Classic Film : Favourite SNOW (and ice) in classic films

Re: Favourite SNOW (and ice) in classic films

I immediately thought of the ice skating scene in The Bishop's Wife, with Cary Grant and Loretta Young.


That's right! You're about to be killed by a zamboni!

Re: Favourite SNOW (and ice) in classic films

Re: Favourite SNOW (and ice) in classic films

Maybe someone has mentioned it,but "The Eiger Sanction " has some great climbing in Snow and Ice scenes.

Re: Favourite SNOW (and ice) in classic films

No, I don't think anybody has mentioned it yet. I like it.

-------

OT: Temperature last night where we live: minus 10º (ten) centigrade.

Snow: abundant.


Re: Favourite SNOW (and ice) in classic films

I know that Christmas movies are just too snowy to even bother mentioning but will anyway


A Christmas Story (1983)

The over-wrapped horrible little brother can't get up after he falls in the snow.

The tongue freezing to the schoolyard pole.






And there's always La marche de l'empereur (2005) The March of the Penguins, that is.
🐧🐧🐧🐧🐧


Re: Favourite SNOW (and ice) in classic films

The snow that overpowers the poppies in The Wizard of Oz is literally magical, so I'll choose that one.



"Professor Marvel never guesses - he knows!"

Re: Favourite SNOW (and ice) in classic films

Professor M...

Did you see the snow covered clip to that one a page or so back ?
Best to bundle up before checking it out.

Re: Favourite SNOW (and ice) in classic films

The "bear man" scene in True Grit (2010):

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Rxm5e4EI_MA

Re: Favourite SNOW (and ice) in classic films

Dr. Zhivago was the first one I thought of, too.

Also:
Never Cry Wolf
The Snow Queen.


Not a classic, but lots of ice in Frozen.





Don't blame me, I voted for Hillary.

Re: Favourite SNOW (and ice) in classic films

Dr. Zhivago has the Gold Medal of this thread beyond any doubt. Had I extended my OP to ten titles, I would have included it, of course.

I had totally forgotten 'Cry Wolf' until you reminded me.

There are several films with the title 'The Snow Queen'. Do you refer to the 2013 one?

As for 'Frozen' (the animation one, 2013?), I haven't seen it.




Re: Favourite SNOW (and ice) in classic films

The version of Snow Queen I saw was 1967.


Don't blame me, I voted for Hillary.

Re: Favourite SNOW (and ice) in classic films

Lots of excellent choices made already, in all kinds of genres...but not so many that I've seen in science fiction. So here's some wholly or partially snow- or ice-bound sci-fi classics (and not-so-classics) from the 50s and 60s, including one you named in your OP, Aloysius; apologies for any other repeats....

The Flying Saucer
The Thing From Another World
Flight to Mars
Red Planet Mars
The Beast From 20,000 Fathoms
The Snow Creature
Jujin yuki otoko/Half Human
Gojira no gyakushu/Godzilla Raids Again
Conquest of Space
World Without End
Man Beast
The Deadly Mantis
The Abominable Snowman/The Abominable Snowman of the Himalayas
The Blob
The Lost Missile
Queen of Outer Space
The Trollenberg Terror/The Crawling Eye
Rymdinvasion i Lapland/Terror in the Midnight Sun
Beast From Haunted Cave
The Atomic Submarine
12 to the Moon
Voyage to the Bottom of the Sea
Journey to the Seventh Planet
Kingu Kongu tai Gojira/King Kong vs. Godzilla
Robinson Crusoe on Mars


Snow and ice are convenient settings for monsters and aliens, it seems.

Re: Favourite SNOW (and ice) in classic films

An interesting and very useful list, hobnob, thanks. I know and have seen most of them. Not the first Japanese one, 'The Lost Missile', '12 to the Moon' (snow and/or ice on the Moon??). 'Rymdinvasion i Lapland/Terror in the Midnight Sun ' is an American-Swedish film—and there aren't many!—also known as 'Invasion of the Animal People'.


