Politics : What do you think of E-democracy for America?

What do you think of E-democracy for America?

E-democracy (a combination of the words electronic and democracy), also known as digital democracy or Internet democracy, incorporates 21st-century information and communications technology to promote democracy. It is a form of government in which all adult citizens are presumed to be eligible to participate equally in the proposal, development, and creation of laws. E-democracy encompasses social, economic and cultural conditions that enable the free and equal practice of political self-determination. Ordinary people ruling America.

Kali Linux i hax yous

Re: What do you think of E-democracy for America?

Proponents of E-democracy sometimes envision a transition from a representative democracy to a direct democracy carried out through technological means, and see this transition as an end goal of e-democracy.[84] In an Electronic direct democracy (EDD) (also known as open source governance or collaborative e-democracy), the people are directly involved in the legislative function by electronic means. Citizens electronically vote on legislation, author new legislation, and recall representatives (if any representatives are preserved).

Kali Linux i hax yous

Re: What do you think of E-democracy for America?

Re: What do you think of E-democracy for America?

this article starts off good goes off tangent wtf

Kali Linux i hax yous

Re: What do you think of E-democracy for America?

We certainly could use an internet version of the Bill of Rights, to prevent arrogant, over-confident companies like Google, Twitter, and Amazon that they don't have the right to dictate who gets to use their services freely and who is allowed to speak without fear of getting deleted or thrown out.

Re: What do you think of E-democracy for America?

If they build the platform then they can decide who gets to use it. They didn't create something that all of the sudden became a public service. They have always been private services that people decided to use. If you don't agree with their rules then you can decide to stop using them.

Re: What do you think of E-democracy for America?

The problem is, they have been playing both sides. Any time social media has been unfair to the little people, they claim they are a private company that can do whatever they want, and if people don't like it, they can leave.

However, when the government gets involved with investigations, they immediately change their gears and claim they are a public utility.

These evil social media giants have bee playing both sides for over a decade, and now they're getting too big for their britches.

Re: What do you think of E-democracy for America?

Switzerland has direct democracy.


https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/E-democracy#Electronic_direct_democracy

Electronic direct democracy
See also: Direct democracy

Proponents of E-democracy sometimes envision a transition from a representative democracy to a direct democracy carried out through technological means, and see this transition as an end goal of e-democracy.[84] In an Electronic direct democracy (EDD) (also known as open source governance or collaborative e-democracy), the people are directly involved in the legislative function by electronic means. Citizens electronically vote on legislation, author new legislation, and recall representatives (if any representatives are preserved).

Technology for supporting EDD has been researched and developed at the Florida Institute of Technology,[85] where the technology is used with student organizations. Numerous other software development projects are underway,[86] along with many supporting and related projects.[87] Several of these projects are now collaborating on a cross-platform architecture, under the umbrella of the Metagovernment project.[88]

EDD as a system is not fully implemented in a political government anywhere in the world, although several initiatives are currently forming. Ross Perot was a prominent advocate of EDD when he advocated "electronic town halls" during his 1992 and 1996 Presidential campaigns in the United States. Switzerland, already partially governed by direct democracy, is making progress towards such a system.[89] Senator On-Line, an Australian political party established in 2007, proposes to institute an EDD system so that Australians can decide which way the senators vote on each and every bill.[90] A similar initiative was formed 2002 in Sweden where the party Direktdemokraterna, running for the Swedish parliament, offers its members the power to decide the actions of the party over all or some areas of decision, or to use a proxy with immediate recall for one or several areas.

The first mainstream direct democracy party to be registered[when?] with any country's electoral commission [checked against each country's register] is the UK's People's Administration Direct Democracy party.[91] The People's Administration have developed and published the complete architecture for a legitimate reform to EDD [including the required Parliamentary reform process]. Established by musicians [including Alex Romane] and political activists, the People's Administration advocates using the web and telephone to enable the majority electorate to create, propose and vote upon all policy implementation. The People's Administration's blueprint has been published in various forms since 1998 and the People's Administration is the first direct democracy party to be registered in a vote-able format anywhere in the world - making the transition possible through evolution via election with legitimate majority support, instead of potentially through revolution via violence. The Direktdemokraterna party in Sweden also advocates EDD.
Liquid democracy
Main article: Liquid democracy

Liquid democracy, or direct democracy with delegable proxy, would allow citizens to choose a proxy to vote on their behalf while retaining the right to cast their own vote on legislation. The voting and the appointment of proxies could be done electronically. Taking this further, the proxies could form proxy chains, in which if A appoints B and B appoints C, and neither A nor B vote on a proposed bill but C does, C's vote will count for all three of them. Citizens could also rank their proxies in order of preference, so that if their first choice proxy fails to vote, their vote can be cast by their second-choice proxy.
Wikidemocracy

One proposed form of e-democracy is "wikidemocracy", with a government legislature whose codex of laws was an editable wiki, like Wikipedia. J Manuel Feliz-Teixeira believes we have the resources to implement wikidemocracy today. He envisions a wiki-system in which there would be three wings of legislative, executive and judiciary roles for which every citizen could have a voice with free access to the wiki and a personal ID to continuously reform policies until the last day of December (when all votes would be counted).[92] Advantages to wikidemocracy include a no-cost system with the removal of elections, no need for parliament or representatives because citizens directly represent themselves, and ease of access to voice one's opinion. However, there are obstacles, uncertainties and disagreements. First, the digital divide and low quality of education can be deterrents to achieve the full potential of a wikidemocracy. Similarly, there is a diffusion of innovation in response to new technologies in which some people readily adopt novel ways and others at the opposite end of the spectrum reject them or are slow to adapt.[93] It is also uncertain how secure this type of democracy would be because we would have to trust that the system administrator would have a high level of integrity to protect the votes saved to the public domain. Lastly, Peter Levine agrees that wikidemocracy would increase discussion on political and moral issues, but he disagrees with Feliz-Teixeira who argues that wikidemocracy would remove the need for representatives and formal governmental structures.[94]

Wikidemocracy is also used to mean more limited instantiations of e-democracy, such as in Argentina in August 2011, where the polling records of the presidential election were made available to the public in online form, for vetting.[95] The term has also been used in a more general way to refer to the democratic values and environments offered by wikis.[96]

Some in Finland recently undertook an experiment in wikidemocracy by creating a "shadow government program" on the Internet, essentially a compilation of the political views and aspirations of various groups in Finland, on a wiki.[97]

Kali Linux i hax yous
Top