Books : What are you reading December 2016

What are you reading December 2016

Please post titles of books that you are reading along with comments, suggestions,recommendations etc

Re: What are you reading December 2016

Silent Night 3 (Fear Street Superchiller, #11) by R.L. Stine
The Life Story of The Flash by Iris Allen by Mark Waid & Brian Augustyn
The Immortal by Christopher Pike

Re: What are you reading December 2016

01. Little Women by Louisa May Alcott.

02. Holy Bible

Re: What are you reading December 2016

Reading 'The Line of Beauty' by Alan Hollinghurst. Only about 50 pages in of 500, so will be reading this into 2017.

Re: What are you reading December 2016

About two thirds of the way through Four to Score by Janet Evanovich. Great fun.









"Hogs have futures, I don't."
Dr. Johnny Fever

Re: What are you reading December 2016

Today I read the January 1909 edition of magazine Edison Phonograph Monthly, which was a magazine issued by Edison Records designed to help their dealers and jobbers sell the product (their range of phonograph records). Also included is the list of new records released for that month (a fascinating look into what kind of music was popular at the time).

It is public domain, and a reprint by the Library of Congress can be read here:
https://archive.org/details/edisonphonograph07moor




Have you played Atari today?

Re: What are you reading December 2016

I just finished "Smoke and Mirrors" by Elly Griffiths, this is the second book in her Mystery men series involving a magician and a copper who served together in WWII. I like her Ruth Galloway series better featuring a forensic archaeologist but this new series is growing on me. A lot of "twists and turns".
I just started reading the screenplay for "Fantastic Beasts and Where to Find Them". I also have the final book in the Whidbey Island YA series by Elizabeth George ,"The Edge of the Light", I'll probably read this over the weekend.

I will never let you part, for you are always in my heart: MJ
turn to page 394: Snape safety pin

Re: What are you reading December 2016

The Searchers - a dual history of the classic western and the true life story behind it. Really good.

The Devil in the White City - Historical nonfiction about the serial killer H. H. Holmes. Highly recommended.

The Three Emperors - Adventure series by William Dietrich;I love the series. It's Indiana Jones meets Patrick O'Brian.

The villainy you teach me I will execute-and it shall go hard but I will better the instruction.

Re: What are you reading December 2016

The 100 year Old Man who climbed out the window and disappeared by Jonas Jonasson (2012)

I am thoroughly enjoying this. It's quick paced, fun, a bit historic in a Forrest Gump sort of way.

Re: What are you reading December 2016

Just finished Paper Lion by George Plimpton and just started rereading Ragtime by E.L. Doctorow.

Sandbox Chief Commissioner.
Mad Monster Party for U.S. President 2020

Re: What are you reading December 2016

Some pulp fiction magazines from the 1930s, like The Shadow and Black Mask

Re: What are you reading December 2016

Having read Jane Eyre multiple times in my life and loving it more each time, I felt it was time to get through the other Bronte sister's story of a brooding, surly (or is he just misunderstood?) man--Wuthering Heights.

I tried to read it years ago, but didn't finish it. I'm about a third of the way in right now, so we shall see.

Re: What are you reading December 2016

Loving Amy: A Mother's Story by Janis Winehouse

Don't eva let nobody tell you you ain't strong enough

Re: What are you reading December 2016

Sounds like someone is trying to exploit her dead child's legacy

Re: What are you reading December 2016

"Sounds like someone is trying to exploit her dead child's legacy"

She's actually not. You should read it for yourself.

Don't eva let nobody tell you you ain't strong enough

Re: What are you reading December 2016

I had the same problem... Loved Jane Eyre and have read it multiple times but I've never been able to make it through Wuthering Heights. Any luck?

Re: What are you reading December 2016

Hi ConditionedResponse! It's good to meet someone who feels the same! I'm now a little more than halfway done with it. I'm finding I'm still not motivated that much to keep going with it to be honest, but I vowed to myself to finish it this time.

I'm amazed at how unlikeable all of the characters are. I've heard and read numerous times how this is an amazing tale of passionate love, but I find it to be more a textbook on abnormal psychology! I do wonder where Emily Bronte got her knowledge to write characters with such wild emotion. She died so young and was quite reclusive I've read.

I'll touch bases with you again when I finish.

Re: What are you reading December 2016

ConditionedResponse, I'm checking back in with you after I finished reading Wuthering Heights. I finally finished, but it was a real struggle all the way through. If I were you, I wouldn't even bother with it. My main complaints are that the characters are so unlikeable and static. I mustered up a little sympathy for one character, but it happened so near the end of the book I would hardly count it. The back of my book has a blurb that says something about WH showing the true nature of passionate love. I disagree. The whole thing is a display of demented, obsessive love and came across as creepy to me. I still maintain my opinion this is a textbook for abnormal psychology behaviors rather than passionate love!