Snow and ice are convenient settings for monsters and aliens, it seems.


Yes, and quite understandably. I would include Superman (who, let's not forget it, WAS an alien before he became, quite naturally, a U.S. citizen) because of his peculiar frozen 'mansion' . Also this (1942!): https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=J5M1A_OQaaM and this: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3cyzfd4mBTw .





Re: Favourite SNOW (and ice) in classic films

Thanks, Aloysius. The first Japanese film, Jujin yuki otoko (1955), is about the discovery of what amounts to an abominable snowman in the mountains of Japan, directed by Ishiro Honda; the title translates simply "Monster Snowman". It's been locked away in Toho's vaults for over 30 years because of political pressure from the Ainu, who claim the lost tribe of deformed mountain people in the film are a racist slander against them, even though the people in the film are not Ainu and live on Honshu, while the Ainu live on Hokkaido. But a few so-so copies have seeped out. The heavily edited American version, Half Human, with insert scenes with John Carradine, is available and gives a few hints of the strength of the original.

The Lost Missile (1958) is about an alien rocket that is knocked by a defensive missile blast into a five-mile-high orbit about the Earth, traveling at 4000 miles per hour and because of the heat from friction burns up everything in a 15-mile-wide swath. It's racing across Canada toward New York and must be shot down. In a couple of scenes it evaporates snow-clad mountains with its heat. Not a bad low-budgeter with Robert Loggia; it could have used more money.

In 12 to the Moon (1960) the moon people freeze North America, for some goofy reason. But they relent and un-freeze it.

Rymdinvasion i Lapland ("Space Invasion of Lappland") was supposed to be distributed in the US in its original form in 1958 but for some reason never was. Instead, the worthless, untalented filmmaker Jerry Warren, who specialized in taking foreign films and hacking them up into various forms of messes, got hold of it and proceeded to do what he did best. The result, Invasion of the Animal People, released in 1962, was so incomprehensible that no one could make sense of it. Among other things, the characters in his American insert scenes keep referring to Sweden as "Switzerland", even showing a map of Switzerland in one scene, although in the scenes left over from the original everyone refers to the country as Sweden. Great movie-making starts with attention to detail.

Re: Favourite SNOW (and ice) in classic films

You're welcome, hobnob. Thank you for your comments and data about those films I have not seen and knew nothing about. I have seen many Godzilla & Co (monsters, extraterrestrials and the like), but my problem is that I don't remember the Japanese titles and often confuse them.

(or LOL, as "they" say nowadays). The Sweden/Switzerland confusion is hilarious! Well, both countries have been neutral for the last 200 years, both are rich and both have a lot of snow, but apart from that they are so different in history, geography, climate, language, political regime, pychology, cinema... Ah, I admit they have another thing in common: both Anita Ekberg and Ursula Andress were really beautiful and sexy women!! .


Great movie-making starts with attention to detail.


Yeah... That's a source of continuous frustrations for me.










Re: Favourite SNOW (and ice) in classic films

Has ICE STATION ZEBRA been named yet? It was the favorite picture of film connoisseur Howard Hughes.

Take 'em to Missouri

Re: Favourite SNOW (and ice) in classic films

This is a very long thread, but I seem to remember that someone did. Not exactly my favourite, but I like it and have seen it or parts thereof many, many times, because they often show it on TV and the temptation is too strong.

I also know very well the submarine, USS Ronquil, SS-396, and her story, and met once a Spanish Navy officer who had served on her when she became a Spanish submarine, the Isaac Peral S-32.
She had a long life: 1943- 1984, forty-one (iike oarsman Judah Ben-Hur) years, not too bad for a submarine! https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/USS_Ronquil_(SS-396)



Re: Favourite SNOW (and ice) in classic films

Mention of Ice Station Zebra, a film I've never been able to sit through, reminds me of The Bedford Incident – a fine Cold War thriller that is overlooked, probably because it was released not long after Dr Strangelove and Fail Safe. (The former has some snow as Major Kong flies low over Russia.)

