Food and Drink : Korean food

Korean food

I found some recipes online to try some new foods, and it includes using some ingredients that I've never used before. Has anyone cooked with any of these ingredients?

One is Lee Kum Kee dark soy sauce. I'm not sure what makes it particularly different from the regular soy sauce that I've used, but I'm about to find out.

I'm mixing a variety of rice including sticky rice and Jasmine rice. I'm also learning about the differences between short, medium and long grain rice when it comes to recipes and the benefits of blending them.

Chinkiang Vinegar is a fermented black vinegar. I've never used anything like this before.

Shaoxing Wine Rice Wine is a Chinese cooking wine. I've used rice wine before in some of my macrobiotic rice dishes, but I haven't used it beyond that in any formal recipe.

Sempio Organic Gochujang is a red pepper chili paste that combines sweet, savoury and spicy. This will be my first time using this, so I'm totally going to be guessing on how to maximize using this.


@azn_2 Anything ringing a bell? Do you have any suggestions or ideas?

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Re: Korean food

Sorry, Lilith. I'm depressed so I probably haven't cooked really good food for over a year. I just order a lot of food these days.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Race,_Evolution,_and_Behavior

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Why did she tag you? That was rude. Are you her servant or something?

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lol at you being jealous.

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Oh I get plenty of attention from azn. I need not be jealous of this attention show Lilith is playing right now.

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Lol at you knowing nothing about your culture.

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She orders out, dummy.

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No one can afford that everyday especially someone on disability.

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She does.

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I know more about european cooking than you do.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Race,_Evolution,_and_Behavior

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No you don't

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Re: Korean food

Yes, I do. You know nothing about your european culture.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Race,_Evolution,_and_Behavior

Re: Korean food

That's interesting since I'm European, you stupid twit.

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Re: Korean food

You're Dane.? Then you know nothing about european cooking either. You can barely afford food. And Millard is fat so he just eats fastfood.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Race,_Evolution,_and_Behavior

Re: Korean food

I'm depressed, so I don't feel like cooking a lot of homemade food these days.! I have posted about making korean food on here before and it gets totally ignored.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Race,_Evolution,_and_Behavior

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Yeah Lilith totally ignored your posts back then. Now suddenly Lilith needs you to snap out of a depression so that you're available to serve her recipe ideas because she bought a few Korean items on sale.

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lol you're such a drama queen.

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Re: Korean food

I'm sorry that you're depressed right now. sad.gif I have about 3 recipes to try.

Here, friend. Have some hugs, and take care of yourself! love10.gif

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Am I missing something? I could be missing something. I often miss things.

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You're welcome, azn. ❤️

Am I missing something? I could be missing something. I often miss things.

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The timing is impeccable don't you think? You've been very vocal about your mental illness on here for years….

The only time that Lilith responds is when she needs you.


Don't fall for it.

Re: Korean food

I've used them all!

Dark soy sauce is a sweeter and slightly thicker (Marginally really) sauce that I put in while cooking while the saltier lighter stuff I usually reserve for dips or as a condiment. You'll taste the difference immediately and enjoy both light and dark I should think. Normally dark soy would be added after most of the frying of veg and meat has been cooked and at around the adding rice/noodles stage.

Sticky rice is great ad gelatinous. Jasmine rice is like basmati rice in that it is easy to cook and is not clumpy. You don't fry sticky rice and if you are going to fry jasmine rice it's best to have cooked it the day before and left it overnight in the fridge or covered with a tea towel.

Chinkiang Vinegar is a nice thick vinegar (The same marginally that dark soy is) and is often used with fish dishes or later in a dish like dark soy is (Around the adding rice and noodles part). Its often used along with spicy dishes these days but that's a very recent development in Chinese cooking (It's from East China) as spicy food is generally associated with West China. Obviously Korea borrow heavily from China and Japan in regard to common ingredients.

Shaoxing rice wine is like Chinkiang vinegar, but nowhere near as tart and is quite sweet in a softer way that dark soy. This would go in at the very end for serving generally but if you are doing a long slow broil it can add a lot of character early on (Most foods from that region are fast made, with a few exceptions).