I'm on to some lighter fare now after reading this depressing book--The Christmas Sweater by Glenn Beck.

Re: What are you reading December 2016

Old Man's War
Hyperion
Fletch Won
City and the Stars
Forge of God

Re: What are you reading December 2016

Just gave up on reading Umberto Eco's The Island of the Day Before, because it seemed massively uninteresting.

Now reading Jeff Vandmeer's Finch. Which doesn't seem a whole lot better.

Rusty chains and armoured pillows stuffed with silver pins

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Re: What are you reading December 2016

Hogfather by Terry Pratchett

Re: What are you reading December 2016

Started In Praise of Slow: How a Worldwide Movement is Challenging the Cult of Speed by Carl Honore on the train to work this morning. I'm only about 15 pages in, so I haven't formed an opinion yet. It does seem to have potential though.

It was a freebie I got from the publisher when I worked in a bookstore back in the 2000's. One of the many perks of working in a bookstore. Too bad it had to shut down (There's an Apple Store in its place now).








"Hogs have futures, I don't."
Dr. Johnny Fever

Re: What are you reading December 2016

From Bomba to Hip Hop: Puerto Rican Culture and Latino Identity by Juan Flores


"Arnold, my love, why must I worship you...and NEVER EVER tell?"

Re: What are you reading December 2016

The Train Ride by Jim Hall, recollections by a college football player in the South, stuck on a train he hopped (for fun) with his friend, swapping crazy true stories, but they seem exaggerated.


CC:https://s-media-cache-ak0.pinimg.com/736x/28/b3/81/28b3814d7598e079965170c781cf7dc8.jpg

Re: What are you reading December 2016

A book-length essay. Unquiet Landscape (about 20th-century English painters and painting), by Christopher Neve

A biography, Vanished Act: The Life and Art of Weldon Kees, by James Reidel

And some fiction, I haven’t decided yet, but maybe Moonglow, the new novel by Michael Chabon


Put it on a tripod!

Re: What are you reading December 2016

LaRose by Louise Erdrich

While out hunting, a man accidentally kills his neighbor's young son and decides to give that family his own young son in return.

It's a beautiful story about grief and guilt and revenge and justice and family and a million other things.

Re: What are you reading December 2016

"Charlie ramène sa science", by A. Fischetti and G. Lecointre.
Collection of science articles published in Charlie Hebdo before 2015.
Illustrated.
About less than quarter of them survive last year's homicidal attack.

Eye opening, but frustrating. Some subjects are worth a whole book.
Especially those about the current 'spiritual' attack against scientific materialism.
...


Manelle
"to tax and to please, no more to love and to be wise, is not given to men"

Re: What are you reading December 2016

I've been on a Stephen King kick lately. I finished Joyland and really liked it even through I cried at the end. I'm mostly through The Gunslinger but I'm pausing to read The Great Gatsby with my kid. Not sure why I haven't read it yet.

Re: What are you reading December 2016

Finished reading King of Foxes by Raymond Feist. Second in his Conclave of Shadows series, it continues the story of a James Bond-like fantasy character as he works to bring down a despotic Duke and the wizard who controls him. It's good, not great, doesn't really add much to the Midkemia story/history Feist is building up.

Next up: The Godless, by Ben Peek. A friend gave me this book, said he loved it. I'll give it a try.

Re: What are you reading December 2016

I'm trying to get through a book called "Seize the Day" written by a hospice worker in France.

It's a collection of her experiences of her dying patients and I thought it was going to be full of insights into how to live your LIFE better while you're not yet dying.

That was even the blurb on the cover.

Instead it's just wall-to-wall "Patricia died last night and we're all sad."

There aren't really any insights or pieces of advice.

The funny thing is, I don't even remember buying this book. Now I feel all eerie.




Re: What are you reading December 2016

"Sixkill" by Robert B. Parker

A little Spenser, haven't read one in a long time. a fat slob of an actor is accused of the rape and murder of a young woman and Spenser is hired by the defense attorney's to find out if he really is guilty or innocent because the evidence is unclear. I think I last read a Spenser book back when "Spenser For Hire" was on television. The fact that Robert Urich starred in the TV show is what got me into the books.

Re: What are you reading December 2016

Started A Monster Calls by Patrick Ness this morning. Loved J.A. Bayona's The Orphanage and want to read this before seeing his adaptation.


Re: What are you reading December 2016


A Monster Calls by Patrick Ness

Really liked that and definitely didn't cry at the end or anything.


Re: What are you reading December 2016

Started The Magician King by Lev Grossman yesterday. It's already a lot more relaxing and fun than the first, probably on account of just being able to get right into it.


