I Need To Know : Singer in "Sleuth" (1972) [PROBABLY FOREVER AN UNSOLVED MYSTERY]

Singer in "Sleuth" (1972) [PROBABLY FOREVER AN UNSOLVED MYSTERY]

I'm sure somebody has posted about this before because it's seemingly such a big mystery (see http://www.soundtrackcollector.com/forum/displayquestion.php?topicid=7598, http://en.allexperts.com/q/Classic-Film-2786/Cole-Porter-Sleuth-movie.htm, and http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0069281/board/thread/10107549), so, if there is another thread about this, it would help me a great deal if someone can post a link to it.

The mystery is that just about no one seems to know who sang three Cole Porter songs--"Just One of Those Things," "You Do Something to Me," and "Anything Goes"--in the movie Sleuth (1972). Here's a link to a video of Laurence Olivier's character dancing to them in a scene from the movie: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4_VVr8ScGOc. One would think that by this time someone would have some idea of who sang them, but the identity of the singer just seems a mystery despite some promising leads over the years, none of which have panned out. Even more curiously, there is no singer identified in the end credits, and the three songs did not appear on the movie's soundtrack.


From what I could find, the last time that someone could look into this question was at the website "Soundtrack Collector" on March 5 of this year; the last poster stated that he had found "the exact song" of "Anything Goes" on Amazon Music for $1.29. After checking Amazon Music and looking through/previewing the many different versions of "Anything Goes," I was unable to find the song to which he referred and could not find the version from Sleuth. The poster immediately before him suggested that "You Do Something to Me" was on the soundtrack for Woody Allen's Magic in the Moonlight, but, after checking that, I discovered that that version was sung by Frank Luther for Leo Reisman's orchestra, a candidate considered since the beginning--and not the actual singer from Sleuth. The weird thing about the whole thing is that it seems so mysterious. Why should it be so difficult to find who sang three songs? Why wasn't the singer's name in the credits? Why didn't the soundtrack include the songs?


My only guess--and I concede that this is far-fetched--is that it's on purpose. The film is all about tricks, games, mysteries, puzzles, etc., and, unlikely as it sounds, I wonder if director Joseph Mankiewicz and screenwriter Anthony Shaffer made this mysterious singer so hard to find on purpose. That is to say, I wonder if the versions were specially created for the film or put together from other recordings (somehow)--or that it's someone whom we wouldn't suspect of being a singer (someone suggested Michael Caine himself, though I very much doubt it). More likely, of course, no one ever thought that anyone would be trying so hard to find this guy--but that still leaves the above questions unanswered. I apologize for going on so long, but I did want to provide all the background that I could. Thank you all very much--it would be great if someone could finally put this old question to rest!

Re: Singer in "Sleuth" (1972)

Some mystery. I found it easy.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=V42nPAv06ag

Re: Singer in "Sleuth" (1972)

WillEd--
I apologize if this sounds glib, but did you read the whole post? I know it's long, but I gave all that background for a reason. About halfway through, I wrote this line: "... I discovered that that version was sung by Leo Reisman, a candidate considered since the beginning--and not the actual singer from Sleuth." I have just now changed that because the song wasn't actually sung by Mr. Reisman--the accompaniment is his orchestra--but it's the same as your 1929 Leo Reisman version--and not the version in Sleuth. The singer in Sleuth has a softer, more melodious voice (sorry for all the lay terms. I'm not a musician), I think; and, just to prove it, Frank Luther (the singer in the Leo Reisman version) says "tah tah" (or some sound like it) after the line "Do do that voodoo that you do so well," which the singer in Sleuth does not say. Mr. Reisman's versions--and Luther's vocals in particular--have been considered before (see http://www.soundtrackcollector.com/forum/displayquestion.php?topicid=7598) , but they're not it. So, respectfully, I would have to say that this still is "some mystery."
Thank you for searching, though, and all the best!

Re: Singer in "Sleuth" (1972)

I don't care if he says "tah-tah" in one version and doesn't say it in another. That is the same arrangement and the same singer. I played them both together at the same time and the phrasing is the same. The differences you think are picking up in the tone of the voice is most likely from the from the quality of the record. There is no way the singing could be that close and not be the same singer.

