The Funhouse : What was Richie thinking….

What was Richie thinking….

…stealing the money? Such a jerk-off and putting the rest of them in so much more jeopardy. Buzz was a jerk too, but him Amy and Liz really didn't deserve to go through what they did, especially with Richie exacerbating the situation…."I was going to split it", as though that makes it ok! Not to mention his lighter dropped as well to give them away.

They witness a murder, they were trespassing and then any decent person, older teens or not, would have needed to find any way out to hightail it out of there, but Richie the stupid git, had to pilfer the money.

I felt so bad for Liz, cause she really liked him and the absolute desperation to get out of a hopeless situation using the only thing she had, her sex, to avoid getting snuffed was pathetically wretched and tragic. Why oh why didn't she stick the dagger in the creature's neck instead of his back?

And then Amy's absolute sense of defeat once she's stuck in the Funhouse's mechanical room and finding no way out of the despair, that was just a nightmare come alive. Her fear and sense of impending doom was just palpable and raw.

Well mounted and vivid early 80's horror opus that knows what to show, how to show it and how to keep the tension real.

Norman! What did you put in my tea?

Re: What was Richie thinking….

I liked how the young people basically bring what happens to them upon themselves by staying in the carnival after it closes. That was a nice and inspired departure from the usual hapless victims of unfortunate circumstance trope that's very common in 80's horror slasher fare.

Yes, this is really me.

Re: What was Richie thinking….

Yes, that is a good point.

They weren't just random fodder for the sake of it. They did something that seemed exciting and fun at the time, but placing themselves somewhere where they had no right to be.

They became privy to something that wasn't meant for their eyes and that forbidden foray was the price of being trapped in the Gorgon's lair.

Norman! What did you put in my tea?

Re: What was Richie thinking….

"The Funhouse" was definitely a cut above most of the early 80s slasher output. For the reason you stated as well as Tobe Hooper's imaginative direction.

"My life is over. I might as well dance with Johnny Slash!"

Re: What was Richie thinking….

…as well as Tobe Hooper's imaginative direction.
Hooper's directorial skills here are mighty impressive.

He knew what he wanted and he understood the language of terror cinema, especially the potential for pushing the visual narrative into his story.

Norman! What did you put in my tea?

Re: What was Richie thinking….

I did not like Richie at all. From the beginning, I thought Richie was a tool. Him stealing the money after witnessing a murder is unconscionable. And then he has to drop the damn lighter and get them all caught. Not to mention the fact that it was Richie's dumb idea to stay the night in the funhouse in the first place. Part of it can be chalked up to immaturity, but Richie's first thought was for Richie.

I know you like Amy, Mr. Toasty. I like her, too. She is spirited, fun-loving and pretty. I like her slightly over Liz, whom I did like but seemed out of it at times. I love Buzz. He is my favorite character. He kept his act together the whole time and he seemed like a good guy.

Of course, my FAVORITE character just HAS to be Madame Zena!

"My life is over. I might as well dance with Johnny Slash!"

Re: What was Richie thinking….

Him stealing the money after witnessing a murder is unconscionable….Not to mention the fact that it was Richie's dumb idea….Richie's first thought was for Richie.
Yup! It was like an instantaneous karma suddenly befell upon all of them and part of the substance here, is that ANY action, has the potential to drag others down too, just as it can also lift others up.

Richie was a tool of the first order. Liz is a bit ditzy, but that speaks some volumes too as she was Ritchie's girl and they did really like each other. Liz was distraught with his demise, but it was also kind a fitting that Buzz inadvertently buried the axe in his head. I often wonder if Richie was actually dead before that happened.

Largo Woodruff rendered her real and she was very believable and all acted their roles very well. I also feel it is hard to top Berridge's intense performance as a final girl compared to many other slashers from that period.

Buzz was a down to earth and gritty kinda guy. His character was a bit douchy for my liking though.

Norman! What did you put in my tea?

Re: What was Richie thinking….

I think I got Amy and Liz mixed up. Liz was the fun-loving blonde girl. Amy was the lone survivor.

I like both girls a lot.

I've always liked people who are a little on the ditzy side, like Liz. There is something endearing about them.

When the four of them are snooping around the back of the tent and Liz says "Alright, I'll go find my own hole!" it makes me laugh.

Berridge was great when she told off her little brother for being a little perv. Very convincingly acted.

Wasn't Berridge in "Amadeus" as well?

"My life is over. I might as well dance with Johnny Slash!"

Re: What was Richie thinking….

I've always liked people who are a little on the ditzy side, like Liz. There is something endearing about them.
Liz would have been fun to hang out with. There were no airs or graces with her either. When she went up to Amy to ask her what she wanted to do next as it was her turn and Amy was entranced by the barker and went…"What?" Liz mimicked her with an exaggerated…."Whaaaat?"

Yes, I love that line of hers about the finding her own hole and then she goes…"I can't believe I just said that." Excellent delivery of throwaway lines that work so wonderfully in the moment.

Joey was actually pretty ballsy to do what he did to his sister. He needed a good spanking for that, but see the look on his face when she roasted him. He got scared then!

She did say, "…..just for that, I'm not taking you to the Carnival on Saturday." Yet right at the end when Amy was walking away all disheveled and distressed, it looked like they were taking the carnival down.

I often wonder what would have happened next. The movie makes me want to know more. What was the first thing Amy did on her way out? Joey also saw her go in, but not come out and he didn't say anything. If he had, he may have saved them when his folks came to pick him up.

Imagine what the cops would find, all those dead bodies in various forms and a mutant crushed between 2 giant cogs. What a gruesome macabre sight!

I wonder too if Joey took down all his horror paraphernalia and turned into something like Annabelle's squeaky clean nerdy little brother from the Jodie Foster Freaky Friday

Yes, Berridge plays Mozart's wife Stanzi in Amadeus. She has some very good scenes. She's also Laura Dern's sister in the offbeat and terrifically acted Smooth Talk - 85' and plays a gf in the pretty good t.v. movie about teen sucide Silence Of The Heart - 84' with Charlie Sheen.

She doesn't have a large film resume.

Norman! What did you put in my tea?

Re: What was Richie thinking….

There's actually a whole subtext about karma and actions having consequences in this film, as articulated by the old bag lady who tells Amy that God sees everything that people say and do. This film has an unusually well thought out script for a slasher film.

Yes, this is really me.

Re: What was Richie thinking….

There was novelisation written by Dean Koontz, based on Larry Block’s script.

I might have it somewhere at home. Not read though.

Norman! What did you put in my tea?

Re: What was Richie thinking….

I've got the book as well. I never knew it was based on a movie!

Re: What was Richie thinking….

Koontz has expanded the story apparently, with movie narrative the last part of the book.

Norman! What did you put in my tea?
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