Classic Film : Favorite Billy Wilder films

Favorite Billy Wilder films

A master writer/director of both comedies and dramas. One of the greats.

My all-time favorites (random order):

Double Indemnity (1942)
The Apartment (1960)
Sabrina (1954)
Some Like it Hot (1959)

I admire "Sunset Boulevard" greatly, but for some reason I never warmed to it as others have.

Re: Favorite Billy Wilder films

Hi, Spider!

Double Indemnity and Sunset Blvd are in constant competition for most-favored-status with me among Wilder's films. I've long since lost count of the number of times I've seen either, and both are among a handful of films I'll watch anytime, anywhere and never tire of.

I know what you mean about not warming to a film; although I recognize its qualities, I'm that way with Some Like It Hot. Although I don't think it's near as good a film overall, I'm more inclined to choose The Seven Year Itch for viewing enjoyment, between the two.

Generally, I'm not much on classifying favorites, per se; my gauge is more in the nature of those I'm likely to watch most frequently (perhaps it amounts to the same thing). Topping that list after the first two citations is Witness For the Prosecution. Immediately following might be Sabrina. Odd that three adaptations of stage plays should figure so highly among my most-watched-Wilders. Perhaps it's because, relieved of the heavier lifting of crafting an original screenplay or adapting from a novel, he could concentrate on bringing his senses of style and fun to extant performance vehicles.

But at any given time, I'm probably equally likely to gravitate to The Lost Weekend. There's a tight cohesiveness to it that's quite gripping in its similarity to Double Indemnity: they both grab you by the throat and hold you; Sunset Blvd does something similar, but in a more slowly seductive way in which, like Joe, you find yourself in deep before you realize it (well I do, anyway).

A Foreign Affair is good fun, and it's probably not surprising that that should be something that Wilder and Dietrich seemed to bring out in each other (as they did in WFTP). Jean Arthur really soaks up that spirit in so mischievously subsuming her earnest, All-American good-gal image to that of the rigid yet vulnerable Congresswoman.

The Apartment's fine (and I always enjoy when genial Fred MacMurray exposes his "inner heel"), but there's a bleak, hard and somewhat bitter edge to it that often emerged in Wilder's collaborations with I.A.L. Diamond (especially acute in Love In the Afternoon, Irma La Douce and The Fortune Cookie). An exception to this are the colorful fantasies of The Private Life Of Sherlock Holmes, for which I have more fondness than most viewers.

I've never seen any Wilder film made before that one that I consider poor, and there are many things to appreciate in each, to varying degrees. I'm sorry to say I found all of his post-1970 output labored in the extreme (something I'd apply as well to One, Two Three but for the dynamism and velocity of Cagney, which has managed to sustain it sufficiently for several viewings, and without which I think I'd find it intolerable).

To sum up, there it is, Wilder-wise (as C.C. Baxter would say): two addictive masterpieces (Double Indemnity and Sunset Blvd) and three reliable joys (Witness For the Prosecution, Sabrina and The Lost Weekend).

Re: Favorite Billy Wilder films

Hi, Doghouse! Good to see you here.

And thanks for the wonderful post. Truth be told, there's hardly a Wilder film (save, for me, the post 1960 ones) that I don't really enjoy, if not to some degree love. I have to confess, however, that I'm not a fan of The Seven Year Itch, which seems so un-cinematic to me that I just can't get past that disqualifier. And I never really liked Love in the Afternoon either, perhaps for the reasons you mention, though those elements don't bother me at all in The Apartment. So who knows?

With those exceptions, I'm a huge fan of so many of his other masterful works, especially Ace in the Hole, Lost Weekend, Witness for the Prosecution, The Major and the Minor, and Stalag 17.

But my true favorites (reliable joys as you put it; love that term) are Double Indemnity, The Apartment, Sabrina, and Some Like it Hot, films that I can and will watch again and again - especially Double Indemnity, which I also feel is a masterpiece. (And for the record, I do and will always watch Sunset Boulevard just to study its cinematic brilliance. Who knows, maybe one of these days I'll even come to love it.)

Thanks for the great reply.

Re: Favorite Billy Wilder films

Well, maybe we can liven this place up. I'm happy to keep trying.