Re: Singer in "Sleuth" (1972)

OK, in that case I suppose we shall have to agree to disagree. Believe me, I don't want to drag this mystery out longer than it needs to be, but I just really feel that isn't it--nor have other listeners, in fact, judging from the comments both on the Soundtrack Collector site and YouTube (look at the comments under the Olivier video)--so I'm not alone in believing that. Like you, I played them together; I certainly don't feel that they have the same singer and even less so the same arrangement. I get what you're saying about the quality of the record, but I'm still not seeing (or hearing!) it. As for your last point--I first got interested in figuring this thing out a few months ago when I listened to the songs again. I didn't think about it again for a while, but, both in looking up details for posting today and having listened to many versions of "You Do Something to Me," I can confidently state that there are many, many singers with very similar sounding voices. That does not mean, of course, that any one of them sang the songs in Sleuth. (Sure, one of them could have. For the reasons I've stated, however, I don't think Mr. Luther is the right one.) Whether you're right or I am, I would be interested in knowing why you so quickly jumped to Luther as the singer. Did you know his voice before? Have you looked up this question before? This might be another good resource: http://en.allexperts.com/q/Classic-Film-2786/Cole-Porter-Sleuth-movie.htm. Whichever one of us is right, though, thank you so much for looking into it!
I'd like to open this discussion up to everyone else who might be interested: do you think that Frank Luther is the singer in Sleuth? Are the YouTube commenters, the Soundtrack Collector commentators, and I right--or are we just hearing changes because of the quality of the record? Please comment! I'm interested in hearing everyone else's guesses!

Re: Singer in "Sleuth" (1972)

I don't think he is anymore. But he is awfully close and so is another singer I found. In any event, I think Luther does better on the song. Nice, smooth sound.

Re: Singer in "Sleuth" (1972)

Yes, he is awfully close, isn't he? And I like Luther's sound too, although--you're right--the record doesn't help. That's a big problem with these songs--so many voices that sound so similar! Oh, well, back to the old drawing board again...

Re: Singer in "Sleuth" (1972)

It has to be a recording from that year or not long after because later recordings like, say 1936, don't sing it like that. It sounds like the singers around then are copying the style of whoever first made the song famous.

Re: Singer in "Sleuth" (1972)

Good point.
The only other possibility I could see is my ridiculous theory that someone sang it exclusively for the movie--purposely imitating the late 20s/early 30s style of someone like Frank Luther. That would explain a lot of the problems we have finding it--but it seems like an awful lot of trouble for something so relatively minimal and doesn't seem very likely. I'm hoping that we can look more into the whole question; the subject was broached in 2006 at Soundtrack Collector, and nobody has been able to find it from then to now.

Re: Singer in "Sleuth" (1972)

The first song is from 1935. By then the style would have been outmoded in both the musical arrangement and the singing.

Re: Singer in "Sleuth" (1972)

Hm. Does that help us or just make it more complicated? Either way, smart detective work there!

Re: Singer in "Sleuth" (1972)

You got songs from 1929, 1934 (Anything Goes) and 1935. I haven't heard AG, but I assume it has the same orchestra and same singer. This makes me think the songs were done for the movie.

You didn't have albums in those days.

Re: Singer in "Sleuth" (1972)

Right. It is strange, though, if that's true, why they didn't put the name of the singer in the credits. I mean, even if the songs were created especially for the movie, someone had to sing them! It is nice to know that the evidence points to their being done for the movie, though.

Re: Singer in "Sleuth" (1972)

He is singing in that now defunct Mid Atlantic American accent where the r's are dropped on certain words. That was the accent that was easiest for British singers to copy when they wanted to sound American. It's no guarantee the singer is British. But on Anything Goes it is very obvious that's what he's doing. American singers of the era like Bing Crosby, Al Jolson, and Cliff Edwards didn't use it. But Rudy Valle and Fred Astaire (slightly) did.

Last thing

Something was bothering me about the "You do Something to Me" from SLEUTH. I couldn't put my finger on it, but it was off. It's this: On old records you get a long musical intro before the singer gets in it. Then they sing the whole song with no musical interruption, then you get the music of the song again. The fact the SLEUTH songs have short intros doesn't matter because they could be edited. But on that song, the only one where you hear the entire song, there's a music break before the final verse. That's unusual for that era. The Frank Luther version is sung all the way through with no breaks.

