Once Were Warriors : Do non-Maori watch this film to feel better about themselves?

Do non-Maori watch this film to feel better about themselves?

I'm of Samoan descent, and I've found that a lot of my cousins and a lot of my white friends who watch this film get a good laugh out of it. Is this a common behaviour among non-Maori?

"Don't cry, it is to be. In time, I'll take away your miseries and make 'em mine...D'Evils."

Re: Do non-Maori watch this film to feel better about themselves?

Not sure, not in my experience. My wife and I are both American Indian, and we watch it and find it quite...realistic to Rez/Indian life, especially the role of Jake/Rena Owen, how alcohol and bad decisions can tear apart a family. The differing levels of thought in this movie are very similar to American Indian life.

I don't find this movie very funny, it has always been sad, and very emotional for me, but it shows a good reflection of how life can work out.

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Re: Do non-Maori watch this film to feel better about themselves?

I don't see how I could get a good laugh out of this movie, I would think your cousins and friends are in a minority of people finding this movie funny.

Re: Do non-Maori watch this film to feel better about themselves?

I agree, I'm of Hawaiian/Caucasian descent and I saw the film for the first time about 15 years ago and was moved emotionally by this story which according to the director happens a lot in the Maori culture as it does in the other Polynesian cultures. It's sad and needs to end.

Re: Do non-Maori watch this film to feel better about themselves?

I know of people having a laugh at this film. It's not to make them feel better, and it's not just those who are not Maori. When I was at high school this would occasionally be shown and people would watch it, enjoy it for what it is, but would love some of the lines Jake the Muss would say, and would repeat them with laughter and all that sort of stuff, wasn't just the white kids, it was everyone. I personally don't find it a funny movie, but I think it's just that Jake the Muss is so iconic here in New Zealand that there is quite a lot of famous lines in this film.

Re: Do non-Maori watch this film to feel better about themselves?

Do you think its really a "good laugh" and not some other kind of nervous expression? because if its not disturbing, then what is? You should ask them what they find funny in the movie.

Maori's dont own dysfunctional families or violent spousal abuse. These are dramas that transcend all races.


"Death, has a tendency to encourage a depressing view of war." Donald Rumsfeld

Re: Do non-Maori watch this film to feel better about themselves?

Not in the slightest. I don't find it the least bit funny.

Perhaps they couldn't comprehend the violence, and starkness of it so in turn made light of it and laughed.

Re: Do non-Maori watch this film to feel better about themselves?

i agree with colt89 here. it's definitely not a funny movie but jake the muss has become a bit of an icon here, it's definitely his lines. the guys in my flat tell me to cook them some *beep* eggs all the time to which i would reply cook your own *beep* eggs. all in good nature, they're not about to heinously attack me.

it's also one of the rules of a popular drinking game here called circle of death, or vessel. the jake the muss rule, but it's too much to elaborate here haha

Re: Do non-Maori watch this film to feel better about themselves?

Recently watched this film in a film-class in university and there were times when everyone was laughing and I couldn't understand it. I'm white but there weren't any real points that I laughed in the film but many around me did and I found they did so at inappropriate times.

Re: Do non-Maori watch this film to feel better about themselves?

Absolutely not. I have enough experiences of a certain type in my past to have found this movie very disturbing and nearly unwatchable (despite thinking it was also very good and accurate in how it treated the subject) because it just dredged up too much negative nostalgia.

Then again, if some of my ancestors had made certain decisions differently, I might have grown up on a reservation or reserve, too. I have little doubt some of their stories weren't terribly different from this film, just from an earlier time and another continent (still haven't been able to bring myself to watch Rabbit-Proof Fence).

Maybe I'm just not quite "white" enough to find the subject matter amusing. And I really can't imagine why anyone would find anything to emulate in Jake Heke. That shows a *major* disconnect with the story.

Anyhoo, this wasn't what I came to this board for, so....


Innsmouth Free Press http://www.innsmouthfreepress.com

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Re: Do non-Maori watch this film to feel better about themselves?

Sounds like its just your friends. Maybe they're cowards laughing at a man beating a woman.
Or to cowardly to do that to a real Maori.

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Re: Do non-Maori watch this film to feel better about themselves?

