Audio Equipment and Home Theater Audio : Can I Lay My Subwoofer on Its Side?

Can I Lay My Subwoofer on Its Side?

Black Friday was good to me and I now have a new home theater system. The subwoofer has a very clear vertical axis, but for reasons of fitting it into a certain space, I'd like to lay it on its side. Will that affect the sound or lifespan? Also, even though it says it's shielded, how close to the TV is still safe?

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Re: Can I Lay My Subwoofer on Its Side?


Bass is non-directional.


Actually they're beta testing a two channel base. It's supposed to be like 22.2 or something...

Re: Can I Lay My Subwoofer on Its Side?

namoshndamud has gave u a good answer. but i never hear for any magnetic shield...
(bass reflex put in the corner- u will doubler the bass)
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James Woods-only one who reads the script before acting in it.

Re: Can I Lay My Subwoofer on Its Side?

Putting a bass reflex in the corner of a room to increase the bass is a good idea..... but it will insert an unwanted peak, spoiling the linearity of the frequency response, and will decrease the clarity due to multiple reflections.

Re: Can I Lay My Subwoofer on Its Side?

Putting a bass reflex in the corner of a room to increase the bass is a good idea..... but it will insert an unwanted peak, spoiling the linearity of the frequency response, and will decrease the clarity due to multiple reflections.

o common, there is no speakers anymore without bass reflex... room eats the sound.
and u must be smart how to aggrandize it. ears are to slow to get it.

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Re: Can I Lay My Subwoofer on Its Side?

Thanks for the info. I stick to what I said.

Re: Can I Lay My Subwoofer on Its Side?

Ideally a subwoofer should be kept upright on a rigid surface like a floor and its ports should face the width of the room. In special cases, you may lay your subwoofer on its side, just make sure the speaker diaphram (in case it is exposed) and the bass reflex port faces a free air space. To eliminate vibration noise, lay it on a thick cushion or rubber pad.

Expect some noise at very high intensities. The longevity of the speaker may get slightly affected if the structure is not designed to withstand its weight on its side... which of course depends on the model you are using.

Shielding is usually safe if you put it even next to the TV set, but if your Tv is not of the old CRT type, you need not be concerned at all.

Re: Can I Lay My Subwoofer on Its Side?

Bad idea, Especially if there is a passive radiator facing down. If so it is tuned for the small bit of air underneath, not a wide open space of air.

HUMPTY DUMPTY WAS PUSHED...www.PressForDumptyTruth.org

Re: Can I Lay My Subwoofer on Its Side?



But put your subwoofer on a glass surface, it did wonders for mine.

was that opposed to carpet?
It's funny because the hardwood floor people tell you to get a piece of carpet to put under it!
The thing to do is expierament.

As far as turning one on it's side, don't forget about heat dissapation from the amp too.
and you'd certainly need to isolate the side, new bottom, with some feet or spikes.


all of my movies are listed under "Must See" because YOU must.

Re: Can I Lay My Subwoofer on Its Side?

Lay it on its side? No.

The speaker's acoustic envelope was designed with a particular configuration in mind... You're doing two things wrong by setting it on its side (if it's not designed to be):

1. You're confounding the acoustic envelope... granted, very low frequencies are nondirectional but conductive reverberation (vibrating surface touching another vibrating surface) is not. Any part of the enclosure not designed to be rested upon may induce unwanted reverberations into your listening environment.

2. Manufacturing tolerances. Speakers are generally designed with a certain orientation in mind. Therefore, all the joints, screws, plates, etc. are all designed to meet stress tolerances in that configuration and not necessarily any other. Over time, a speaker laid on its side could weaken mounting screws of the driver, joints in the enclosure, panel surface shape, etc.

See this page for proper orientation of a surround system: http://www.dolby.com/consumer/home_entertainment/roomlayout.html

You will note many people like to put the subwoofer near or behind the couch. Sure, low frequencies are nondirectional... in open air. But solid objects obstructing them will in fact alter their acoustic reverberation and, depending on the material, absorb some of the strength of the soundwave.

Placing it between a front speaker and the center channel allows the sub to fire "into the circle" so to speak... where there's open air and no objects to significantly acoustically alter your perception of those sounds. Your ears are quite sensitive to any obstructions to an oscillating source. With the configuration given in Dolby Labs' recommendations, you're going to get the biggest bang for your buck.

I know people say some subs just aren't up to generating that much power, but I have a KEF PSW-2150 that's 10" and 250 watts, I have the input gain set to about 50% at the sub, and -11dB at the receiver's output gain, and it still rocks me out of my couch about 8 feet away.

Nature abhors a moron. -H.L. Mencken
http://www.cinemalogue.com
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