Re: Singer in "Sleuth" (1972)

I am very thankful to WillEd for all of his research in trying to figure out who sang the three Cole Porter songs in the movie Sleuth (1972). When he posted for the last time, he thought that someone sang the songs especially for the films, due in part to the fact that the singer has the Mid-Atlantic accent that many British and some American singers used in the '30s and that the "You Do Something to Me" from Sleuth has a musical break, whereas many versions from the era did not. I would have to say he's probably correct--if people have been trying for years to find this singer, and no one has, then it's less likely he's actually a '30s singer. That still raises the question of "Who sang it?" of course, but, if someone sang the songs just for the movie, it may be one of those unanswerable questions, unfortunately. A sincere thank you again, WillEd. Also, if anyone else has done any research or is interested again in this question, or has any other thoughts, please respond! I agree with WillEd, but, hey, nothing is positive in this business!
Anyone out there with any more answers?

Re: Singer in "Sleuth" (1972)

Interestingly enough, I just found--well, if not a lead, then at least something. A poster called "koyunbaba73" posted something a year ago that I happened by sheer chance to find on YouTube:
"Okay, so for those of you who were interested in learning who sings on these recordings, I haven't been able to find out for sure, however the voice reminded me quite a bit of the singer on Paper Moon. His name is (was?) Joe Cassidy. Like I said, I haven't been able to confirm this 100%, but it is a lead. If anyone can find out Whether it is in fact Joe Casssidy [sic], I would sure appreciate it if you could tell me. He did have a great voice."
I Googled Mr. Cassidy but was unable to find any information, even about his singing in Paper Moon. It's been a while since I've seen Paper Moon, so I can't say if the singer there sounded like the one in Sleuth to me. Anyway, is this another clue--or another red herring? Amusing how the quest for the singer reaches the levels of a game or a mystery--it'd make Andrew Wyke proud.
Thoughts?


P.S. Here's the link to Sleuth on Youtube where "koyunbaba73" wrote his comments: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=oNqXPV_bwL0

Re: Singer in "Sleuth" (1972)

Here is Joe Cassidy. Not even close.
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=MCN9KIPfMPE
And notice it is done the way I said, no musical beak before the third verse, which became the norm sometime in the forties.

I'm pretty sure you have to be looking for a singer who did it for the movie. They wanted someone to sing three Cole Porter songs in a row and they would have had a hard time finding someone who did that from that era with the same orchestra with the first song from 1929 and the other two from the mid thirties. And they wouldn't have wanted the long musical interludes from that era. They had to get the visuals from the movie to fit the pacing of the song.

Cassidy is also hitting his R's hard. He does have a peculiar pronunciation for "laughter." He says "lofter." That's a British way of pronouncing it, but he still hits the "R" at the end.

Re: Singer in "Sleuth" (1972)

I did find an old record sung the forties way. But the singer, Johnny Marvin, is clearly not the SLEUTH singer.

Oops! The link didn't catch. But what does it matter? This guy definitely does not have a mid Atlantic accent. I linked it so you could hear the way the song was done with short intros and the break before the third verse is repeated.

Re: Singer in "Sleuth" (1972)

To clarify, the reason this matters it is a 1920's or early thirties record. But it seems kind of rare. He might be playing with a studio orchestra instead of a band and that might have something to do with it.

Re: Singer in "Sleuth" (1972)

I still hear the mid Atlantic accent anytime famous later character actress Holland Taylor talks, whether it's in Legally Blonde or anything..Elizabeth Banks,espo.in "Hunger Games" as ":Effie" uses that mid-Atalantic accent..MusicProf78 on YouTube as someone said, has a lot of answers..the long intro is something that I'm most familiar with..

PROFILE PIC:Courtney Thorne-Smith.

Re: Singer in "Sleuth" (1972)

Paragraph's for god's sake. It's really really hard & annoying to read that wall of text.

Re: Singer in "Sleuth" (1972)

To "Gandolph_Lundgren":
As per your request, I separated the initial comment into several paragraphs. That help?
Best,
salzmank

Re: Singer in "Sleuth" (1972)

Bing Crosby recording of Stardust in 1931 and 1939 has short music intros before he starts singing. Louie Armstrong the same year has the long intro. Crosby in 1931 sings it through and vamps a little at the end, but doesn't repeat the third verse. The 1939 version is done the standard way. The 1939 was put on record, but came directly from his radio show. Radio might have helped standardize the way songs were done. You don't want to wait a long time for the singer to sing listening to a radio show. Also, the attitude might have been that the real star was the band and not the singer. Most of these singers, unlike Cosby, were not big names. Cosby's voice got a lot lower by 1939.

Re: Singer in "Sleuth" (1972)

Just checking in again--
Nothing new, I suppose? I mean, even if someone sang the Porter songs specially for the movie, which is the conclusion WillEd and I ended up reaching, it was still someone, some singer. Just making sure there's still no progress made on this front. Everyone agree with me that this is quite a mystery for something so relatively minute and unimportant? Funny how these things work out.
--salzmank

Re: Singer in "Sleuth" (1972)

All I have to say is it is kind of funny nobody noticed the singer wasn't credited until you came along. It's a famous movie.