I'm not a fan of The Seven Year Itch, which seems so un-cinematic to me that I just can't get past that disqualifier.
Indeed, that's a weakness, but one that I find counteracted by its undemanding atmosphere of good-natured satire. Its stage roots really show in ways that don't plague Sabrina and Witness For the Prosecution quite so obviously, but Wilder wisely lets the text carry the day, resulting in - along with The Major And the Minor - one of his most gentle and affectionate comedies.

I never really liked Love in the Afternoon either, perhaps for the reasons you mention, though those elements don't bother me at all in The Apartment. So who knows?
Perhaps it's something for which I didn't give The Apartment credit in my earlier comments: beneath its cynicism, it has a good heart. In spite of those other characteristics I mentioned, there is a sweetness to it that never quite emerges from Love In the Afternoon. I never get the sense that Wilder wants us to root for Cooper and/or Hepburn either as individuals or as a couple as he clearly does for Lemmon and MacLaine.

Ace In the Hole is one I haven't yet been able to make up my mind about. It's terribly brutal in its view of some aspects of humanity, although they're portrayed in intriguing ways, and I admit it deserves a few more repeat viewings for me to adequately evaluate it.

And for the record, I do and will always watch Sunset Boulevard just to study its cinematic brilliance. Who knows, maybe one of these days I may come to love it. Admire it, I surely do.
This is one of Wilder's darker exercises that also displays heart, and it may be unique among them in that there's not a single character who doesn't evoke sympathy of one or more sorts; although there's plenty of antagonism between them in their situations, there are no antagonists (much less villains). Each is a protagonist with whose pain and yearning we can identify in some way.

It's certainly one of Wilder's most atmospheric pieces (which appeals greatly to me), working on multiple levels with both the integration and clashes of, shall we say, Norma's world of the past and Joe's of the present, the latter of which is now - ironically - more distant from our viewpoint than Norma's was from Joe's at the '49-'50 point of its production…which adds another level of appeal: that distance now applies 67 years of what antique dealers call "patina" to what nevertheless remains the optimistic vitality of Joe and Betty's story - in contrast to the stifling and desperate stagnation of Norma's - and what was already a thematically rich examination of insular but connected existences at the time of its release.

I'd better stop myself here; SB is one of those films about which I can just go on and on once I get started.

Re: Favorite Billy Wilder films

Thanks for another great post, Doghouse. Your comments are so insightful and elegantly written, as usual. I'm glad we agree to some extent about Love in the Afternoon. I also feel it's hard to root for Cooper and Hepburn as a couple. I think he just seems far too old for her; a premise I can't accept.

As for Ace in the Hole, it's not a film I can watch a lot, because of its darkness, but personally I think it's one of Wilder's other great films. For those who don't know, it was inspired by a true story of a miner in Kentucky in the 1920s, Floyd Collins, who suffered the same fate (and media circus). There have been several renditions of his story in various mediums, but I think Wilder's is probably the most incisive and best.

And I think I need to watch Sunset Boulevard again to see if I can determine why I fail to connect with it. I have a feeling that it may be purely a cinematic flaw for me - with a few exceptions, it has a lack of visual dynamics; much is shot from eye level, and I suspect that that unconsciously invokes my disengagement. I'll watch it again sometime soon to see if that's it, or something else. I do love the cast and the story, so I don't know what else it could be.

Oh, I did want to comment on your comment about antagonisms as opposed to an antagonist: sometimes it's true in great literature that there is no real antagonist, per se. In that case, in my view, it usually means that the landscape of the narrative itself is the real antagonist - the trap that each character finds himself in. A Streetcar Named Desire is an example of that. There really are no "villians" in that. Every character is a protagonist in his or her own way, and the circumstances of their lives at the moment are the antagonist for them. This writing is the most difficult but, in my opinion, often the best.

As a side note, it reminds me of something Kazan once said, and one of the reasons he was such a great director: That when directing, he always looked for the bad in every "good" character, and for the good in every "bad" character. That combination always creates a sustaining internal conflict that makes the characters so much more interesting and authentic. As it says in the Bible (Hebrews somewhere): "Every way of man is right in his own eyes."

Re: Favorite Billy Wilder films

I'm a bit embarrassed to say I've seen Ace In the Hole just once, and only a couple years ago. I'm not sure what took me so long to get around to it, and I really am eager for another viewing or two to study it more analytically.

