Poldark : Does Poldark S2 end like 'Oldark' S2?

Does Poldark S2 end like 'Oldark' S2?

More or less with Ross going off to war? I'd loved Oldark's final scene with the OTP (Ross' farewell to Demelza from horseback), but if Poldark S2's ending is slightly different, that's okay too.

(Still though, now I wonder how Poldark S3 will end? Any different than Oldark S3? (I hope so.))

Re: Does Poldark S2 end like 'Oldark' S2?

The BBC Poldark from the 1970s only ran for two series. Series One covered all of the storyline that the new version has taken two series to reach (confused yet?). The end of Series One of that 70's version was quite similar to tonight's episode, with an angry mob marching on Trenwith (which doesn't happen in the novels) ready to kill George Warleggan and torch the place down.

The main difference was that in the 70's version the mob actually did burn it down. This led novelist Winston Graham to complain furiously to the BBC about the liberties which were being taken with his Poldark saga. Graham insisted that the producer be replaced for Series Two, and that all creative decisions had to be approved or vetoed by him henceforth.

For Series Two (which will be the new version's Series Three - still confusing, isn't it?), with Trenwith rather ridiculously burned down at the end of Series One, the screenwriters invented a new Poldark property, Penrhys, for George and Elizabeth to occupy.

The old version, which is now being termed on these boards Oldark, ended at the climax of Series Two (which will be the new version's Series Four!), meaning that Oldark managed to cover the first seven novels (in just two Series) and finished with The Angry Tide.

The eighth novel, The Stranger From The Sea (set several years later) was belatedly filmed by ITV with a new cast in the 1990s. I saw it when it went out. It was unspeakably awful!

Re: Does Poldark S2 end like 'Oldark' S2?

Was 'Oldark' or the 70s version run differently in the UK than the US? I remember binge watching Season/Series 1, 2, & 3 on DVD in 2015, and I'd thought that one Series ended with Ross going off to war, one with Trenwith burning, and one with George yelling at Valentine while standing beside Elizabeth's casket.

Although maybe you're right about the two seasons, and I just remembered wrong. That's okay.

Here's what I wrote over a year ago....lol

http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0075560/board/thread/177738118?p=2&d=246348671#246348671

Re: Does Poldark S2 end like 'Oldark' S2?

Series One was 1975, ending at the point in the saga reached in tonight's episode. Series Two was 1977, taking the saga to the end of book seven, The Angry Tide. At the end of Series One, Trenwith was burned down and Ross went off to war. This didn't happen in the novels. It was a rather silly embellishment which Winston Graham hated. It was however the way that the original TV version was written and executed. Series Two ended with George left broken, alone and in mourning after Elizabeth's death; and Ross and Demelza talking about the passing of the old century and the new era which is to come.

The new version is far more leisurely (and cinematic) in its pace and in the way it covers the same material. It's being told at literally half the speed of the Oldark version. It's going to take them four series this time just to cover seven novels. They'll have to wait a few years to cover the other five: because Ross, Demelza and their family are all many years older in those novels.

Re: Does Poldark S2 end like 'Oldark' S2?


The new version is far more leisurely (and cinematic) in its pace and in the way it covers the same material. It's being told at literally half the speed of the Oldark version.

Sorry, duke-verity. Not quite sure what you mean there.

Oldark took 16 hours to cover the first four Poldark books. New-Poldark has done it in 18 hours. Not much difference.






If there aren't any skeletons in a man's closet, there's probably a Bertha in his attic.

Re: Does Poldark S2 end like 'Oldark' S2?

New Poldark has only covered the first four novels so far in two series. The old version covered them in one.

Oldark covered seven novels in two series. It will take the new version four series to reach that point. That's pretty much what I meant. It has been dramatically paced to run for longer than the original BBC version, which covered the events of seven novels in a rather more concentrated two series run.

Re: Does Poldark S2 end like 'Oldark' S2?

Those were the days when 16 episode series were the norm...

Mind you, we had to wait a full two years between series one and series two of Oldark. I remember it well.




If there aren't any skeletons in a man's closet, there's probably a Bertha in his attic.

Re: Does Poldark S2 end like 'Oldark' S2?

Hmm, ditto. It's not just about the number of episodes and way the saga has been divided into series (two for the old version, four confirmed by the BBC for the new version). The new version will run considerably longer in terms of both its run on the BBC, and in terms of its overall length as a story.

The Oldark was obliged to rattle through studio-bound scenes (shot on the then standard 1970's 625-line colour videotape, with exteriors shot on grainy 16mm filmstock) at a faster pace, and all within the shorter run of a two series time frame. There was a story to be told, and not as much time (or budget) available as there is in the new version for characters doing lots of long, moody, cinematic staring into space; and galloping majestically along seashores; and gazing into fires as they emote in closeup with their magnifique designer stubble; and banging on portenteously about the rights of man and the plight of the oppressed working poor (although the original also had its fair share of these moments).

The new version has just that bit more time, space and budget to slow down a little; to vary pace, and to have more quiet, lingering, cinematic and introspective character moments. It's a matter of personal taste as to which version and which dramatic approach one prefers.

It's simply a new way of telling the old story, aimed at today's Game of Thrones weaned type of audiences, rather than at the taste of audiences of forty years ago. Fair enough. The old version probably seems very clunky and erratic now (although I'll always be rather fond of it). Time and television drama styles move on.
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