Classic TV: The 40s : Who Knows Anything

Who Knows Anything

about old tv puppet shows and not the usual ones like Howdy Doody and Kukla, Fran and Ollie?

A great deal of intelligence can be invested in ignorance when the need for illusion is deep.

Re: Who Knows Anything

I remember watching "Four Feather Falls" over here in the UK - very good and Gerry Anderson's first foray into TV puppetry.

http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0163445/

In fact, now I come to think of it, we had loads in the UK during the 50s - Muffin the Mule, Ragtag and Bobtail etc etc...........Oh!! And not forgetting the classic "Woodentops", and I must confess my favourite, which I still watch now and then!!!




Life is like a fly sitting on the rim of a urinal. Everything is fine until someone pisses you off.

Re: Who Knows Anything

Thanx for that, but since I am in America it doesn't help much. But I remember his marionette shows, the ones shown here, but I would like to hear from someone on this side of the pond who might know something about the American puppet shows of old.

A great deal of intelligence can be invested in ignorance when the need for illusion is deep.

Re: Who Knows Anything

The animated "Beanie and Cecil," of the '60's, was preceded by a (hand) puppet version in the early '50's. I don't know if it began in the '40's, we first got TV in '51. I don't find a record of it on IMDb, but I haven't checked "google."

Also, and I think this was local to the San Francisco market, there was a daily 15 minute program, featuring marionettes, called "Brother Buzz." Brother Buzz was a bee. He had a little bee girlfriend, and some other friends, whose names escape me. For bees to fly from scene to scene, the puppeteers would lift them from the ground, and flap their wings, while the set (which was circular) would rotate to the desired setting in front of the camera. There was an underlying message for children outlining various steps to brotherhood (honesty, friendship, etc.). I don't find it on IMDb, either, but I think I did find something about it on "google," once.

Re: Who Knows Anything

I know Beanie very well as I lived in LA when very young and it originated there and it was shown in 15 min segments. The little Bee guy I never knew like you did. I am particularly interested in show that had a puppy that was a knight; unfortunetly, I can't remember the name of the knight.

A great deal of intelligence can be invested in ignorance when the need for illusion is deep.

Re: Who Knows Anything

The only knight that I recall is Crusader Rabbit. However, as the title would suggest, he was a rabbit. It was, also, animation.

Re: Who Knows Anything

Yeah, I know and I luv that guy too, but I guess the endless search goes on. Thanx for trying, though.

A great deal of intelligence can be invested in ignorance when the need for illusion is deep.

Re: Who Knows Anything

The Beany and Cecil series with handpuppets started in 1949, 4 years before my folks had their first TV set. I do remember the comic book from my childhood, never realizing it was based on a TV show.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Beany_and_Cecil

correction/update

Oops, I just checked "google" for those 2 shows. The puppet version of "Beanie and Cecil," was called "Time for Beanie." And, "Brother Buzz" was a weekly program, not a daily. Oh, well ... it's amazing that I can remember anything, any more.

Re: correction/update

I don't know how far back you want to go, but in the early 60s, there was Shari Lewis and Lamb Chop. Obviously starring Shari Lewis and that's about all I know about it, except that Lamb Chop was a wise guy.(girl?)

Re: correction/update

Let's go back to very early 1950's!!

A great deal of intelligence can be invested in ignorance when the need for illusion is deep.

Re: correction/update

I've talked to 3 friends my age, who had TV by '51. One grew up, here, in SF. One is from Philadelphia, and another grew up in the Boston area. None of us recalls a puppy puppet, who was a knight.

It may have been a program, or character, that was local to Los Angeles. You might want to enter the call letters of the TV stations that were available, at that time. We had only the affiliates of NBC, CBC and ABC, which was a very new network, at that time.

Should I, suddenly, be taken with a flash of genius, I pass it along.



Re: correction/update

I,too, grew up in LA and I don't know where you got the idea it was a "puppy" knight. It was a knight pure and simple. Will probably never figure it out, but thanx anayway. Oh and I had the knight as a toy puppet, but I just wanted to know what the show was called.
In case anyone cares, it may have been something called "The Magic Cottage".

A great deal of intelligence can be invested in ignorance when the need for illusion is deep.

Re: correction/update

Is four years later too late to answer? Other puppet shows from the late 40s early 50s included Lucky Pup with the Bunin puppets Pinhead and Foodini; the Bil and Cora Baird puppet show Snarky Parker; Hold 'er Newt starring Newton Figg; Rootie Kazootie, which was the first show we saw on the new TV on Christmas Eve, 1949. All were hand puppets except Snarky Parker. A few years into the 50s, Ernie Kovacs had the Kapoosta Kid; ABC had a lunchtime program with Joe Bova who sat on a park bench in front of a wall and conversed with some puppets including a giraffe (I think). There was another similar show on CBS. The bench sitter was a newsman (I think). The name Lyle Van comes to mind. Even then the TV stations went off the air after 9AM and came back on at noon for the kids home from school for lunch, then went off the air again until 3 or 4PM. At night there was Winchell-Mahoney Time sponsored by Speidel watch bands which, at about $16.00, cost more than my watch.























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