Very interesting observation about the visual dynamics of Sunset Blvd, and one over which I intend to mull. Right off the bat, something that strikes me is the equal importance of the way it sounds, not only in the evocative nature of Franz Waxman's score, but the way in which extended sequences of narration subliminally yet appropriately impose silence upon the action, providing commentary in much the same way that intertitles had in Norma's pre-talkie days.

…sometimes it's true in great literature that there is no real antagonist, per se. In that case, in my view, it usually means that the landscape of the narrative itself is the real antagonist - the trap that each character finds himself in.
I believe I recall you pointing that out on another thread a while back, and I'm grateful for the reminder. Alfred Hitchcock liked to say that the best villains made the best pictures, but it's worth bearing in mind that the non-human, situational antagonists you describe can make for the most involving and compelling drama.

Re: Favorite Billy Wilder films

Thanks for you insightful comments, Doghouse. And you of all people shouldn't be embarrassed about not seeing something more than once. That honor clearly belongs to me.

Anyway. Now you've got me really intrigued about the element of sound in Sunset Boulevard. I never thought of that before, and it's a compelling idea to ponder. I have to see the film again. Maybe by deconstructing it, I can reconstruct it in a way that makes it more emotionally palatable to me. Your idea of the use sound as silence alone is a good beginning.

And I'm glad you agree with me about, as you put it, situational antagonists. One of the reasons I think this is so effective in so many cases (certain genres doubtless excepted), is because it embodies the notion of ambivalence, one of the most critical components of creating internal conflicts, and internal conflicts in characters are powerful drivers of narrative arcs. Were I still young and still in college, I might consider a thesis on this subject. But for now I'll stop. I do appreciate your interest and comments though.

P.S. I think I'm late in responding; sorry for that. I don't get notified here (yet), so if I don't post right away, just know that I will. Btw, I don't know how to set my clock here, so the time on this post is totally wrong.

Re: Favorite Billy Wilder films

Last things first: you need never concern yourself on my account with length of time for a reply; not a problem on this end. BTW, have you set your profile for notifications? Been working well for me thus far.

That thought about sound vs silence is one that occurred to me only upon considering your observations about SB's visuals. One might automatically draw the obvious parallel to Double Indemnity, as telegonus has in remarking on the similarity of their narrative frameworks, but I'd guess that Wilder had no conscious intention of exploiting any thematic connection to "silent action" in those sequences, and any such evocation was merely a serendipitous accident.

The context for Walter's DI narration is established with his beginning the dictaphone recordings, and as we know, Wilder had indeed initially established just such a context with SB's deleted morgue scene. The failure of that scene to work and its subsequent elimination all just happened to benefit the picture.

Which raises a question that often comes to my mind when studying such subtleties within a given film: how much was intentional, how much was purely luck and how much the result of something instinctual, of which the director and/or writer may not even have been aware but, somehow, sensed was the right thing to do? It may be a romantic notion, but I like to think that last quality is among the inscrutable things that set the truly brilliant directors apart.

The reasons a film whose value we can recognize but which nevertheless fails to connect with, move or warm us are probably at least as inscrutable. There are some such films I've simply given up on, but others I've allowed, "Well, just one more chance" and, by gosh, they finally "click" for me as they hadn't before. Beat the Devil is one of my favorite examples; two or three viewings had left me cold, and that "one more chance" was inexplicably the one that allowed me to, shall we say, find my way into it and fully access its charms.

Re: Favorite Billy Wilder films

Beautiful post, Doghouse. I agree with you about everything. In particular, this:

Which raises a question that often comes to my mind when studying such subtleties within a given film: how much was intentional, how much was purely luck and how much the result of something instinctual, of which the director and/or writer may not even have been aware but, somehow, sensed was the right thing to do? It may be a romantic notion, but I like to think that last quality is among the inscrutable things that set the truly brilliant directors apart.

In my experience, I believe the greatest works are a combination of all these things, with the added inspirations of the actors, of course. In the final analysis, it's a transcendence in which the whole is greater than the sum of its parts. That's what we all strive for, and when it happens it is indeed inscrutable. It's a magical and mysterious consequence of the art of it all. Don't know how to say it better.

DI & SB

Yet another great post, Doghouse. 🙂

I think that a weakness of Sunset Blvid that DI doesn't possess lies in a kind of persistent datedness (yes, I hate the word dated, too, but sometimes you've gotta do what you've gotta do…). The time frame of the film (1950) and the inevitable twenty years distance, roughly, between the end of the silent era and the start of the talkies, makes if inevitably a product of a very specific time and place in a way that the noirish DI isn't, which truly is serendipitous inasmuch as the Noir era is frozen in time retroactively, courtesy of the French critics, so Wilder couldn't have known how snugly his film would fit into what we now think of as a major genre, the word for which had yet to be used in America.