Ha, do yourself a favour. If you get enough credits to get into university, DON'T enroll in Anthropology. In your case, ignorance is bliss, kid.

"Don't cry, it is to be; in time I'll take away your miseries and make 'em mine... D'Evils."

Re: Do non-Maori watch this film to feel better about themselves?

....

1.5 billion Chinese.
1 Billion Africans.
Almost 1 billion Indians.

Sounds like White people are Minorities to me.

Re: Do non-Maori watch this film to feel better about themselves?

I live in america shyt dyck, if I was any of those places I would be a minority. Like I said I am going to enjoy my status as the majority while it lasts. I am going to hold anyone of color down as long as possible and hopefully I will be dead before I become a minority. So do my laundry, mow my lawn and bang all the the fat white women nobody else wants.

Re: Do non-Maori watch this film to feel better about themselves?

I wasn't talking about nationality i was talking about race dumbass.

Over 1.5billion chinese IN THE WORLD.
Over 1 billion AFRICANS, Not Afrikaans, AFRICAN Descent IN THE WORLD.
Nearly 1 billion Indians IN THE WORLD. THE WHOLE WORLD. NOT JUST INDIA.

Dumbass.

Re: Do non-Maori watch this film to feel better about themselves?

Yeah I will explain again. I live in American, not only that I live in a part of America that I have to really want to see a brown person to see one. In my lifetime I will enjoy every advantage I have in being a white person. I understand the darkies are taking over the world by pure numbers. As I said before, in my lifetime the white man is and will continue to be the dominant race. So suck on that bitch.

Re: Do non-Maori watch this film to feel better about themselves?

And you also live on EARTH Where the "White Devil" only accounts for less than 800,000,000 compared to the others who account for more than a billion.

Asia alone has close to 3 billion people.

Re: Do non-Maori watch this film to feel better about themselves?

Isnt funny how only 800,000,000 can run the whole world while the rest are still living in mud huts and wiping there ass with there hand still.

Re: Do non-Maori watch this film to feel better about themselves?

If you are an example of the white race, then I am ashamed to say I am a white woman. It's people like you that give us a bad reputation. Your out and out ignorance and marginalization of others is reprehensible. Oh yeah, in case your too ignorant to understand my big words, those were insults. You disgust me!

Re: Do non-Maori watch this film to feel better about themselves?

Its okay libby.
bigtopne is a white American. He is likely to be unintelligent, uninformed and not realise that the rest of the world exists. Funnily enough what they have not yet accepted is that their "superior" ways have resulted in their country now being bankrupt. They are owned by the Chinese. If it was in their interest China could turn America into a wasteland overnight.
If bigtopne lives for another 40 years or so he will live to see himself become a functional minority. Americans are living on borrowed time and the clock has stopped ticking, time is up.
Strangely enough bigtopne doesn't realise that their trailer park trash are as bad as any dis-functional non-white community.

Re: Do non-Maori watch this film to feel better about themselves?

jackblythe, I take my hat off to you, kind sir.

Re: Do non-Maori watch this film to feel better about themselves?

I'm from Poland and i had only two laughs during the movie. Both were when Beth opened her beer with her kitchen gear.

Re: Do non-Maori watch this film to feel better about themselves?

I am Danish, and I've seen this film many times and own it on DVD.

I find it deeply moving, at points uncomfortable, and with violence that is realistic, unpleasant and disturbing. I don't find it funny in the least!

Re: Do non-Maori watch this film to feel better about themselves?

I remember being stunned by this film back in 1994. It's not as if the US doesn't have it's share of extreme dpmestic vioence, it does, and I've seen it first hand. But the backdrop of Once Were Warriors, the lives of a group of contemporary Maoris was something I got a look at for the first time. The performances were hair raising to say the least.

Re: Do non-Maori watch this film to feel better about themselves?

This movie, and some of the lines particularly Jakes, are so ingrained in New Zealander's that we can laugh about some of them. It's got nothing to do with whether you are white or Maori or Samoan or Tongan or whatever. Jakes "too much weights, not enough speed work" is a classic line that most Kiwi's will recognize, along with Jake's "this is the life aye kids, don't even have to change gears" and yes indeed even some more serious lines are regularly said jokingly. But that doesn't mean people find the movie funny, rather we've just seen the movie so many times that we can extract some of the lines from the context of the film and then have a laugh about them.

