alone display cushions stunt actor's fall)
many, many more

I had it playing on a standard definition CRT TV. On an HD TV, the 35mm print probably makes even more product placements visible. I think I noticed a Winchell's Donut House in the neighborhood too. With so many major brands shown at one fell swoop, that episode may have almost paid for itself!

"Talk amongst yourselves." ~ Linda Richman

Re: Positive/Negative Product Placement

"True Detective" (2014)

Lone Star Beer

Jameson Irish Whiskey

T-Mobile

All of the above are pointed directly towards the lens (or, if you prefer, the camera is aimed right at them) for more than a few seconds. Not only that, the beer, the whiskey and the cell phone are all intertwined with the characters and the story.

Madison Avenue and the Props Department make a great team.

I guess you could argue that the beer and whiskey are negative placements because they influence some bad behavior in this HBO TV series.

T-Mobile is also sort of a bad guy in one episode even though their store clerk is super-friendly.

"Talk amongst yourselves." ~ Linda Richman

Re: Positive/Negative Product Placement

Seth Meyers' monolog last night (November 6, 2014) included a joke about Olive Garden's Never Ending Pasta Bowl. A male customer had used some sort of gift card or season pass to partake of said Pasta Bowl 70+ times for several consecutive weeks. The punchline was that this misguided glutton is now dead.

http://www.olivegarden.com/specials/never-ending-pasta-bowl

Jay Leno used to make fun of Olive Garden for not serving authentic Italian food. This continuing ridicule might suggest that NBC corporate has a hostile relationship with the chain but I believe that it is simply sophisticated advertising. Hey, Olive Garden can take a joke. They must be nice, fun-loving, generous people. Let's go get us some of that Never Ending Pasta right now!

"Talk amongst yourselves." ~ Linda Richman

Re: Positive/Negative Product Placement

Unless a place imports at least 79% of their content from Italy (or applicable) or the surrounding regions then that pretty much rules authentic out. It is impossible to replicate enough conditions to keep everything precise. Olive Garden is not necessarily a knock off, but it is no more authentic than any other Italian restaurant outside of Italy. Americans are horrible about genericising almost everything.

Jay Leno could have chosen any local Italian restaurant to lambast, but he obviously chose one that could benefit the most from his punch line. It is one that is frequented by people wanting cheap and consistent food. There are not that many national chains that serve much more than a limited range of Italian food. Sure if you live in Colorado, you have probably heard of Fazoli's, but Olive Garden has a more widespread reach. This widespread reach was his audience. It is not like people much know what is available in the greater Burbank market anyway.


Phony Budweiser

In numerous movies and TV shows I have noticed what, at first glance, appears to be an open container of Budweiser. On closer examination, it often turns out to be a Bud look-alike label (ornate red and white) and seems to be a standard prop used in the film industry.

I see no reason for Anheuser-Busch to complain as it's sort of a backhanded compliment to regard Bud, like Kleenex or BAND-AID, as the generic standard beer.

I believe that I have seen real Budweiser bottles and cans in quite a few films too.

"Talk amongst yourselves." ~ Linda Richman

BIG EYES (2014) starring Amy Adams

Big Eyes (2014)

http://www.imdb.com/title/tt1126590/fullcredits

Whenever there is a character, Margaret Keane in this case, walking up and down the aisles of a grocery store, there is a golden opportunity for product placement. Despite the story being set in the 1960s, the shelves of still-familiar items are too numerous to mention.

It's a great movie by the way.

"Talk amongst yourselves." ~ Linda Richman

Re: Positive/Negative Product Placement

Before Letterman sailed into oblivion, he ran a parody of the new Heinz mustard commercial. The punchline was that it's actually just yellow ketchup. I don't think Heinz filed a lawsuit.

Yeah, Heinz now makes mustard while French's is getting into the ketchup business.

These new products will appeal to OCD types who want their ketchup and mustard to match exactly.

"Talk amongst yourselves." ~ Linda Richman

Re: Positive/Negative Product Placement

In Kingsman: The Secret Service (2014),

http://www.imdb.com/title/tt2802144/fullcredits

the bad guy serves McDonald's to the good guy. An alternate title might be Kingsman: The Secret Sauce.

I doubt that McDonald's corporate would have any beef with this witty international-conspiracy caper. In fact, I suspect that McDonald's payed big bucks for this obvious product placement.

Although I was not familiar with the original comic book/graphic novel, I did like this movie.

"Talk amongst yourselves." ~ Linda Richman

Re: Positive/Negative Product Placement

Here are a few that were posted on youtube:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GP9enms7xY4

"Talk amongst yourselves." ~ Linda Richman

Taco Bell Causes Diarrhea

Last night Jimmy Fallon continued the late-night talk show tradition of associating Taco Bell with diarrhea. He showed a photo of Kansas City Royals' Lorenzo Cain walking away from the camera with a large brown stain on the upper leg of his uniform. It looks just like he had a diarrhea accident and soiled his pants. Actually, Lorenzo is part of a Taco Bell promotion/giveaway. That unfortunate stain was purely coincidental.

http://ftw.usatoday.com/2015/10/kansas-city-royals-lorenzo-cain-taco-bell-steal-a-base-steal-an-am-crunchwrap

Taco Bell won't sue. They love all the publicity, good or bad, they can get.

"Talk amongst yourselves." ~ Linda Richman

Re: Taco Bell Causes Diarrhea


Taco Bell won't sue. They love all the publicity, good or bad, they can get.


Actually, Taco Bell would get more publicity by suing, but I am certain that they realise that they would be giving a low rent talk show much more by doing so. Most people will not likely remember the gag in a week or two. Taco Bell probably does care but not to the extent of taking any more action than pulling any ads for that show. I assume that Taco Bell never advertised during the show, or the bit never would have gotten S&P's favour.















The view of the boards has changed for me. For years I had a bright colourful setting. I am now seeing the drab grey/blue default scheme. I do not remember changing it, but evidently, I had an accident recently. I cannot find any way to change it back. Will someone point me into the right setting. This old default setting is awful!

Re: Taco Bell Causes Diarrhea

I read that some women's handbag company was trying to appeal to ladies of taste and refinement and to distinguish its products from products used by the very tacky. So they sent Snooki from Jersey Shore a Coach bag which she happily carried around, and all the high class ladies never after that considered buying a Coach bag.
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