Re: What are you reading December 2016


The Magician King by Lev Grossman

Wasn't on a par with the first book but I really enjoyed that too.


Re: What are you reading December 2016

Paul Auster - The Book of Illusions

Rusty chains and armoured pillows stuffed with silver pins

Re: What are you reading December 2016

A bunch of Bond books by Ian Fleming. Right now I'm on You Only Live Twice.

Re: What are you reading December 2016

The Winter reading season is just starting here.

Tried reading halfway through Roger Zelany's (acknowledged? Fantasy Classic) 'Nine Princes in Amber'/Chronicles of Amber series, 1970. Mew,,,,it's has these endless top-of-the-head spewing passages that want to pass for imaginative scenes but read rather poorly :( mix that with some hippi-ish dialogues like "Hey Man" being ridiculously uttered by immortal gods? Ya,,O.K. pass.

Since I enjoyed the television series 'LoveJoy' until the fourth season when it goes in the toilet and runs out of ideas and bored looking actors, decided to purchase a large lot of Jonathan Gash 'LoveJoy' novels, started with 'Spend Game' since it is supposed to be one of the best and so-far for a person like me who usually hates-on Mystery Novels, this one turned out to be just as fun as the series, the character is a little more developed as to be expected in a novel.

Looking forward to reading more of these Jonathan Gash novels!

Picked up Will Durant's first book I 'Our Oriental Heritage' of his 'Story of Civilization Series' A massive awe-inspiring achievement that still leaps and bounds with easy intellectual vitality.

Truly impressed with Mr.Durant's ability to compact and convey the essential points of history in a manner that constantly leaves you wanting to read more and more. Just picked up his 'The Age of Voltaire' which is one period and personage in history that fascinates- for me anyways :)

Enjoy!

Re: What are you reading December 2016

I've been reading articles from a 1980s British magazine called The Home Computer Course, such as those where they review the then-new computers.

Some of these computers were successful, many weren't. The computers they reviewed include:
Sinclair ZX Spectrum - Very popular
Oric-1 - Moderately popular
Commodore 64 - Very popular
Lynx - Flop
BBC Micro - Popular
Atari 400/800 - Popular in some markets, but not the UK
Dragon 32 - Popular but short-lived
Jupiter Ace - Flop
Epson HX-20 - Successful, but very niche
TI 99/4A - Moderately popular in the US, a flop in the UK
Sinclair ZX81 - Very popular
Commodore Vic-20 - Very popular
Sord M5 - Flop
Tandy Color Computer - Popular in the US, a flop in the UK
Mattel Aquarius - Flop
Sharp MZ-711 - I don't know
Tandy MC-10 - Flop
Apple IIe - Popular in many countries, but not in the UK
Acorn Electron - Reasonably popular
Memotech MTX-512 - Flop (even though the magazine was enthusiastic about it)
Osbourse-1 - Successful, but very niche
Commodore Pet 4032 - Successful, but very niche
Sinclair QL - Moderately popular (borderlines on flop)
Research Machines 380Z - Successful, but very niche

None of these are PC clones. PC clones were strictly business computers at that point, at least in the UK. You could buy a Commodore 64 for £200, or a PC clone like the ACT Apricot for £2174, needless to say many people chose the former.

Have you played Atari today?

Re: What are you reading December 2016

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Outlander. I liked everything up until the time-travel. The writing was quite good, creative, and interesting. The amount of time actually spent in 1945 is actual pretty extensive. I had gotten a free preview of the book on Amazon Kindle, and I enjoyed all of that so much I paid for the rest of the Kindle book.

Unfortunately, fairly shortly after the free preview ends, so does the 1945 timeline. It then switches to the 1700s, and once she gets captured by the Highlanders the writing seems to just turn into your average run-of-the-mill neanderthalish historical action/sex/violence/romance writing with time-travel thrown in (like this hasn't been done before). I'm no longer intrigued or impressed, so I'm not going to continue.

(I chose to investigate the book because I was considering purchasing the TV series, but some of the IMDB reviews said the TV series really overdid some of the extreme scenes and that the book was better. I'm not usually a fan of these fantasy-type novel series so I perhaps could have predicted I wouldn't like the books, but I'm still glad I read the first part, and I still maintain that it was quite good.)
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Re: What are you reading December 2016

Now I am reading articles from The Home Computer Advanced Course, the follow up the magazine series I mentioned earlier. Both were 1980s magazines introducing people to using home computers.

So far, I have read its reviews of the following computers: Commodore 64, Aim 65, Dragon 64, Spectravideo 318, Atari XL, Sharp PC-5000, and Apricot ACT.

Later today, I plan to read the articles about the Oric Atmos and Colour Genie.




Have you played Atari today?