Re: Do non-Maori watch this film to feel better about themselves?

Well your friends sound like *beep* if they think its funny. My family is Irish stock (Ma and Pa born here, Grandparents over there) and early family life was pretty much an exact mirror of the film. Dad was an alcoholic gangster. Smooth and charming when he wanted to be or untill he got to much in him and then it was fights and beating up mom me. Probably would have killed us if moms never took off. So anyway no, as a white guy I don't find anything funny about this film. It's pretty sad when tribal people got *beep* over by the Xtian anglo-saxons the world over - - remember the Irish were tribal too, we had our own language and culture they took from us, so being "white" really doesn't have a lot to do with it. This just seems to be a common illness in tribal societies when we were forced in a very short time span to adopt to an alien way of life that was anathema and the anithesis of how we chose to live. It's why we still don't really fit into their world and it's better that we start to migrate back to ours. Like in the before time. The long, long ago. :)

Re: Do non-Maori watch this film to feel better about themselves?

I agree. This movie has stuck with me since I saw it back in 1994. Not funny at all! Probably the best of its kind!

Re: Do non-Maori watch this film to feel better about themselves?

People who laugh at this movie are not actually finding it funny. They are unable to confront the emotions that it elicits in them and use laughter to distance themselves from their discomfort. This is also likely to be from those who may suffer or who have suffered from similar circumstances.
The realism of the violence and the dis-functionality of the community and family unit are highly concerning. Apart from some intended humour there is nothing funny in this movie whatsoever.
The fact that you,your counsins and friends find this amusing suggests that you have likely been in circumstances of similar disfunction. For people who have been raised in a safe and loving environment this movie contains no humour but only a stark and horrifying portrayal of how wrong a community can be. I feel for you. You should try to confront the real emotions this movie has connected with and understand that life does not have to be like this.

Re: Do non-Maori watch this film to feel better about themselves?

I am of Ngai Tahu decendency but have inherited many of my physical features from my European father. I've watched this film several times with pakehas who don't know my ancestry and have never heard any of them laugh at this film, or express comments that would lead me to believe it makes them 'feel better about themselves'.

However, I have once walked into a conversation about this film and about domestic violence with an ex-boyfriend's mother who made a comment about it being 'a Maori problem'. I understand that this is a common point of view in some groups of pakeha New Zealanders and that statistically, Maori families are more likely to experience domestic violence than pakehas. My own family has sadly suffered at the hands of a family member.

However, statistics also record that Maori earn less, own fewer assets, have a higher rate of suicide, are less likely to persue higher learning, among many other disadvantages... these are all issues which make many members of the Maori community more vulnerable to socio-economic factors. New Zealand has also had a worsening gap between the rich and poor in recent years.

I believe it's a common problem where indigenous populations are colonised and therefore, a problem of all society in New Zealand. Domestic abuse is certainly not limited to Maori or Pacific Islanders. And neither is stereotypical thinking limited to pakehas.

This was an excellent, challenging film and groundbreaking for it's time.

Re: Do non-Maori watch this film to feel better about themselves?

parts of this film are funny, which some people may not have got, not all Maori have violence in their life yet most do have a great sense of humour, and this film was very well made, the humour was just a part of the culture dipicted in the movie

Re: Do non-Maori watch this film to feel better about themselves?

I honestly feel that this movie could've been made everywhere. Yes they were Maori but families like this exists everywhere and not just there. Its not a Maori issue I think. Domestic violence exists everywhere

The movie could've easily been made somewhere else. Like my country Sweden. There are people here who are just like the Kekes. Poor and outside the normal society who turn to violence and alcohol when thins get rough.
If you walk through Stockholm or any other larger town you find areas and neighbourhoods just like this one.

Films like this are needed as a wake up call for all. It should be viewed by all, especially in schools. It is a important issue that's not very talked about unfortunately. This movie could be used as a first step to talk about it.

Re: Do non-Maori watch this film to feel better about themselves?


I've found that a lot of my cousins and a lot of my white friends who watch this film get a good laugh out of it.


Sounds like textbook macho-defence-mechanism. Picture the scene; Bunch of lads scoopin' beers... they hire a movie with a death scene that would shatter the hardest of hearts, and you'll still get juvenile comments to cover-up the fact that they nearly blubbed in front of their mates.



