Audio Equipment and Home Theater Audio : Best in-ear earphones?

Best in-ear earphones?

I'm sure the people on this board must know a bit about heaphones and good quality ones. I just wanted to know what are a good pair of in-ear earphones to get? and are realitivly cheap? I'm looking at the Sennheiser CX300 and wondered what people in the know would thingk, any responses would be appreciated...

http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0490668//
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Re: Best in-ear earphones?

Hi Jeff, I have a pair of Sennheiser CX300's, simply the best in ear phones i have ever owned, superbly comfortable and IMO unsurpassed sound reproduction, another 2 people bought a pair after trying mine. If you are in the uk Amazon uk do them a lot cheaper than anywhere else. Hope this helps...

Re: Best in-ear earphones?

thanks euphoric, i have heard only good thongs about the CX300's (from friends and stuff) and i think i'll get... the ones that come with my iPod are to tinny and not loud enough for puplic transport. thanks v much...

http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0490668//
You know what to do...

Re: Best in-ear earphones?

By far


Shure SE530PTH

or the cheaper

Etymotic ER-4P

but neither are cheap, the 4p is about $200.00. (Hey the other is around $600.00)

Though after you hear the sound you will never go back and will be recording mp3's in near CD quality as you can hear the differnce plain as day.

Otherwise, and they are not ear buds but small portable folding headphones, the only thing that comes close is Koss Portapros at $40.00. I often us those at home.


Diablo5150-You said I'm illogical which proves that YOU are and IDIOT!!!

Re: Best in-ear earphones?

The Koss "The Plug" in-ear 'phones are great for the price. Just make sure you're getting a proper seal in your ear, or you'll think they don't have any bass. You might need to make replacement plugs out of foam earplugs or something. Not the best by any stretch, but a good choice if you tend to lose or break earphones or can't spend $100 or more.

Anyone who is playing earphones loud enough to burn them out should think about starting to save up for hearing aids... or invest in the Sony MDR-V900s which will handle several WATTS (not milliwatts) of power and go deaf even faster.

Re: Best in-ear earphones?

I like both the Shure and the Etymotics (I personally prefer the Ety's though that's probably because I've used them in a studio for so long I've got used to them and my lug 'oles are now Ety shaped rather than vice versa).

Its probably worth noting that these phones need to be well inserted and can be a little uncomfortable at first, but after a while you get used to them.

Also, if you need to take them off and on a lot I'd say get something else as they can be a bit of a hassle.

Re: Best in-ear earphones?

Shure and the Etymotics

I have ER-P4'S AND 530'S, it does not get much better than these two brands.

Trubl_Makr writes - Attention CBS: Bring back Walker, Texas Ranger! WTR is my favourite show

Re: Best in-ear earphones?

no such thing.
In ear headphones = hearing damage.
Even ipod whites.
Just turn the tv on low enough to barely understand, and then check it out again after 15 minutes of music.
It has something to do with the way sound travels down the ear canal & hits. It is supposed to reflect around a few times.

Re: Best in-ear earphones?

no such thing.
In ear headphones = hearing damage.


Where the heck did you read that. It volume related not placement related.

HUMPTY DUMPTY WAS PUSHED...www.PressForDumptyTruth.org

Re: Best in-ear earphones?


He has a point though... a sound source generates a lot more power at point blank range than 1 meter away. But also, in ear headphones create a bit of a vacuum that can increase pressure to the tympanum (eardrum) considerably rather than ambient sound in an open pressurized environment.



Nature abhors a moron. -H.L. Mencken
http://www.cinemalogue.com

Re: Best in-ear earphones?

I understand.

I'm not arguing that, just his absolute statement that they WILL cause hearing damage. Though the pressure certainly is a added factor and risk I can turn at least one of my Mp3 players too loud (Toshiba T400 and Shure 530's) and I can also turn my hometheater (Yamaha 2600, Mythos ST's in a 7.1 setup) too loud but unless there is a sudden shift in db's your ears will give you a ton of warning before damage result.

Point being there is a risk of hearing damage from any device that produces high db's, some may pose a bit more risk than others, but that's in the end users hands. They may cause but the WILL (or equal as in they will) cause is a misnomer (or half the country would be deaf)


GREAT to see a Dolby guy on board..........


Question: With a HD_DVD player running through my 2600 with HDMI transmitting Audio and video am I getting any improvement over DD 5.1 in bitrate, ect, using the 2600's processor. I can hear a differnce but so far comparing it (A-B) to the same DVD in both HD-DVD and standard DVD, I may just be hearing a line level difference.

