The Lord Of The Rings : Terry Pratchett

Terry Pratchett

So, I was in the English-speaking section of a bookstore in the Balkans a week ago, and my eyes fell on a Terry Pratchett book, The Science of Discworld: Part 4, or something like that.

I picked it up and flipped through it, and found myself very interested; it sounded like pretty fluid and intelligent entertaining prose. I didn't buy it at the end, not wanting to overspend (intent on buying a mother's day present instead), but have remained intrigued. Since the last time Terry Pratchett's books were mentioned here, a few friends elsewhere have recommended them (saying they are witty and humorous satire).

Something tells me I'll give one or two a try eventually; I've come to the realization we all need some fantasy in our lives (and that sometimes a good book hides under a campy-looking cover).

Do any fellow Ringnuts recommend these "Science of Discworld" books?

Re: Terry Pratchett

I do love the Terry Pratchett novels was a very sad moment in march when he passed away due to Alzheimer's as I had grown up reading his novels and they were a bright spark when I needed cheering up at some darker times.

I am not sure on what the "science of" books are like but I can definitely recommend reading your way through the Discworld series if you haven't already done so.

In regards to the quality of the novels they do vary from book to book but what they do have is a lovely satire on our world today which while it can be biting does not perhaps get too cynical in the Discworld leaving avenues for hope.

In terms of if you are going to get into the books some people say read from start to finish some say you can read the various Arcs that run through his books. For example you can follow Granny Weatherwax and the witches or perhaps track Rincewinds accidental heroism or indeed some would say the strongest and most allegorical character to our world would be Captain Sam Vimes and the various Guards books.

If you don't want to start at the beginning my own recommendation would for you to pick up Guards Guards it is an excellent book that starts off Vimes' career and sets the scene for future Ankh-Morpok books.

As an alternative introduction to Pratchett you could do worse than pick up Good Omens a book that he collaberated on with Neil Gaimen another of my favourite authors.

Iain

So we come inevitably from Daedalus and Icarus to the Giant Bomber. It is not an advance in wisdom!

Re: Terry Pratchett

The Science Of Discworld books are written by scientists (IIRC) Jack Cohen and Iain Stewart as an exploration of the world of science, it's politics, history etc. around a framing novella written by TP. They are part of the wider Pratchett industry. They're a bit of a cash in, but still worth a read.
Terry Pratchett is my favorite author. As Elwe says above the Discworld books do vary a bit in quality - In the first two, he's finding his feet, the last few books where, perhaps inevitably, rather weak, and there was a period in the late nineties early noughties when he putting books out at a tremendous rate and to borrow a phrase from Tolkien feel like butter spread over too much bread. But it's a rare Pratchett novel that doesn't leave you feeling better about life and the world after you've finished it.

Re: Terry Pratchett

Hi Vortimer; thanks for the heads up on the Science of Discworld books, the ups and downs of Pratchett's trajectory, and the overall recommendation of his novels as well, especially:

But it's a rare Pratchett novel that doesn't leave you feeling better about life and the world after you've finished it.

That makes them sound fine enough. Once I find an English-language bookstore which has them again, I'll buy a copy.



Re: Terry Pratchett

Hello Iain, sorry for the late response; I've been having some laptop trouble lately (something Pratchett might have been able to find humor in, no doubt).

Those are good insights, thank you; especially regarding the story arcs. I'll try to find copies of the particular books you recommend (the Guards or Good Omens books).

And yes, by the cover illustrations alone, they seem rather on the cheerful side, which is always something appreciated. Knowing that you enjoyed them, at any rate, makes them sound recommendable.

It is lamentable that he died; but I'm sure he left feeling some satisfaction for his contribution to literature (as Tolkien no doubt did). What more can a writer ask for?



Re: Terry Pratchett

Hmm. I personally cannot recommend Pratchett. I tried more than once to get into his work and never managed it. To this day, I just scratch my head wondering what all the fuss is about.

"He was one mailroute away from being Cliff Claven"

Re: Terry Pratchett

Hey, Corsten, it's been a while; how are you?

Thanks for your input. I'll give it a whir regardless and see if I like it; if so, great, if not, no big deal (I'm sure it can't be as bad as some of the other series out there we've previously discussed).

Hope all is well!



Re: Terry Pratchett

Hello kjnics, it has been a while indeed. Time travels so fast these days, or else is so short, or else there's so much to do and no time to do it in - can't think which.

I am well thank you, keeping very busy and on better form all round than ever. What about you?

"He was one mailroute away from being Cliff Claven"

Re: Terry Pratchett

I'm doing well; there are times things could be a great deal better, and others they could be a great deal worse to paraphrase Gandalf. I'm finishing up my master's thesis and hoping to find work here in Europe somewhere if I don't return to the Americas.

Time travels so fast these days, or else is so short, or else there's so much to do and no time to do it in - can't think which.

Never a truer statement; how long ago where we early 20-somethings chatting here with everything ahead of us?

Re: Terry Pratchett

His stuff's okay. I like some of it, don't like some, not a huge fan. My son is a huge fan, though. Give it a shot.

It ain't what they call you, it's what you answer to--W.C.Fields
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