Books : What's the deal with the language used in John Milton's Paradise Lost?

What's the deal with the language used in John Milton's Paradise Lost?




Excerpt

Thus Satan talking to his neerest Mate
With Head up-lift above the wave, and Eyes
That sparkling blaz'd, his other Parts besides
Prone on the Flood, extended long and large [ 195 ]
Lay floating many a rood, in bulk as huge
As whom the Fables name of monstrous size,
Titanian, or Earth-born, that warr'd on Jove,
Briareos or Typhon, whom the Den
By ancient Tarsus held, or that Sea-beast [ 200 ]
Leviathan, which God of all his works
Created hugest that swim th' Ocean stream:
Him haply slumbring on the Norway foam
The Pilot of some small night-founder'd Skiff,
Deeming some Island, oft, as Sea-men tell, [ 205 ]
With fixed Anchor in his skaly rind
Moors by his side under the Lee, while Night
Invests the Sea, and wished Morn delayes:
So stretcht out huge in length the Arch-fiend lay
Chain'd on the burning Lake, nor ever thence [ 210 ]
Had ris'n or heav'd his head, but that the will
And high permission of all-ruling Heaven
Left him at large to his own dark designs,
That with reiterated crimes he might
Heap on himself damnation, while he sought [ 215 ]
Evil to others, and enrag'd might see
How all his malice serv'd but to bring forth
Infinite goodness, grace and mercy shewn
On Man by him seduc't, but on himself
Treble confusion, wrath and vengeance pour'd. [ 220 ]
Forthwith upright he rears from off the Pool
His mighty Stature; on each hand the flames
Drivn backward slope thir pointing spires, and rowld
In billows, leave i'th' midst a horrid Vale.
Then with expanded wings he stears his flight [ 225 ]
Aloft, incumbent on the dusky Air
That felt unusual weight, till on dry Land
He lights, if it were Land that ever burn'd
With solid, as the Lake with liquid fire;
And such appear'd in hue, as when the force [ 230 ]
Of subterranean wind transports a Hill
Torn from Pelorus, or the shatter'd side
Of thundring Ætna, whose combustible
And fewel'd entrals thence conceiving Fire,
Sublim'd with Mineral fury, aid the Winds, [ 235 ]
And leave a singed bottom all involv'd
With stench and smoak: Such resting found the sole
Of unblest feet. Him followed his next Mate,
Both glorying to have scap't the Stygian flood
As Gods, and by thir own recover'd strength, [ 240 ]
Not by the sufferance of supernal Power.

http://www.dartmouth.edu/~milton/reading_room/pl/book_1/text.shtml

Am i the only one who finds this language hard to read or understand? Did the people in 17th century England really speak like that?

https://www.theatlantic.com/entertainment/archive/2017/03/whats-so-american-about-john-miltons-lucifer/519624/

It was only after William Blake's illustrations of Paradise Lost were published did John Milton gain post-posthumous fame

https://www.google.com/search?q=lucifer+in+paradise+lost&client=firefox-b&tbm=isch&sa=X&ved=0ahUKEwj37Y66n_7bAhXDaRQKHXtjAdwQ7AkIgwIoAQ&biw=1366&bih=603


I guess i am not the only one who suffered through reading John Milton's word quagmire, a descent into madness, blindness that he suffered.


IN PLAIN/MODERN ENGLISH:

http://www.paradiselost.org/lmg/Book-1.html

http://paradiselostinmodernenglish.blogspot.com/

https://jimbelton.wordpress.com/paradise-lost-in-modern-english/

What's the deal with you today?

Re: What's the deal with the language used in John Milton's Paradise Lost?

If you haven't read it in the original, you haven't read it.

Uh, look man. Make tool! Caveman. No fool!
I GameBoy - H. superior

Re: What's the deal with the language used in John Milton's Paradise Lost?

I've read it didn't like it. I prefer plain english version.

What's the deal with you today?

Re: What's the deal with the language used in John Milton's Paradise Lost?

It's like Shakespeare. You have to read it slow and absorb it.

Uh, look man. Make tool! Caveman. No fool!
I GameBoy - H. superior

Re: What's the deal with the language used in John Milton's Paradise Lost?

need to be in the right mindset, right mood, right situation

What's the deal with you today?

Re: What's the deal with the language used in John Milton's Paradise Lost?

Burn candles and kill a cat.

Uh, look man. Make tool! Caveman. No fool!
I GameBoy - H. superior

Re: What's the deal with the language used in John Milton's Paradise Lost?

kill a cat.

Satan answered quickly, I know it stinks to be under his power, but I'll tell you one thing–we will never do good deeds again. We'll get all our pleasure from doing evil, because it's the opposite of what he wants.
And if he tries to turn our evil actions into something good, we'll find another way to turn them into evil again.
And sometimes we'll succeed, and disrupt his plans and cause him a lot of grief.

But look around–the enemy forces have gone back to Heaven, and the storm that surrounded us is calm now.

Maybe his anger has been satisfied, or maybe he's turning his back on us in contempt–either way, let's take advantage of the opportunity.

See that dark barren plain over there?

Let's get out of these flames and go rest there–if we can get any rest in this miserable place.
Let's gather everybody there and decide how we can recover from this disaster and make more trouble for the enemy.

As Satan spoke to his companion only his head and blazing eyes were up above the flames.

The rest of his body was stretched out on the lake of fire like a big whale–the kind that sailors, they say, sometimes mistake for an island and spend the night anchored by its side.

What's the deal with you today?

Re: What's the deal with the language used in John Milton's Paradise Lost?

I don't believe in aliens. I believe in cosmic revolution.

Uh, look man. Make tool! Caveman. No fool!
I GameBoy - H. superior

Re: What's the deal with the language used in John Milton's Paradise Lost?

Describe this concept. You've mentioned it before many times. Start a thread and start posting your daily musings or whatever. Once it turns into a sizeable book of stature, publish it yourself or let me publish it for you under whatever pseudonym you desire.


You're wasting your talents on messageboards you should be writing books like i told gwnyc stygian patrick and others.

What's the deal with you today?

Re: What's the deal with the language used in John Milton's Paradise Lost?

"Farewell happy fields
Where Joy for ever dwells: hail horrors, hail
Infernal world" (1.249-51)

"How such united force of gods, how such
As stood like these, could ever know repulse?" (1.629-30)

"For who can yet believe, though after loss,
That all these puissant legions whose exile
Hath emptied Heav'n shall fail to re-ascend,
Self-raised, and repossess their native seat?" (1.631-4)

"Thus these two
Imparadis't in one anothers arms
The happier Eden, shall enjoy thir fill
Of bliss on bliss, while I to Hell am thrust,
Where neither joy, nor love, but fierce desire,
Among our other torments not the least,
Still unfulfill'd with pain of longing pines" ( IV.505-11)

"As when of old some Orator renound
In Athens or free Rome, where Eloquence
Flourishd, since mute, to some great cause addrest,
Stood in himself collected, while each part,
Motion, each act won audience ere the tongue
Sometimes in highth began, as no delay
Of Preface brooking through his Zeal of Right.
So standing, moving, or to highth upgrown
The Tempter all impassiond thus began" ( IX.670-8)

"Thus was the applause they meant
Turn'd to exploding hiss, triumph to shame
Cast on themselves from their own mouths" ( X.545-7)

Re: What's the deal with the language used in John Milton's Paradise Lost?

Hello…. Satan!

What's the deal with you today?
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