The End of the Tour : Are anachronisms a non-issue in films these days?

Are anachronisms a non-issue in films these days?

Maybe it's expensive to have everything relevant to a particular time a film wants to depict, but to have blatant anachronisms in a film is just sloppy.

The film begins in 2008, but when David and Wallace come back from Minnesota and are searching for their car in what is supposed to be 1996, it seems they flew forward in time to 2015, seeing as how the vehicles in the parking lot had models from the 21st century. There was even a late model Nissan Maxima.

When films get nominated for awards, there need to be objective parameters by which they're graded. If your film is set in a certain period, make sure everything on film is relevant to that period; don't be lazy. It completely takes some people out of the movie.

Re: Are anachronisms a non-issue in films these days?

I agree. Ponsoldt probably didn't want to put down tens of thousands of dollars to buy enough '90s used cars to fill a parking lot.
In this case I think that we must blame the video editor.
Edit: for people who didn't go to film school, it would be a simple matter of a few close shots of them walking through the lot with the modern cars just looking like blurs then they could do the dialogue near their car with a still shot with two or three '90s used cars on either side of the car.
I'm guessing that Ponsoldt had those shots and just assumed that the editor was going to cut it properly.


Re: Are anachronisms a non-issue in films these days?

It was actually discussed about in the "Making Of" special feature on the dvd. Especially with the parking lot scenes, and DFW's old civic.

It had to do with budget reasons of course. I agree to a point, but it didn't take me out of the film experience.

Re: Are anachronisms a non-issue in films these days?

incredibly bizarre coincidence:

I just read your comment as I was watching the film. I realized that I had forgotten about the director's commentary, turned it on, then thought it was going to replay the entire movie (which I wanted). Instead it took me to the spot where I left off before I turned on the commentary-- (swear to god) at EXACTLY the beginning of the scene when Eisenberg/Lipsky is searching for his car in the lot.
extremely interesting-- they used CGI to block out a modern Prius because they knew that it would stand out even to people who are vaguely aware of car models


Re: Are anachronisms a non-issue in films these days?

Honestly you shouldn't have even noticed or cared- take a chill pill, dude.

Re: Are anachronisms a non-issue in films these days?

The director said they controlled only six spaces. This was a major airport where they didn't have the luxury of filling the lot with vintage cars even if they could afford it.

I don't know everything. Neither does anyone else
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