Macbeth : question about the dialogue

question about the dialogue

Having read both the tempest and merchant of Venice (as well as chaucer, which is probably relevant too) I am familiar enough with Shakespearean dialogue, so its not particularly off putting for me, but I was just wondering is the dialogue in this IN Elizabethan English or is it modern english?

Thanks

Re: question about the dialogue

Elizabethan english. It's done quite well, but won't be for everyone.

Re: question about the dialogue

English isn't my first language and the Scottish accents made it even harder for me to understand.

Re: question about the dialogue

I'm Scottish and had a hard time with the dialogue, too much mumbling!

Re: question about the dialogue

Spot on! Modern actors try to speed up their articulation of overloaded with elaborate wordy phraseology Shakespearean text in order to be able to deliver the portrayal in a manner communicating with modern viewers. As a result, in many instances, they simply spit the words at such speed that it impedes any possible comprehension. Unless viewers are well familiar with the text, watching modern S. interpretation is a true torture. In order to be able to enjoy modern actors' interpretation, you literally have to know the play by heart.

Re: question about the dialogue

Whatever it was it was dreadful. I soon left after about 25mins

Post deleted

This message has been deleted.

Re: question about the dialogue

Shakespearean dialogue is modern English. Chaucer is Middle English.

Re: question about the dialogue


Shakespearean dialogue is modern English. Chaucer is Middle English.


It's only modern in classification. It bears only minor resemblance to how we speak English today. There's stark difference between the two.

Television is a vice; film is an addiction.

Re: question about the dialogue

People didn't speak like that in Shakespeare's day either.

Re: question about the dialogue

That's a great question!

When speaking about the evolution of the English language, it was Shakespeare himself who took it from 'Middle English' and advanced it to 'Early Modern English'. Obviously there was lots going on without him but in terms of sentence structure, arrangement of grammar, thought processes and general rhetoric, Shakespeare is credited as the most influential contributor of all time. For this reason, he himself is literally the milestone used to mark the change in stages from Middle to Early Modern. And just for the record, Shakespeare has ALWAYS been difficult to understand; Ben Johnson - a historically famous scholar of the day - found his language 'incomprehensible' and was an outspoken critic of his work. Shakespeare invented 2,700 new words at least 1,000 of which we still use today and many more countless expressions and phrases that have shaped the world we know (and hopefully love) today.

Re: question about the dialogue

Did you really think that's how people speak in England today?
Top