Re: Favourite SNOW (and ice) in classic films

The Bedford Incident is a much better film, of course. I like it very much. By the way, I read somewhere that that was the first time a black actor played a character whose race and colour were not relevant or even mentioned at all. That made me think of James Edwards as USAF pilot Lieutenant Maples in 'Battle Hymn' (1957), arguably the first black officer in an American film.





Re: Favourite SNOW (and ice) in classic films


The Bedford Incident is a much better film, of course. I like it very much. By the way, I read somewhere that that was the first time a black actor played a character whose race and colour were not relevant or even mentioned at all.


That's right, Aloysius. I first saw that pointed out by the late Leslie Halliwell in his Film Guide back in the 70s. I had seen The Bedford Incident several times by then and while I noticed Poitier's race was never mentioned I never thought about its relevance to his overall career. I put this down to Poitier's pal Richard Widmark, who produced the picture. Widmark had starred in Poitier's first film, No Way Out (1950), and Sidney always said that Widmark was the only white actor to befriend him and have him to his house in those early years in "liberal" Hollywood.

Very good film, with an early performance by Donald Sutherland (one of the sick bay attendants). No snow, but some ice.

Re: Favourite SNOW (and ice) in classic films

I took a look at my Halliwell's and it reads "his [Sidney Poitier's] first role with no reference to his colour", but I seem to remember that I also read somewhere the same thing but referred to black actors in general. Important actors, of course. But please don't ask me where I read that, hobnob, because my namesake, Doktor Aloysius Alzheimer, advised me to avoid strenuous mental efforts...


Re: Favourite SNOW (and ice) in classic films

There's a long reference to 'Ice Station Zebra' on the thread 'Ernest Borgnine at 100'
http://www.imdb.com/board/bd0000010/nest/265386113?d=265406729#265406729


Re: Favourite SNOW (and ice) in classic films

The snow just looked too phony in Ice Station Zebra.

Re: Favourite SNOW (and ice) in classic films

The Pink Panther, skiing scenes at Cortina D'Ampezzo
Downhill Racer more skiing

Re: Favourite SNOW (and ice) in classic films

The scene in both "Let Me In" and "Let the Right One In" when the boy meets the "vampire child" for the first time. Its outside the apartment building and its cold and there is snow on the ground.

I will never let you part, for you are always in my heart: MJ
turn to page 394: Snape (nasty woman)

Re: Favourite SNOW (and ice) in classic films

Not mentioned before because it's not a favorite film, but Gorky Park had a lot of snow. Apparently was filmed in Finland during winter, with one of the most important scenes taking place at an outdoor skating rink.

Re: Favourite SNOW (and ice) in classic films

I forgot about Gorky Park, I never see it on TV, I'll have too see if I can find it on DVD. I loved both the book and the movie. Thanks for mentioning it, you know the old saying "out of sight, out of mind".

I will never let you part, for you are always in my heart: MJ
turn to page 394: Snape (nasty woman)

Re: Favourite SNOW (and ice) in classic films

The Chronicles of Narnia: The Lion, the Witch and the Wardrobe (2005)

And for Tilda, Elton & Kiki singing Snow Queen

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rLIfUClKtOo

Re: Favourite SNOW (and ice) in classic films

IMDb is very glitchy tonight. I tried several times to get that link to post. Not sure if The Chronicals of Narnia were mentioned before as I did see Tilda's name mentioned. Sorry if that was what they were referring to, but I think it was another film. Nested but it wasn't quite clear.

Wanted to add DOWNHILL RACER, a film I love with I'm in the mood for fireplaces, hot chocolate and watching skiing. And KLONDIKE ANNIE, with Mae West.