SB, a more hot of the presses movie (sic), must have knocked 'em out in Beverly Hills and Bel-Air when it first came out, and played nicely into the historical memories of most grownup moviegoers of its year of release, is now, alas, cluttered with issues as repo men, references to then current stars like Alan Ladd and Betty Hutton in Holden's pitch to studio suit Fred Clark (he even mentioneds "Bill" Demarest!); and even Rudolph Valentino and other silent stars, some of whose names still resonate, while others don't. Heck, how well known is Gloria Swanson these days even with Sunset Blvd in her filmography? Such "posterity issues" are difficult to gauge when it comes to making movies, even now (how "relevant" are such Boomer classics as The Graduate and Easy Rider to Millennials?).

What made SB so relevant in its day now dates it, right down to the visit to Paramount and Cecil B. DeMille, so thrilling for moviegoers of what's now nearing seventy years ago, likely (though I can't say for sure) a big "meh" for younger viewers who know the Paramount logo from television and the occasional movie; nor the studio and its and back lot, as a discrete entity; or even the movie theater chain, still a strong memory for some of us, if independently owned by the time we came along, now fading from living memory. DI is, in contrast, one lucky movie. Old-fashioned in its "particulars" (being in black and white, dictaphones, old cars, no television), otherwise very alive and spanking new aside from the jargon of the period in which it was made.

Alas, such things as what makes one movie feel a bit creaky and another fresh as a daisy are not things that even the most gifted film-makers can anticipate, now or then. I think of how excruciating I found watching even the Great Chaplin's The Great Dictator and Monsieur Verdoux was, for me anyway. I could finish viewing either film. It was too painful, and neither struck me as the least bit funny. On the other hand, I find that Orson Welles' films do hold up, including Citizen Kane, which still feels fresh and exciting after all these years, but that's me.

Re: Favorite Billy Wilder films

Thanks, tel, for those valuable observations; they speak to what I was trying to impart in an earlier post (if you'll forgive my quoting myself), but from a differing point of view that especially interests me:
It's certainly one of Wilder's most atmospheric pieces (which appeals greatly to me), working on multiple levels with both the integration and clashes of, shall we say, Norma's world of the past and Joe's of the present, the latter of which is now - ironically - more distant from our viewpoint than Norma's was from Joe's at the '49-'50 point of its production…which adds another level of appeal: that distance now applies 67 years of what antique dealers call "patina" to what nevertheless remains the optimistic vitality of Joe and Betty's story - in contrast to the stifling and desperate stagnation of Norma's - and what was already a thematically rich examination of insular but connected existences at the time of its release.
I suppose "patina" can be taken as merely a lipstick-on-a-pig substitute for "dated," and certainly the references that seemed so current in 1950 do have that effect. I'm nevertheless struck by how recognizable and relatable to today many elements remain, as reflected, for instance, in your remark, "Holden's pitch to studio suit Fred Clark;" the names - and the slang - may change, but there's constancy in the against-the-odds struggle of those seeking to make a name for themselves, as well as in the industry's penchant for obsolescence and disposability of the once-great.

Norma intended no ironic humor - even if Wilder and Brackett did - when she said,"And who have we got today? Some nobodies:" Ladd, Hutton…Holden?. That they may be as forgotten now as "The Gilberts, the Fairbankses, the Valentinos" were in 1950 reinforces one of the script's most brutally frank points: one era's "Norma Desmond" or Gloria Swanson becomes another's Alan Ladd or Betty Hutton, or yet another's Meg Ryan or Debra Winger. Plus ça change, plus c'est la même chose.

Likewise, the studio atmosphere with its class divisions between "royalty" and "peons" - and the camaraderie of the latter ("What's wrong with being on the other side of the camera? It's really more fun") - felt just as fresh to me when I worked in those surroundings 20-to-30-odd years later as they must have to 1950 audiences. As did - and do - the make-or-break ambitions of some of those peons. I remember working with two such people (lowly film-traffic clerks in the Post Production department) who hammered out sitcom scripts in their free time and whose dream was, as the male half of that duo described it to me, to become "the real-life Sally Rogers and Buddy Sorrell." And indeed before another decade had passed, they were an Emmy-winning writer/producer team (remaining so well into this century).