KiBL : but we're talking about vision...how fast does it travel?

Re: Do non-Maori watch this film to feel better about themselves?

"They hire a movie with a death scene that would shatter the hardest of hearts, and you'll still get juvenile comments to cover-up the fact that they nearly blubbed in front of their mates."

This evoked such a vivid image in me. I KNOW I have seen this happen.

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Re: Do non-Maori watch this film to feel better about themselves?

I don't know why anyone would find this film amusing. Its one of the most brutal films I've ever seen.

Re: Do non-Maori watch this film to feel better about themselves?

Well im white and I didn't find it funny. Its a fantastic film but in no way is it funny, its very real and find it frightening that some people are going through such domestic violence, sexual violence and just the over all violence by Jake in general.

TEAM FINN!!

Re: Do non-Maori watch this film to feel better about themselves?

Absolutely not. I find it disturbing and beautiful. A very real drama. The actors are superb.

Re: Do non-Maori watch this film to feel better about themselves?

White american here. Caught th is film on tv one night and it mesmerized me. it was a brutal film to get through, yet, I bought the dvd to watch it further. I like the film on a whole, despite the violence and poor Grace's situation. I like to watch it because most of these people, especially the weak ones find their spirit and the hapless Grace is actually the saving grace for her family. she is their tanifar (is this the correct term?)

I see nothing to laugh at in this movie, I am a man in my fifties, and everytime i watch this it disturbs me but i am uplifted by Grace's funeral only because this is where Beth and her children find the strength and their spiritual being. I love how they show Beth walking off the screen when she leaves Jake in the parking lot. Out of his life forever.


Swing away, Merrill....Merrill, swing away...

Re: Do non-Maori watch this film to feel better about themselves?

I don't know anyone who watches this film for a laugh. If white people think that they are above this they really need a reality check. This story could have been about any ethnicity or race. Bad times happen to everyone and a lot of people deal with domestic violence and rape.

GOD whoever thinks this is funny is a freaking sociopath.

Re: Do non-Maori watch this film to feel better about themselves?

Grace getting raped and killing herself isn't at all funny, but there are many funny moments in this movie. Some genuinely like when Jake throws out the guy simulating his penis in front of the ladies or when he sees his son in the bar. Others become funny for their sheer over the top violence. Even when he beats is wife. It shouldn't be, but the way they act it makes it feel like a parody.

The *beep* in the beginning getting beat and uncle Bully at the end are more pleasurable than funny.

It's all part of the brilliance of the movie. Normally you should hate a guy who acts the way Jake does, and although you at times do you are still left feeling sorry for him. He's not so much a bad dude as he is a conflicted male trying to make it in a very tough, poor environment. Under all the drink and angers issues there is a good man.

Re: Do non-Maori watch this film to feel better about themselves?

Probably because of Temuera Morrison's performance. His acting is so strange and over the top it becomes funny. I also laughed several times when he was on screen, but for me it was because I kept seeing him as the dog guy from Island of Doctor Moreau. I'll always associate him with that performance.

Re: Do non-Maori watch this film to feel better about themselves?

Definitely not.

Whoever says so is merely trolling.
There's nothing to feel good about in this movie (other than not being in the same room as Jake - that's my personal one, though).

It's making a deliberate comment on our society. It's pointing out the flaws within our culture. But laughing at our own flaws, would be the biggest flaw of all.


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Re: Do non-Maori watch this film to feel better about themselves?

Here in Hawaii it's very popular amongst native Polynesians, who can relate to the effect American (British in the case of OWW) imperialism has had on their traditional societies. I don't know anyone who finds it funny, that sounds pathological to me.

Re: Do non-Maori watch this film to feel better about themselves?

Cook the man some *beep* eggs!

Keyboard Warrior Class: Barbarian

Re: Do non-Maori watch this film to feel better about themselves?

Not even close man, I'm Portuguese/Guyanese and the first time I saw this film I was nearly moved to tears. Especially during the funeral for Grace scene. I suppose I understand how some people can get a laugh out of this film, but believe me, I'm not one of them. This is a wonderful film with a ton of heart and depth.

__________
"Angels to some, demons to others..... Now you must come with us!"
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