And IDIOT'S DELIGHT, with the original ending..

SEVEN BRIDES FOR SEVEN BROTHERS, and CALL OF THE WILD.

Re: Favourite SNOW (and ice) in classic films

Some others I haven't seen mentioned....

Northern Pursuit (1943), with Errol Flynn chasing Nazis in Canada.

Nicholas and Alexandra (1971). The Tsar and family amid frequent bouts of snow.

One Day in the Life of Ivan Denisovich (1971). The gulag.

Strategic Air Command (1955), with James Stewart and a plane-crash scene in snowy Greenland.

On the Beach (1959) has a scene off ice-bound Point Barrow.

Red Snow (1952) with Guy Madison and Ray Mala. Communist Eskimos and secret weapons in the Arctic. Honest.

Igloo (1932) and Eskimo (1933), both also with Ray Mala in the Arctic.

Hit the Ice (1943) and Lost in Alaska (1952). Abbott and Costello at Sun Valley and, well, Alaska.

Road to Utopia (1945), Bing, Bob and Dottie in Alaska.

Sun Valley Serenade (1941).

Island in the Sky (1953), John Wayne and his downed crew stranded in Newfoundland.

The Fatal Glass of Beer (1933), with W.C. Fields, and it ain't a fit night out for man or beast.

The Spirit of St. Louis (1957). Lucky Lindy flies past an iceberg.

She (1935), with Randolph Scott and Helen Gahagan, this one set in an ice palace in Siberia.

Ice Palace (1960). Richard Burton and Robert Ryan battle for salmon and the soul of Alaska.

The Far Country (1954), James Stewart bringing cattle to the Yukon.

The Secret of Convict Lake (1951). Escaped convicts at a snowbound mountain village.

Fixed Bayonets! (1951), snowbound soldiers in Korea.

The Battle of Stalingrad (1949). Stalingrad says it all.

A Christmas Carol (1938) and Scrooge (1935 and 1951) plus all their variations.

The Moon is Down (1943), the Nazi occupation of Norway.

Re: Favourite SNOW (and ice) in classic films

A good list.

Since you mention 'Fixed Bayonets' (1951), let me add Retreat, Hell! (1952), an all-time favourite of mine ('Fixed Bayonets' too). White and red: snow and blood, though it's a black-and-white film. I looked for the video for years. Happily they have it now on YouTube. Besides, I have always been very interested in the Battle of Chosin Reservoir and what came later (NOT a retreat, of course!!). I bet Xenophon himself would have loved that EPIC, which took place twenty-three centuries later.

NB. I typed the title in red to 'illustrate' the Red Chinese attacking and the blood of the US Marines.

I'll bring the Chinese bugles another day...



More SNOW (and ice)

Alive (1993)

Based on a true story.


Also based on another true story

http://www.imdb.com/search/text?realm=title&field=plot&q=donner+party

some are documentaries and some are just "grab the story and run with it."



This American Experience documentary was particularly good The Donner Party (1992)

Re: More SNOW (and ice)

'Alive', yes, I saw it and I know the true story. Tremendous!

Haven't seen 'The Donner Party'. Looks interesting, I'll look for it.


Re: Favourite SNOW (and ice) in classic films

Hammer's ABOMINABLE SNOWMAN OF THE HIMALAYAS is a true SNOW AND ICE presentation. It builds into an intense and atmospheric thriller, unlike so many of the 'usual' monster movies. It's much more than that.

And you can really feel it's coldness and indifference.

Peter Cushing and Forrest Tucker turn in outstanding performances, which highlights their moral conflicts. More intelligent than what you might initially think.

Ending is enigmatic.

Re: Favourite SNOW (and ice) in classic films

I agree with you.

A part of this film was filmed in the French Pyrénées. The director of photography was Hammer's Arthur Grant, one of the best.

Pity it was shot in Hammerscope, but not in colour, though black-and-white has its advantages too, especially in Hammer films.