Trubl_Makr - Attention CBS: Bring back Walker, Texas Ranger! WTR is my favourite show

Re: Best in-ear earphones?


Question: With a HD_DVD player running through my 2600 with HDMI transmitting Audio and video am I getting any improvement over DD 5.1 in bitrate, ect, using the 2600's processor. I can hear a differnce but so far comparing it (A-B) to the same DVD in both HD-DVD and standard DVD, I may just be hearing a line level difference.


No. The RXV-2600 does not support Dolby TrueHD decoding. If it's decoding the Dolby Digital AC-3 secondary track on the HD-DVD then the difference between that and the AC-3 track on a DVD is purely imaginary.

You would not be hearing a line level difference since both AC-3 tracks would be produced from the same AC-3 master file, assuming both the DVD and the HD-DVD are being played back through HDMI to the same receiver.

In fact, from what I'm reading, the Dolby TrueHD bitstream on HD-DVD appears to be a compressed variant.

The only exception I can think of is that I'm finding that HD-DVD players are capable of downmixing the audio if no TrueHD decoder is present in the receiver. An AC-3 downmix produced by an HD-DVD player isn't necessarily going to fare better than a pre-encoded AC-3 bistream. At most, it may just sound different... but I wouldn't say it's better. The downmixed AC-3 is still going to be restricted by the constraints of AC-3, namely that the bitstream should be 448Kbps for 5.1 channel audio, that it should retain dialog normalization and DRC metadata, a 20kHz lowpass filter on the mains, and a 120Hz lowpass filter on the LFE channel.



Nature abhors a moron. -H.L. Mencken
http://www.cinemalogue.com

Re: Best in-ear earphones?

No. The RXV-2600 does not support Dolby TrueHD decoding. If it's decoding the Dolby Digital AC-3 secondary track on the HD-DVD then the difference between that and the AC-3 track on a DVD is purely imaginary.

You would not be hearing a line level difference since both AC-3 tracks would be produced from the same AC-3 master file, assuming both the DVD and the HD-DVD are being played back through HDMI to the same receiver.


Thanks buddy, I knew it did not do TrueHD but was wondering if this Dolby Digital Plus made a difference with normal AC-3 decoding. (Or maybe it does not even apply)

I understand the line issue and should have been more specific.

DVD_HD HDMI with Audio pass through. Toshiba Player.

DVD Coaxial Digital Yamaha Player.

(So I could A-B the same part, not a great way to A-B I know but the HD_DVD holds only one disk so my with my flawed method at least I could switch back and forth to the same sound slice)

With the HD_DVD very long load time I don't even think I could come close to a A_B, my memory is not that long)

In fact, from what I'm reading, the Dolby TrueHD bitstream on HD-DVD appears to be a compressed variant.

Lossless?

Trubl_Makr - Attention CBS: Bring back Walker, Texas Ranger! WTR is my favourite show

Re: Best in-ear earphones?


Thanks buddy, I knew it did not do TrueHD but was wondering if this Dolby Digital Plus made a difference with normal AC-3 decoding. (Or maybe it does not even apply)


Dolby Digital Plus and Dolby TrueHD aren't the same thing. You didn't mention Dolby Digital Plus in your question. But the answer would still be no. But anyway, the quality of the output is heavily dependent on the quality of the master recording and the encoded AC-3.


I understand the line issue and should have been more specific.

DVD_HD HDMI with Audio pass through. Toshiba Player.

DVD Coaxial Digital Yamaha Player.

(So I could A-B the same part, not a great way to A-B I know but the HD_DVD holds only one disk so my with my flawed method at least I could switch back and forth to the same sound slice)

With the HD_DVD very long load time I don't even think I could come close to a A_B, my memory is not that long)


First things first... any type of DSP enhancement in the DVD players should be turned off. Check your settings menus, because sometimes there are default settings where some minor DSP enhancement is turned on.

Second, if the HD DVD player also plays standard DVD's I would attempt to compare them both through that player.

Here's the key... even though switching will take a while, this works to your benefit. The mind can bias you pretty quickly. When you hear samples back to back, and you're already expecting even in the slightest to find some difference, your mind will try to look for the most negligible and statistically insignificant variance... which is usually the worst way of assessing the difference.

On the other hand, if you listen to samples several minutes apart... you're now going to have to find a glaring difference in order for it to stick out in your mind against the prior sample.