Re: Singer in "Sleuth" (1972)

I can't take credit for it, though. I watched the movie years ago (after reading the play--still have yet to see the play performed), liked it a lot, and (in the back of my mind) thought the songs were well sung. One day, I saw a link to the YouTube video with Oliver dancing to the songs, and that's where all the comments (e.g., "Who was the singer?") were. Then I started Googling it, and I saw just how long people have been looking for the guy. Some commentators said that the questioner could post the question to IMDb "I Need to Know" forum, but I couldn't find any one who had done so--and I took the initiative (and thereby fell down this particular rabbit hole). But those commentators long ago realized that the singer wasn't credited. Someone could always put this on a list of famous unsolved mysteries...

Hey, at least I didn't ask about a movie with William Shatner in which a plane crashed in a desert and everyone on it was a ghost... ;)

Re: Singer in "Sleuth" (1972)

Or the guy who insisted he saw a movie where Shatner drowned a woman in a pool.

Re: Singer in "Sleuth" (1972) [STILL UNSOLVED]

Why not write to Prof78, the yt poster who uploaded the Frank Luther/Leo Reisman track for which WillEd provided a link? Prof78 seems to know a lot of music from that era and might be able to ID the singer in your Sleuth CP tracks.

https://www.youtube.com/channel/UClXaWRq-cycKeWo1kDQigzw

If Prof78 doesn't know, perhaps ask a few others on yt who have extensive collections of music from that era. Good luck.

"All you need to start an asylum is an empty room and the right kind of people."

Re: Singer in "Sleuth" (1972) [STILL UNSOLVED]

Hi Helena--
Thank you for your comment. You know, I may do just that--write to Prof78. However, WillEd and I both came to the conclusion that the singer did them specially for the movie (vide WillEd's posts from May 9, May 10, and June 18, and mine from May 9 and June 17). Of course, we may be totally wrong, though WillEd has done a good deal of musicological detective work in those last few posts that make him doubtful that the singer actually sang them in the '30s. Even so, I may write to Prof78 anyway, just to ask him to make sure he can't find any such singer. Thank you again for the help! I hope we're able to figure this thing out sometime!
Best,
salzmank

Re: Singer in "Sleuth" (1972) [STILL UNSOLVED]

OK, here we go:
I reached out to "MusicProf78," as you suggested, and here's what he had to say:

"Interesting! I'm not well-schooled on British vocalists (which this must have been), but these arrangements--though somewhat 'traditional' in nature--don't sound much at all like actual vintage recordings from the early & mid-1930s period of the songs' initial popularity. And I agree that they may have been recorded specifically for the "Sleuth" soundtrack, however the voice doesn't ring a bell. ..."

So it is almost undeniable now that the songs were done for the movie. The question is, of course, the same one from the beginning--who the heck sings 'em?

Again, thanks for your help, Helena.

Re: Singer in "Sleuth" (1972) [UNSOLVED MYSTERY]

bump

Re: Singer in "Sleuth" (1972) [UNSOLVED MYSTERY]

bump

Re: Singer in "Sleuth" (1972) [UNSOLVED MYSTERY]

another good mystery ...

Re: Singer in "Sleuth" (1972) [UNSOLVED MYSTERY]

Oh, yeah, this is a big one--one of those great unsolved mysteries of the movies--but, as much as I don't want to do it, I think I'll have to give up on it. WillEd and I went on for a while about it. He initially thought that Frank Luther sang them before we eventually decided that they were sung specially for the movie--which hypothesis was confirmed by "MusicProf78." As to who sang them, though...
Your guess is as good as mine.

Re: Singer in "Sleuth" (1972) [UNSOLVED MYSTERY]

Might also ask on the Classics Board ... some of the folks there know the most seemingly trivial of trivia !


Edit : read more of the notes and I kinda like the Michael Caine idea .
It would fit in with the whole fool-em-whenever-you-can idea of the film.

Re: Singer in "Sleuth" (1972) [UNSOLVED MYSTERY]

Hm! I'm ashamed to say that, even after all my searching about this movie, I still hadn't seen this before you pointed it out!
I will try to reach out to them; why not?
As hopeful as I am that the Classics Board, or anyone, knows the solution (i.e., who sang the songs), I've got to admit I'm skeptical after so many people over so many years (see all the links I posted in the [very] original post) have been searching for the answer.
Anyhoo, thanks for finding this.