Gochujang is where the magic happens! aura.gif

There are lots of ways to use gochujang as it can be as simple as part of a dipping sauce with soy or fish sauce (Or both!), it can be added at the end of a quick ramen type dish or bibimbowl, a paste for a fried dishes or a glaze for a grilling dish. There's lots more room with it but it is a central ingredient, they all are really but this one is a must for most dishes (For me!).

Starting out suggestions

Let's not spoil much by way of meat or veggies without knowing what you like. I'd suggest a simple thing like gochujang with boiling water in a mug (For sipping). You'll see how spicy you might like the sauce and it works a treat as an alternative to tea as it is.

Make a little sticky rice to see how it is done. A medium boil with the usual two cups of water for one cup of rice, stir it as often as you want but lower the heat to tiny and let all the water steam off before maybe scooping it and pressing it into little cups which you turn upside down on your plate for bun-like hills. I'd recommend dark soy and some fish sauce mixed (Maybe with thinly sliced chilli) as a dip for the rice.

Once you know your tastes with spicy and dark sweet you can think about peppers, pea pods, cabbage and mushrooms with the gochujang and a little vinegar and/or wine (Add garlic paste and pepper too) with light soy for saltiness and get your freak on.

Once you've got that out the way try some chicken, pork or beef to flesh out (Pardon the pun) what you like and I'd say settle on doing fish once you are confident.

Next up maesil syrup and all sorts of other sauces which you might even start bottling yourself for the experience.

Lots of fun with all the types of cooking using ingredients from the Far East smile.gif

Korean and Chinese cooking are great flavours to go for and I'm sure you'll be adding peanuts, water chestnuts and beansprouts to squid and pork with "Magic salt" in no time at all winkgrin.gif

Good luck Lilith and share your adventures with us smile.gif

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Re: Korean food

Technically you haven't, Squiggy. Juan has.

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Re: Korean food

He may have had more experience of it since we departed from each other but I was there just as much as he was /. and I've cooked Korean since being independent too! yes.gif

But sharp eye and well worth keeping up with! winkgrin.gif

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Re: Korean food

Are glass noodles Korean?

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Re: Korean food

I think they are Chinese /. but I could be wrong giveup.gif

I've only had them a few times and I hate cooking them as they are the one thing that takes an age to get done properly.

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You're an interesting fellow.

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Re: Korean food

Not when I'm trying to get my glass noodles to be edible and all my other elements of my dish are sitting in their pots and bowls waiting with me for the damn things to soften up enough to actually eat!!! angry1.gif

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Re: Korean food

I saw a recipe with glass noodles!

Am I missing something? I could be missing something. I often miss things.

Re: Korean food

Just make some glass noodles up for yourself to see how long it takes Lilith. They really can add on a lot of time and can mess up preparing everything to plate up together at once if you are serving them fresh and hot.

They keep after being made if you are serving them cold alongside the rest of your meal though, and are often eaten that way in many restaurants.

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Re: Korean food

No thank you. I'm not interested enough to make them. I would order them if out, but otherwise, I think I'll invest my time elsewhere. :)

Am I missing something? I could be missing something. I often miss things.

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Yeah you should leave Asians and their food alone. Bye!

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We all know how much you enjoy your rice, noodles and fries in the same container with your Chinese food Donna yes.gif

I don't see why you get to enjoy it but Lilith doesn't no.gif

Is it because she's trying to make her own? giveup.gif

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Re: Korean food

Apparently you've never had takeout at an all you can eat Chinese restaurant where you put as much inside the container for your money's worth.

You wouldn't possibly understand because you aren't an American.

I don't see why you get to enjoy it but Lilith doesn't no.gif

Lilith never said that now did she, Juan?

Re: Korean food

I had a feeling you would know about these ingredients, and I was hoping you'd chime in!

Thank you for explaining the ingredients to me in more detail. I found the recipes online as I've been experimenting with Korean dishes (among a few other things), so I decided to order the ingredients I don't have and the ones I'm not familiar with so that I could make these dishes.