Even better... if you have someone else running the test without telling you which sample is which, and without using the same segments of audio... If there really is a discernible difference you should be able to tell right away no matter what two segments are being compared.

Trust me on this... I've aided with the design of double-blind studies before and I find many flaws in most A-B and ABX comparisons offered on the internet, including hydrogenaudio.

Also, I know the metadata parameters pretty well... I could tell you if the AC-3 file used in the HD DVD was the exact same AC-3 file used in the DVD...if I could strip out the original AC-3 with metadata in tact... or if I had a Dolby DP-564 multichannel reference decoder to feed the output audio through.


Lossless?


I'm not sure. I have access to but I haven't yet read the technical documents on Dolby TrueHD from their repository but I'll see if I can't dig up more.

That said, if the quantization interval sample size is less than 24 bits, I would not expect you to be able to tell the difference between Dolby TrueHD and Dolby Digital AC-3.

I just found some references to the fact that Dolby TrueHD on the HD-DVD format is either compressed, or encoded at less than the maximum bit depth. This makes sense given the limitation of the HD-DVD format size relative to BluRay.

But can you clarify whether you know if the HD DVD you're comparing HAS an AC-3 track, or is it Dolby TrueHD? In fact, what movie title are you using for the comparison? I'd like to look up the specs.

Nature abhors a moron. -H.L. Mencken
http://www.cinemalogue.com

Re: Best in-ear earphones?

Don't really need to do a A-B anymore as you clearly know what you are taling about but hey you hit it right here..............

First things first... any type of DSP enhancement in the DVD players should be turned off. Check your settings menus, because sometimes there are default settings where some minor DSP enhancement is turned on.

I tried to do a net update on it a few days after I got it a few weeks ago, there is a cat5 port on the back, It locked up so I did the net update by a iso CD from the computer instead of a direct connection.


Well buddy, taking it from V 1.1 to V 1.3 RESET the dynamic range to Auto, no wonder it sounded flat to me, It was essentially in AC3-Night mode. As soon as i saw it I knew that was it.


Damn, Sorry to waste your time, if this format was not so new to me I bet I would have thought of the update setting things back to factory default (At least I like to think that I would have.)


Trubl_Makr - Attention CBS: Bring back Walker, Texas Ranger! WTR is my favourite show

Re: Best in-ear earphones?

DRC should always be set to "Standard". There are DSP profiles, such as Sony's Digital Reality Creation or DSP Cinema that enhance the phase characteristics to simulate the perceived output in certain acoustic halls but these have nothing to do with the Dolby Digital Dynamic Range Control setting.

I suspect that Auto is not equivalent to Standard if everything sounds flat... unless you've been using some enhanced mode the whole time that causes a compression envelope that produces results different from what the engineer intended you to hear.

Setting DRC to STANDARD ensures that the compression applied by the receiver is along the curve that the mastering engineer mixed to so that the resulting output is what the engineer intended for you to hear. I can understand that if you have speakers not capable of producing full range output at L,C,R,SurL and SurR... but otherwise Standard DRC should produce a pretty dynamic mix. The Dynamic range of AC-3 is 103-105dB, so if Standard is not dynamic enough then either there's something wrong with your speakers or the particular surround mix you're listening to. A really excellent way to test your system is to get one of those calibration DVD's with the Dolby Digital theatrical trailers on them. The soundtrack of these short sequences runs the gamut of dynamic range, channel crossfades, etc. to give you a good overall assessment of whether your calibration is on the mark.

Most of the other parameters, like Dialnorm, RF Intermodulation filtering, LFE lowpass, etc. cannot be modified. I love these features of Dolby Digital because a properly mastered mix will produce stunning results in the home and you never find yourself struggling to hear the dialogue no matter how loud the sound effects are.

The only other thing I'd suggest is make sure that your bass management is configured properly. If you have full range speakers for your surround channels, don't set them to "small" because this applies a lowpass filter on the surrounds and redirects low frequencies to the LFE channel. This feature is mainly intended if your surrounds are small enough that they cannot produce frequencies below 120Hz without being overdriven to distortion. But if you have speakers that are capable of 90dB down below 120Hz, using the "small" speaker setting really screws up the mix in my opinion. Granted, frequencies approaching 60Hz and lower lack phase characteristics, but the LFE channel on Dolby Digital has a lowpass at 120Hz so the higher harmonics would be interfered if you're redirecting sound from other speakers to be coupled with the LFE output to the subwoofer.


Nature abhors a moron. -H.L. Mencken
http://www.cinemalogue.com
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