I'll admit it may be something approaching idiosyncrasy on my part that imposes romanticism upon what another viewer may find dated, but it's that very romanticism that burnishes Sunset Blvd's attractions for this one as the years go by, in much the same way as a dramatization of medieval palace intrigue can provide sly commentary on contemporary politics.

I'm with you all the way on Double Indemnity, and I'm certain that its 1938 setting was chosen as a compromise between the 1935 one of the novella and its 1943 period of production to make it as contemporary as possible without the complication of wartime references. I'm stretching a point, but it was already a "period piece" at the time of its release. Nevertheless, themes of lust, greed and betrayal remain timeless.

I won't say that Wilder and Brackett were intending anything forward-looking, but Sunset Blvd invites an inference: this is the way the industry's always been, for both the has-been and the never-was, and there's no reason to assume it's going to change. I do believe it's significant that any mention of television was avoided. Very few films of the era about the other performing arts could resist a jab or two in its direction, but my sense is that they wished to preserve the purity of the narrative as much as possible - just as they'd done with DI's pre-war setting - to focus on the themes of the hopefulness of youth and despair of its loss, and the cynical expediency at which the two can intersect in such an insular business.

So I guess all I'm saying is that the very aspects of SB that date it for you are among those that make it what I might call "romantically relevant" for me: it spoke not only to an era gone by but now, unintentionally, to another such era, providing commentary on both that still rings true.

What it suggests about the magic of the movies is something our friend ecarle might express as "your Sunset Blvd isn't my Sunset Blvd." I'd never try to talk anyone out of theirs; I can only share what I see in mine. Who's to say if one person's resonance is of any more value than another's quaintness?

Re: Favorite Billy Wilder films

If I may chime in, Spider…

With Doghouse, I'm a huge fan of Sunset Boulevard, though I must say it took me several viewings to warm up to it as well (same, for me, with Hitchcock's Marnie–and I've never warned up to Psycho, as you know).

As for favorites… I'm having difficulty with that old chestnut, the best-favorite distinction, at the moment. For example, I recognize that Double Indemnity, The Lost Weekend, and Ace in the Hole are all marvellous films, and I like them a great deal. With that said, I may prefer the simpler, more immediately comic pleasures of The Major and the Minor, A Foreign Affair, Witness for the Prosecution, and One, Two, Three. (I neglected to put Some Like It Hot because, while it's "more immediately comic," it is certainly not "simpler" than those cited before.) Favorites, then? I'll probably end up with a combination between "favorites" and "best." Errr…

I'll try to limit myself to five:

Five Graves to Cairo (perhaps a guilty pleasure, but I enjoy this one a great deal–both for the plotting and for the performances. Probably tied with The Major and the Minor, though.)

Double Indemnity (need I really write anything? 😉)

Sunset Boulevard (a masterly portrayal of obsession, and a fascinating character-study–part thriller, part drama, brilliant dialogue)

Some Like It Hot (they say it's the funniest film of all time. My first reaction is to disagree just because I dislike such sweeping generalizations, but–then–I can't immediately think of another film for that title!)

The Private Life of Sherlock Holmes (Sarris said this was Wilder's autumnal elegy, and I must agree: this picture reveals the Lubitschean romanticist still lurking beneath every one of Wilder's films, and does so in a funny and charming way. I cannot fathom why the mainstream critics didn't much like it at the time, but I think it may just be the best Holmes film of them all.)

Re: Favorite Billy Wilder films

Hi, Salzmank! Good to see you here.

And oh, I know the burden of best vs. favorite choices all too well! But I've reached the stage in life when I'm all for whatever pleases one the most. That's why I can admire Sunset Boulevard tremendously, even though I've never really warmed to it. And why I can feel that Citizen Kane is a masterpiece, but love watching The Magnificent Ambersons so much more.

And I appreciate all your choices, except for The Private Life of Sherlock Holmes, which I haven't seen. Given yours and Doghouse's appreciation for it, however, it seems clear that it's one that I should see. I love your elegant description of it. Maybe one of these days, if it ever shows up on TCM.

Thanks so much for the post.

Re: Favorite Billy Wilder films

All of the films mentioned, Spider, can't add more to it than you've already done but my all-time fave has to be Some Like It Hot.