Yep, the first recipe I have is for chicken and they added the dark soy sauce right at the end, and it looked thicker than my soy sauce. They also made sure to mention to never, ever use Kikkoman. It was made clear to try and stay as authentic as possible with the ingredients being used, so that's why I ended up getting some of these to try.

So, it sounds like between the rice wine, the vinegar and the dark and light soy sauce, I'm getting a perfect blend, so nothing gets overwhelmed. There was a big focus on balance.

I already have fish sauce, and I use that in my cooking.

I'm really looking forward to trying the Gochujang. It's arriving today! It looks so tasty, I can't wait.

I'm familiar with sticky rice already. I make sushi with it. To be clear, when I say sushi, I mean veggie sushi. I dislike raw fish and dislike traditional sushi. I love sticky rice but need to make sure I only eat it in moderation do to so much starch. This is also where my rice wine would come in.

Maesil syrup? I've never heard of that before, so that's definitely something I need to look into.

As I told AZN, I already have 3 recipes to try out, and I didn't have all of the ingredients. I purchased the ones I'm unfamiliar with and I'm curious as to how my new dishes are going to come out! biggrin.gif

Am I missing something? I could be missing something. I often miss things.

Re: Korean food

There's a Vietnamese place near me (Well, a few actually) and they have Kikkoman bottles on their tables and bench for use by customers. They also have Flying Goose siracha bottles. I asked the manager nicely one evening as they were shutting up why they don't just fill those pretty, and well known, bottles up with the good stuff (Which is also considerably cheaper) and he told me that they did laugh.gif

So places use the pretty things that people recognise but the taste is where it is always at Lilith yes.gif

As long as my kitchen has fresh onions, the various pastes and purees, spices and dried herbs, standard sauces and dried pulses and mushrooms I'm pretty set for starting on anything.

Big bags of rice are the way to go too. I don't think I could ever buy a small bag again (Unless those types of weevil end up in Scotland or I end up somewhere with them).

Maesil syrup is a type of plum sauce which goes well with all sorts of stuff. Oyster sauce is something I forgot to mention earlier, that and maesil syrup make a lovely dark and sweet sauce used for dipping on just as a sauce with spring onions and some stock. Lots of tasty adventures and I regularly fall back to a soup in a mug trying them all out.

I think you'll rock this one to high heavens winkgrin.gif

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Re: Korean food

Gameboy pls !!

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Re: Korean food

But I love those little Kikkoman bottles (I actually disposed of a bottle yesterday).

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Re: Korean food

My Gochujang just arrived, so I simply had to taste it. Wowza! This stuff is yummy! I can't wait to put this to the test and start cooking with it.

I don't like the idea of you being buried among weevils, and I definitely don't like the idea of finding any in my bags of rice. I have two types of rice and just need to pick up the sticky rice. I usually have a container of it, but alas, it's fallen by the wayside and was in need of being renewed.

I always enjoy my sauces. In fact, those tend to be my downfall. I can have a heavy hand and need to really exercise restraint.

I'm very curious about Maesil syrup. Is there a brand you can recommend? I'm looking them up now, and as you said, it's all about the quality. I'd like to order some to try.

Speaking of plums, I would eat umeboshi plums whole. Well, not technically whole. I would cut them into pieces and then suck on little pieces of them. The paste is also good but I much prefer the actual plums.

Am I missing something? I could be missing something. I often miss things.

Re: Korean food

Wow! Umeboshi plums are an acquired taste for most Lilith. They've got all the good deep flavours in them and yet still give a refreshing feel smile.gif

As for a brand for maesil syrup, it's mostly all in Korean or the Chinese equivalent and so I can't really say. If the bottle looks nice, with a plum and green coloured label on it, that's usually enough for me. But you can get the clearer bottles with the more syrup looking liquid inside too. I can tell you that I've not had a bad brand if that helps biggrin.gif

As for sticky rice the Thai people have so much that they do with it you wouldn't believe. A nice one is to grind out the inside of coconuts and keep all that fresh white flesh. They have a special kind of inverted horseshoe tool called a "Love" which scraps it all out with you repeating a motion of scratching it off. Once you have a lot of the flesh from the insides of many coconuts (It's a social thing that women do together for special events) it all gets pulped with the sticky rice and banana and wrapped in a banana tree leave and tied with thinner long leaves.