Re: Singer in "Sleuth" (1972) [UNSOLVED MYSTERY]

Unfortunately, I just checked a sample of the "Anything Goes" on the two albums that that one poster suggested, and it's not it. Gee, I would like it to be the Michael Caine idea, but (1) I've never heard Caine sing and (2) the singer certainly doesn't have that famed Cockney accent of Caine's. Sure, he could have disguised his voice, but I don't know if he could have done it so much--it certainly sounds less like him than (SPOILER) the impression he does of a Welshman when he impersonates "Inspector Doppler," and that's definitely trying to fool you. It would fit with the theme, absolutely.

On the other hand, this shouldn't be such a difficult question--so, as unlikely as it sounds, I'm leaning towards the idea that the filmmakers hid the identity on purpose. Why didn't they name the singer in the credits? It seems to break every darn copyright law in the business--especially if it's a then-contemporary singer, not a '30s or '40s singer whose renditions might have gone into public domain. Lord! I wish we could solve this mystery. I like the singer's voice, but I'm not crazy about it; I'd just like to answer these unanswerable questions once and for all. Maybe it's the human desire for mystery. Oh, well, no need to wax philosophical about it...

Re: Singer in "Sleuth" (1972) [STILL AN UNSOLVED MYSTERY]

Sorry I don't have time to devote to this right now, but in the past I have solved a couple of these by figuring out who paid to license the song, and then looking for the associated licensing info. It sounds like this was recorded for the film, so that's a starting point on year.

You might also send Ben Mankiewicz a tweet with a link to your post. He probably loves the movie and an answer may lie in family archives.

Re: Singer in "Sleuth" (1972) [STILL AN UNSOLVED MYSTERY]

Gee, the Ben Mankiewicz idea is great. I don't know if he'll respond, but, hey, who knows? Thanks for that.

No worries about your not researching this question! It's certainly not the most important problem in the world, or even close--just one of those silly little mysteries. I will take up your suggestions.

All the best!

[Sorry, But STILL AN UNSOLVED MYSTERY]

Ok then. I have checked with my two resident friend "knowers of details" and BOTH of them are answerless on this one. One echoes the suggestion that it's a "faux vintage" singer and since this is of the time before those endless credits for even the stars dog-walker, we may never know.

My other expert had seen the thread but having nothing to add had passed it by but he has a suggestion about the phones ... on the other thread.

As for me ... I really like the in-joke idea of it being Michael Caine ... singers often become non-accented ! No doubt it isn't him but I just like the idea !

Thanks for this interesting thread. It's been fun.



Re: [Sorry, But STILL AN UNSOLVED MYSTERY]

Oh, sure, you're welcome. The very fact that it shouldn't be such a big mystery is what got me interested in it to begin with.

Thanks for asking your two friends! Yes, I agree that we may never know, but it does seem strange that they would hire a singer to sing the songs specially for the movie, have a "music by" credit, even (for Pete's sake!) have credits for "sound recordist" and "music arranger," and still not credit this guy. Perhaps I'm just seeing too much into it.

It's a nice idea, that the singer is Michael Caine, but, yeah, I don't think so. I wonder if the singer is still alive and knows that so many people are interested in his identity. Y'know, someone could come up with a clever plot idea for a book based on this mystery.

I'll look in the other thread for your friend's thoughts about "the phone don't phone!"

And a sincere thank you for your help, Byrdz. It has been fun.

Re: [Sorry, But STILL AN UNSOLVED MYSTERY]

I posted the question on the Michael Caine board and got a reply that said that he sings in The Muppets Christmas Carol but is not a "very good singer" so ....

in other words BUMP !

Re: [Sorry, But STILL AN UNSOLVED MYSTERY]

Well, thanks anyway!

By the way, any progress on "the phone don't phone"?

Re: Singer in "Sleuth" (1972) [STILL AN UNSOLVED MYSTERY]

I should probably keep quiet about this after all these months, but I just want to let everyone who helped with this question that there's a little bit of news, albeit nothing we didn't really already figure out on our own:

On one of the sites--soundtrackcollector.com--I quoted early on, "lyncounion" posted the following on Jan. 15 (I didn't check until now):

"I'm pretty certain these are modern recordings.