Some Like it Hot

Thanks, mike. Good to see you here. And, yes, for comedies Some Like It Hot is my first choice, too. What a filmmaker Wilder was!

No Real Surprises

No real surprises from me: Double Indemnity is numero uno in my book. The perfect narration of Fred MacMurray, he screen chemistry with Barbara Stanwyck and Edward G. Robinson (yes, they work beautifully off one another, and their scenes together are a joy). Miklos Rozsa's pulsating score is a huge plus. Why this over the more classic seeming Sunset Blvd? I can't explain it.

I would put Sunset Blvd as my number 2 from Wilder, and it's a very great film and a classic in a way wholly different from DI, though in their narrative framing they're similar. The criticism of the studio system seems almost too harsh to my ears and brain but that's me. Those studios got the job done, and they were far from than "dream factories". They were like artist studios, where not just actors, writers and directors toiled but also sound men, editors, art directors, musicians and so many others whose efforts make a movie great work as well.

After that, it almost doesn't matter. I'm a fan of Stalag 17 and of William Holden's performance in it, and I know that for a number of reasons the story had to be fleshed out with guys like Harvey Lembeck and Robert Strauss, but it does have many draggy moments. The last half-hour and, especially, fifteen minutes, save it. Also up there: Some Like It Hot It's not my favorite comedy by a long shot but it's a grand farce; and it's lovely to look at,–and no, not just for Marilyn–the scenes in wintry Chicago, on the train to Florida, in that old hotel. Terrific supporting cast, too, and all in good form.

I admit to not being a huge fan of the Wilder-Jack Lemmon collaborations, though I respect the work they did together. For some reason Irma La Douce shines in my memories. It's my favorite Jack Lemmon performance, and of all his screen work it's the performance that makes me understand why silent screen comedian Harold Lloyd was such a big Lemmon fan and that he even stated that if there were ever to be a movie biography of his life Jack was his first choice to star in it.

Of Wilder's mid-career efforts I like Witness For The Prosecution a great deal. The man showed on a number of occasions that he had Hitchcock potential, and this is yet another example of it. The ending is a shocker and well worth the wait. Wilder often seemed to save his best for last. It was an adaptation, but then a lot of his films were, and so many of them feature great, dramatic, larger than life endings. The man really loved the movies and loved making them, and it showed. He liked to go out a winner; and so he did.

Re: No Real Surprises.

Thanks so much, tele. And I agree with you about almost everything, except even though I agree that Sunset Boulevard is a masterpiece, I just can't get as emotionally involved in it as I would like.

For me, too, Double Indemnity is numero uno. It doesn't get better than that, imo. (Love the brilliant James Cain novel, too. Worth a read if you haven't read it already.)

And I haven't seen it since it was released, so I might feel differently today, but for whatever reason I don't remember being a big fan of Irma La Douce. Didn't dislike it; just didn't love it. On the other hand I loved Lemmon and MacLaine in The Apartment. So based upon your insightful comments, I think I need to see it again. If it ever shows up on TCM, I'll be sure to do so. I might have a very different reaction today.

The man really loved the movies and loved making them, and it showed. He liked to go out a winner; and so he did.

Oh, so true!

Re: Favorite Billy Wilder films

Double Indemnity is numero uno. It doesn't get better than that, imo. (Love the brilliant James Cain novel, too. Worth a read if you haven't read it already.)
Cain packs quite a story into those, what is it, 110 pages? To those who haven't read it, I like to recommend it in combination with an immediate viewing (or re-viewing) of the film. Together, they provide an encapsulated master class on the crafting of a screenplay: what's eliminated and what's retained; the streamlining that results in sharpened focus upon the latter; the literary genesis of devices transposed into cinematic ones; the development of themes and/or characters beyond that which is presented on the page to suit the demands of dramatic balance; the reasons for all those choices.

My remarks on The Caine Mutiny on, y'know, The Other Board point to what can be the disadvantages of adapting novels for the screen; Double Indemnity can serve as a perhaps rare example of such an adaptation improving on the original work.

Re: Favorite Billy Wilder films

Without any order:

Double Indemnity
The Appartment
Some Like it Hot
The Seven Year Itch

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Re: Favorite Billy Wilder films

Double Indemnity (1944)
I would've killed for Phyllis and I'm gay. 🙃
Sunset Boulevard
The Seven Year Itch
Some Like it Hot

fka Ethel Mertz
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