They are a dessert to have an big events like celebrating someone becoming a monk or a wedding. It's just sweet coconut, banana sticky rice cake things but they are wonderful and easy to eat and always surrounded with laughter and smiles smile.gif

Back onto your shopping arriving though, that gochujang will be the centre element of so many dishes from here on out be they soups or roasts. Amazing tasty stuff which you might even try making yourself one day just for the hell of it (Once you think about how to make it your own). It there are any street vendors or market places which cater to those who use chilis a lot make friends there and buy in bulk closer to when you might try. The savings from making a full day out of stuffing jars and bottles full of chillies, black bean pastes, tomatoes, vinegars and all sorts of other things really adds up if you eat with it often - and it keeps for a long time if you preserve it properly yes.gif

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Re: Korean food

This sounds amazing. I am going to make these. 😋

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Re: Korean food

It really is easy /.

But make sure you have clean and cry jars with lids that are also clean and dry (And fit!)

After that it's lots of chopping of chillies so watch those eyes (And privates! hehe.gif ) then it's vinegar and whatever else you feel like adding to get the flavour balance. Garlic, peppers, black bean paste, zest, seeds, spices, alcohol, herbs - I know folk that put vanilla pods and cinnamon sticks in because they like the hints it offers.

And the longer it's in those jars and bottles the stronger the taste will be.

Just keep them out of sunlight though, spoilers the colours at minimum and the taste altogether if too much light gets in.

But give it a go and, who knows, it might be something that gets sold at your local farmers market alongside jams, pickles and mustards smile.gif

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Re: Korean food

I will stick to the banana and coconut wraps. 😂

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Re: Korean food

If you can't get lots of fresh coconuts (They are everywhere in Thailand, literally falling into gardens and parks all over) they cartons of coconut cream will work. Something like this:

512DWvMzIHL._AC_UF894,1000_QL80_.jpg

or

71NxyWWwKmL._AC_UL600_SR600,600_.jpg

Just make sure it's not the liquid only, it needs to be like a paste.

Mi that in with your sticky rice and bananas and you've got it!

I don't know where you'll get the banana tree leaves though uhoh.gif

Enjoy!

I'm sure there'll be a proper recipe and alternatives out there on the web somewhere which is better than I've explained /. smile.gif

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Re: Korean food

Tropical living would be aces. I have seen this coconut cream before. I usually use the canned for some curry dishes.

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Re: Korean food

The canned stuff works a treat, just make sure it's not the coconut milk/water because that's not the flesh part but more the liquid which falls out of a cracked coconut.

I've bought the wrong stuff before and still haven't figured out how or why?! giveup.gif

Tropical living is aces, but a lot of other things like it just as much as we do. Things like snakes, spiders, scorpions, monkeys, lizards, big birds, sharks and octopuses and sea urchins and bugs with big armoured skeletal bodies and plants which can kill and all sorts of circuses and bugs and bacteria and rats and ants and mosquitos…

…And then of course there are the drunken tourists (Which the locals will presume you to be one of at first!)

It's all an adventure, but the people and food are nice and that's the most important thing about anywhere /. smile.gif

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Re: Korean food

i’m a Polynesian God, Miss negative Nancy.

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Re: Korean food

Remember the video of the Korean street breakfast sandwiches from a few weeks ago? The amount of omelettes made here blows that one away.



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Re: Korean food

Yes! I do! In fact, after that, I started binge watching some cooking videos and went down the rabbit hole and from there, I learned a new way of cooking eggs. I learned how to make Cantonese eggs and I'll never make them any other way. They're amazing!

Am I missing something? I could be missing something. I often miss things.
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