Re: What are you reading December 2016

I'm now reading The Man Who Invented Christmas: How Charles Dickens's A Christmas Carol Rescued His Career and Revived our Holiday Spirits by Les Standiford.

I'm toward the end of Part One right now. I've enjoyed learning about the beginnings of the novel publishing industry and about Dickens's four month tour of America and how his impressions changed afterward.

I also found it interesting how what we call a bestselling book today in terms of the proportion of copies sold to a literate population would have been laughed at in Victorian England as paltry.

Re: What are you reading December 2016

I just started Innocence by Kathleen Tessaro. I hope to be finished with it by New Year's Eve. I've got big plans for my first January book.

I've also just started a new non-fiction book--The Hidden Link Between Adrenaline and Stress by Dr. Archibald D. Hart.

Re: What are you reading December 2016

I am mercifully finishing Innocence by Kathleen Tessaro today. It is a disaster of a novel. Of all the annoyances it holds, the biggest one is the author's constant use of flashback, and especially with no cue to the reader it is a flashback. Finally after a while it's obvious every other chapter is a flashback. Heaven forbid if I hadn't opened the book for a day or two because I would have no remembrance of what had happened, or if I were reading the past or the present or the future or whatever the last time I read. The book is so choppy and discombobulated it almost makes me angry.

The structure of this book being so non-reader friendly made it slug along so slowly for me. I finished her first book Elegance in three days. I never dreamed I would be going into week 3 with this one.

Re: What are you reading December 2016

Dragon's Egg by Robert L. Forward, the really-hard (I mean, reaally hard, like diamond-hard) science fiction novel about an species of tiny pancake-like intelligent life forms called cheela living on the surface of a neutron star and that think and live one million times faster than the humans, and their eventual contact and communication with human beings, a classic example of the hard science fiction genre. I am already finishing it actually, started a few weeks ago.

While the beginning of the book is really boring and slow in the first chapters before the cheela appear (there are only human scientists doing science and discovering the neutron star with too much scientific terminology), after the cheela appear and their civilization starts evolving and individual characters appear the story gets really good and exciting, with wars, barbarians raids, religion and crazy prophets and even a few occasional sex scenes, all between tiny star pancake aliens, and the part near the end where I am the story is getting even emotional and sad. I was scared in the beginning it might have been a boring novel but it definitely wasn't.

I guess scientists can really write good science fiction when they are talented and want to. One day I might buy and read the sequel, Starquake.

"I know one thing: that I know nothing" - Socrates

Re: What are you reading December 2016

Finished reading Exile's Return, by Raymond Feist. Third in his Conclave of Shadows trilogy and by far the best of the three. It starts as a fish-out-of-water tale as the deposed Duke of Olasko (a villain in the first two books) is dropped onto a foreign continent where he is a nobody and known nothing. He survives and learns. The story really gets interesting when he encounters a band of men who possess a mysterious artifact which has vast implications for the world. This whole series is setup for the later series to come.

With that series done I'll focus on Ben Peek's The Godless.

Re: What are you reading December 2016

Dangereuse amérique, by Noël Mamère and Patrick Farbiaz.
Reading about how not to go at war against Saddam Hussein, back then.
Pretty unreal reading it now.

Manelle
"to tax and to please, no more to love and to be wise, is not given to men"

Re: What are you reading December 2016

Now reading The Radiant Seas by Catherine Asaro, the direct sequel to the fantastic Primary Inversion, both from the hard science fiction space opera series Saga of the Skolian Empire. Primary Inversion is the book I consider the best novel of any genre of fiction I have ever read in my life, not only of science fiction, I felt so much in love with the story, the universe of the Skolian Empire and above all the character of Sauscony, and thus it was inevitable I would buy and read the sequel. So far I am only on the first 60 pages, but it is already going as great as anything I could expect by the genius that is Catherine. Each page I read I fall even more in love with the couple of Soz and Jaibriol and can't have enough of them, they are so perfect together.

Already thinking of buying Undercity, Skyfall, Schism and The Final Key, the prequel novels of the series. I just wished though that she was more well-known and appreciated by the science fictins fans. It's a little sad sometimes feeling like you are the only fan in the world of a certain author.

"I know one thing: that I know nothing" - Socrates

Re: What are you reading December 2016

Kinda ironically right now "Star Wars: Lost Stars" by Claudia Gray

It the journey from the fall of the Old Republic to "Star Wars: The Force Awakens" from the Imperial side. It follows two 8yr olds (Thane & Ciena) from the Outer Rim who want to be Imperial pilots because they want to fly the best, newest starfighters. I'm up to where "Star Wars: A New Hope" ended and at this point Thane and Ciena (now young adults and Imperial Academy graduates) are having second thoughts having watched innocents get blown up on Alderaan and friends get blown up on the Death Star.
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