Val Guest already had the experience of his two Dr. Quatermass.

Cushing/Tucker: a rare combination.


Re: Favourite SNOW (and ice) in classic films

The two Quatermass films (QUATERMASS EXPERIMENT & QUATERMASS 2) were true classics that hold up well today. There's been much talk about remaking them. Leaves me with mixed feelings. Needs the right director who has seen them, and could do full justice to them. Fear they would go CGI crazy.

Val Guest did some amazing things with low budgets that didn't look cheap.

ABOMINABLE SNOWMAN had that Twilight Zone vibe that made it thought-provoking at the end, leaving it enigmatic. What did he really mean when he said "There is no Yeti." And Cushing and Tucker were that rare combo. Different acting styles that enhanced their tense conflict.

Really left me tripping on that. The B&W gave it that stark noirish quality. The perfect '2:00 AM Movie'.

Nigel Kneale and Val Guest made the ideal writer/director team. Kneale hated Donlevy's performance as Quatermass, but I actually liked his gritty approach, which added to the stark and bleak realism.

In some ways, Val Guest was the British Don Siegle in the 50's.


Re: Favourite SNOW (and ice) in classic films

Yes indeed, true classics. As for remakes in general, I couldn't be more sceptical.

And he was born in Maida Vale! He directed a few pretty mediocre movies, but besides those already mentioned I especially like his 'The Men of Sherwood Forest' (this one in Eastmancolor !!), 'Yesterday's Enemy' and 'Where the Spies Are', with Nigel Davenport (a favourite actor of mine) as
Parkington. Also 'The Day the Earth Caught Fire' (his screenplay was awarded a BAFTA). (*)


The perfect '2:00 AM Movie'.


Yeah. I own (DVD, video) some of those, plus TV surprises and YouTube ones. Sometimes I even watch one at 3 or 4 AM!!

Well, they were the same age and, though Siegel was born in Chicago, he was educated in England (Cambridge University).

(*) A few days ago I saw a Canadian TV movie: Earth's Final Hours (2011)



Re: Favourite SNOW (and ice) in classic films

Has anyone here seen Frank Capra's Dirigible (1931)? I can't list it as a favorite, since it's been on my list-to-see for a couple of years and I still haven't gotten around to it.

And Aloysius, you may want to see the short film To Build a Fire (1969), a dramatization of the Jack London short story. It's basically a man, his dog, and LOTS of snow, narrated by Orson Welles. Neither the story nor the film is one of my favorites, for sure, but plenty of snow.

Re: Favourite SNOW (and ice) in classic films

I haven't!! I didn't even know it (unfortunately, but I'm going to look for it, for it looks pretty interesting).

Same thing for 'To Build a Fire'.

------

PS. I just found it! (To Build a Fire):

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=RBB06RLmCcU

I'll watch it later on or tomorrow.

Thanks, eolloe.


Re: Favourite SNOW (and ice) in classic films

I just watched 'To Build a Fire'. It's great! Besides, I have always been interested in Jack London, in his personality and his life, though I haven't read many of his books, really.


🔺


Re: Favourite SNOW (and ice) in classic films

I recall some mesmerizing snow scenes in Kurosawa's Yume (1990) (Dreams).



California Ãœber Alles

Re: Favourite SNOW (and ice) in classic films

Re: Favourite SNOW (and ice) in classic films

Dirigible, Lost Horizon, Meet John Doe, It's a Wonderful Life -- that guy Capra sure did have snow on the brain!

Take 'em to Missouri

Re: Favourite SNOW (and ice) in classic films

And 'The Battle of Russia' (uncredited, but Capra's). With its famous generals:

General Winter...

General Snow...

General Frost...

.... and last but not least, General (later Marshal) Georgy Konstantinovich Zhukov...



Re: Favourite SNOW (and ice) in classic films

The end of It's A Wonderful Life
Near the end of Amarcord
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