Soaps and Serials : Classic day time soaps

Classic day time soaps

Not that I was a big fan of them, but whatever happen to the daytime soaps?
You know, young and the restless, and the others (that have just escapes my brain as I write this).
Known as the middays at watch

Re: Classic day time soaps

soaps havent died - they've just moved to all the night time shows. cleverly renamed as "tv shows" now, so that people that watch them can do so without the stygma of the label "soap opera". all the night shows now are all soaps! "Scandal", "24", "Once Upon A Time", all of them! They're totally soap operas! All the shows are! Even (especially!) the so-called "reality" shows.

This is yet another Amber-quarantined area due to an unstable worm-hole. A-31422

Re: Classic day time soaps

more soaps: "Angel", "Grey's Anatomy", "The Good Wife", "E/R", "Friends", all soaps.....

This is yet another Amber-quarantined area due to an unstable worm-hole. A-31422

Re: Classic day time soaps

I have to correct you on these programs. They are not soaps.

The term SOAP OPERA, is actually in reference to the following:
Dallas
Falcon creast
The young and the restless
Young doctors
-others

The soap opera term comes from the program's that were sponsored and got funding from soap companies, to get them on the air.

Re: Classic day time soaps

Amusing that you refute night-time dramas as "soaps" and yet first name Dallas and Falcon Crest on your list, co-mingled with daytime dramas.

The term "soap opera" developed from daytime radio programming initiated in the 1930's with shows like Backstage Wife, Stella Dallas, Just Plain Bill which were continued melodramas sponsored mostly by soap manufacturers. The serials were 15 minute episodes airing Monday through Friday.

With the advent of television several attempts were made to move radio soaps to TV, but early efforts like One Man's Family, Valiant Lady and The Road of Life failed to capture viewers. Then when CBS scheduled Love of Life at 12:15, Search for Tomorrow at 12:30 and (directly from radio, using the same scripts and actors) The Guiding Light at 12:45; The Guiding Light proved that radio soap operas could be successful on TV. CBS started airing The Brighter Day (originally conceived for radio) at 4:00 pm and (the dynamically compelling) The Secret Storm at 4:15 pm.

Irna Phillips, a successful radio soap writer from the 1930's onwards (who'd created The Road of Life, The Right to Happiness, and The Guiding Light, among others) suggested CBS could produce a 30-minute soap less expensively than two different 15-minute soaps - in 1956 CBS launched As The World Turns at 1:30 pm and The Edge of Night at 4:30 pm. (Edge of Night was originally supposed to be a continuation of the CBS radio Perry Mason soap, but when Earl Stanley Gardner withheld the rights, CBS snatched up writer Irving Vendig from the radio Perry Mason serial along with radio's Perry Mason, John Larkin, as cop Mike Karr who wanted to be a lawyer ... and found itself with an unmitigated success.

Except for the daytime soaps on CBS, all TV programming featured game shows and was fairly boring. Then NBC seeing the success of 30-minute soaps created Today Is Ours at 3pm on June 30, 1958, which was a ratings failure and in December 1958 became the successful ratings winner Young Doctor Malone (borrowing characters from the long-running radio serial, but placing them in an updated situation) but the real June 1958 NBC winner was the 3:30 pm From These Roots, a brilliantly conceived family drama filled with P&G's favorite soap actors and actresses and introducing Ann Flood to TV audiences.

In the 1950's and 1960's soaps aired "live", they originated in CBS and NBC NYC studios and were able to snap up talented Broadway hopefuls. In truth in retrospect, even with covering forgotten lines and photographic mishaps, the "live" soaps were much more entertaining than what has now become the Hollywood dromedary ... today's 4 surviving soaps are incredibly dull. The story lines are so dragged out, in truth back in the heady days of CBS and NBC soap opera, they'd have been total ratings failures. JMHO

Re: Classic day time soaps

what i mean is not that they are CALLED soaps - what i mean is that all or most night time tv shows these days use the same FORMULA as soap storylines - regardless of what you want to call them, they are soap operas in THAT regard. I don't give a rat about technicalities like labels of what they're called. it's undeniable that their storylines have/use the same formula as daytime soap operas.

This is yet another Amber-quarantined area due to an unstable worm-hole. A-31422

Re: Classic day time soaps

It's a shame the 1950s soaps are incomplete in the archives. I believe the only 1950s soap opera for which a near-complete run exists is the Australian series Autumn Affair. All the 1950s American soaps only survive as scattered episodes, same with the British soaps (for example, one UK soap of the 1950s only has 3 surviving episodes). I believe the earliest US soap opera for which a complete run exists is "Days of Our Lives", though I might be wrong on that.




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