Books : Few more good books to buy and read:

Few more good books to buy and read:

https://www.amazon.com/Performative-Assembly-Flexner-Lectures-College/dp/0674967755/ref=pd_sim_14_3?_encoding=UTF8&psc=1&refRID=2J34KG278EX06G0PG470

Notes Toward a Performative Theory of Assembly

Judith Butler elucidates the dynamics of public assembly under prevailing economic and political conditions, analyzing what they signify and how. Understanding assemblies as plural forms of performative action, Butler extends her theory of performativity to argue that precarity―the destruction of the conditions of livability―has been a galvanizing force and theme in today’s highly visible protests.

Butler broadens the theory of performativity beyond speech acts to include the concerted actions of the body. Assemblies of physical bodies have an expressive dimension that cannot be reduced to speech, for the very fact of people gathering “says” something without always relying on speech. Drawing on Hannah Arendt’s view of action, yet revising her claims about the role of the body in politics, Butler asserts that embodied ways of coming together, including forms of long-distance solidarity, imply a new understanding of the public space of appearance essential to politics.

Butler links assembly with precarity by pointing out that a body suffering under conditions of precarity still persists and resists, and that mobilization brings out this dual dimension of corporeal life. Just as assemblies make visible and audible the bodies that require basic freedoms of movement and association, so do they expose coercive practices in prison, the dismantling of social democracy, and the continuing demand for establishing subjugated lives as mattering, as equally worthy of life. By enacting a form of radical solidarity in opposition to political and economic forces, a new sense of “the people” emerges, interdependent, grievable, precarious, and persistent.


https://www.amazon.com/Undoing-Demos-Neoliberalisms-Stealth-Revolution/dp/1935408534/ref=pd_sim_14_1?_encoding=UTF8&psc=1&refRID=2J34KG278EX06G0PG470


Neoliberal rationality -- ubiquitous today in statecraft and the workplace, in jurisprudence, education, and culture -- remakes everything and everyone in the image of homo oeconomicus. What happens when this rationality transposes the constituent elements of democracy into an economic register? In Undoing the Demos, Wendy Brown explains how democracy itself is imperiled. The demos disintegrates into bits of human capital; concerns with justice bow to the mandates of growth rates, credit ratings, and investment climates; liberty submits to the imperative of human capital appreciation; equality dissolves into market competition; and popular sovereignty grows incoherent. Liberal democratic practices may not survive these transformations. Radical democratic dreams may not either.

In an original and compelling argument, Brown explains how and why neoliberal reason undoes the political form and political imaginary it falsely promises to secure and reinvigorate. Through meticulous analyses of neoliberalized law, political practices, governance, and education, she charts the new common sense. Undoing the Demos makes clear that for democracy to have a future, it must become an object of struggle and rethinking.


and

https://www.amazon.com/Brief-History-Neoliberalism-David-Harvey/dp/0199283273/ref=pd_sim_14_3?_encoding=UTF8&psc=1&refRID=FKGHZX0084XHKBD3F9Z2

https://www.amazon.com/Birth-Biopolitics-Lectures-Coll%C3%A8ge-1978-1979/dp/0312203411/ref=pd_sim_14_1?_encoding=UTF8&psc=1&refRID=FKGHZX0084XHKBD3F9Z2


https://www.amazon.com/dp/B00T25NPUG?psc=1

Re: Few more good books to buy and read:

Sounds lame, I'll skip these

Re: Few more good books to buy and read:

I'll wait till they're out in pop-up.

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