"There are a number of giveaways, if you listen closely:

- The arrangements of "You Do Something to Me" and "Anything Goes" do not stylistically fit the big band music of the period in that they start with a vocal verse instead of an instrumental verse. More significantly, in "Anything Goes" there are multiple instrumental verses after the vocal verse, which very conveniently occur exactly when the characters in the film start talking.
- The length of "You Do Something to Me" is barely over 2 minutes, short for a 78 of this style.
- The acoustic bass, on all the numbers, is very loud and well defined in the mix. Recording technology was not sufficiently advanced in the 30s to capture a rich bass sound like this.
- The snare fill played by the drummer at the beginning of "Anything Goes" (right after the bell rings), is uncharacteristic of the period. It's also quite loud and trebly, which wasn't easily captured in older recordings.
- In the same song, in the first measure of the verse the guitar and bass play a figure with a strong backbeat that would sound more common in the rock era--rhythm sections didn't play like this in the 30's.

"I'm far from an expert on 1930's recordings or big-band music, but after listening to it on good headphones I think these are very well done fakes done by studio pros. I certainly could be wrong, but that so many people have been interested in this question and it hasn't been easily resolved makes it more likely that these vintage recordings don't actually exist. It's still a wonderful film.

"Your most humble servant,
St. John Lord Merridew."

Again, we already figured this out here; I just want to let everyone know.

Best,

salzmank


Re: Singer in "Sleuth" (1972) [STILL AN UNSOLVED MYSTERY]

Thanks for posting this update. It was an interesting read.

Re: Singer in "Sleuth" (1972) [STILL AN UNSOLVED MYSTERY]



Thanks for the update and hope we get a definitive answer sometime this century !



Happy New Year, btw.


any new mysteries for us ??? I hope I hope.

Re: Singer in "Sleuth" (1972) [PROBABLY FOREVER AN UNSOLVED MYSTERY]

Guess what? I found a singer who started in 1925 and it looks like in all his recordings he sings in what later became the standard. Short music into. Sings the song, short music break, then repeats the last two verses. I never heard of him until now, but he was very popular, so I think my theory before was correct. If a singer was popular enough, that is the way it went, but if the focus is the orchestra, the singer is second fiddle to that and has to wait until the orchestra starts before he gets to sing and usually does it fast, like so they can get back to the orchestra.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=SqZrZFT4i9U

Re: Singer in "Sleuth" (1972) [PROBABLY FOREVER AN UNSOLVED MYSTERY]

WillEd--

So does that just support the theory that these are modern recordings?

_____________________________

To everyone--

Thanks for your support--and some news!

I ended up dragged again down this rabbit hole because of that new Soundtrack Collector post, and now I found what I think is a new lead that, God willing, may actually result in something of--if not an answer, maybe a clearing up of some mysteries.

While most of the crew who worked on Sleuth have passed on, according to IMDb's Sleuth page, there was an uncredited re-recording mixer named Graham V. Hartstone who worked on the movie--and Mr. Hartstone is still alive!

After a bit of searching, I found an e-mail address for him here and sent him an e-mail. Now it all depends on (1) if he receives the e-mail, (2) if he responds to it, and (3) if he knows who the singer was/is. This will be interesting...

(I hope that, as he was the re-recording/dubbing mixer, he knows who it was.)

Now we just all hope and pray, right?

Re: Singer in "Sleuth" (1972) [PROBABLY FOREVER AN UNSOLVED MYSTERY]

It means it could be an old recording because the modern method was sometimes used then, but I still think they are modern recordings. My gut tells me they are not authentic from that period. The singer obviously is not someone famous and you still have the problem of three Cole Porter songs from the same singer and one of the songs is from the twenties while the other two are mid thirties and the orchestra is the same in all three. The two from the thirties could possibly be A and B sides on the same record. The twenties one is harder to explain.

Re: Singer in "Sleuth" (1972) [PROBABLY FOREVER AN UNSOLVED MYSTERY]

And, just like that, from a bang to a whimper.

D'après Mr. Hartstone:

"I have had this enquiry before, a few years ago and I'm afraid I wasn't able to spread any light on this conundrum. I don't know if anyone is around who worked for Palomar Pictures - there may be a paper trail showing who either paid or paid for the vocalist.

"Sorry I can't be more help.

"Kind regards

"Graham."

I suppose I am disappointed but not really surprised: the universe can't make things can't all that easy, eh? I will follow up upon Mr. Hartstone's recommendation but do not expect to find anything--and then shall leave this thread until I or someone else finds something new. So I expect this thread to go quiet once again for quite a while, but know that, if ever I do find something, I'll be back.

Best,

Salzmank


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