Books : What are you reading January 2017.

Re: What are you reading January 2017.

I'm reading one murder mystery book by James Peterson and I have another to read by Tami Hoag.

Re: What are you reading January 2017.

God Don't Like Ugly by Mary Monroe.

Don't eva let nobody tell you you ain't strong enough

Re: What are you reading January 2017.

The Wrestling by Simon Garfield..look back on British wrestling in the 60's and 70's.

Jumpin' Jack Flash: David Litvinoff and the Rock’n’Roll Underworld bu Kieron Pim.


Occult Paris: The Lost Magic of the Belle Époque by Tobias Churlton.

Re: What are you reading January 2017.

I'm now into books on negotiation. I have eight titles on the subject on my to-read list. Finishing tomorrow Pitch Anything by Oren Klaff, and sunday will start Getting to Yes by Roger Fisher and William Ury.

μηδὲν ἄγαν

Re: What are you reading January 2017.

...I am perusing "Blake's Poetry and Designs" with illustrations. One of my all time favorite author/poets.

Re: What are you reading January 2017.

Reading Now

1. The Lost Continent of Pan – Susan B. Martinez
2. The Stevensons - Jean H. Baker

Books to Read

Borscht Belt
Infinite Awareness
Time of the Quickening
Field Guide to Getting Lost
Pedro Pamaro


"We are healthy only to the extent that our ideas are humane" Kurt Vonnegut

Re: What are you reading January 2017.

Dragonfly: An Epic Adventure of Survival in Outer Space by Bryan Burrows.








"Hogs have futures, I don't."
Dr. Johnny Fever

Re: What are you reading January 2017.

I got into Raymond Chandler toward the end of 2016 after watching The Big Sleep and exploring old time radio detective shows (Jeff Regan, Pat Novak, Dragnet, Richard Diamond, Box 13, Boston Blackie, Candy Matson).

I read "Farewell, My Lovely" after The Big Sleep. Good stuff, love Marlowe. I bought "The High Window" last month or so, but in the meantime I was reading "The Serpent Club" by Tom Coffey, still am as I only read on my breaks at work and before work. It's pretty good too. Love the protagonist's cynical perspective.

https://www.amazon.com/Serpent-Club-Tom-Coffey/dp/0671028278

Also trying to get it done (almost through) so I can read more Marlowe. I've also got a bunch of the Marlowe radio show to listen to in good time.

I recently read Girl on the Train before that, and Zeke & Ned by Larry McMurtry (Lonesome Dove, Berrybender Narratives).

"They knew, and they let it happen! TO KIDS! It could have happened to any of us!"

Re: What are you reading January 2017.

Everyone working in our library system is supposed to join in on a 'library challenge' and read Juvenile and Young Adult books the next two months. I have a few in mind, but could use some suggestions. I'm not really into Sci-Fi, but any suggestions would be appreciated.

Thanks in advance.

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Re: What are you reading January 2017.

What about Hunger Games? It's an easy read. I read the trilogy in a week.

μηδὲν ἄγαν

Re: What are you reading January 2017.

So did I. That's the problem, I've already read most of the popular ones. I've read the Rot and Ruin series, the Zom-B series, the Lunar Chronicles, etc. I need to find some more obscure ones, but thanks for the comment.


~*~*~ ~*~*~

Re: What are you reading January 2017.

When I was a kid I read the Tom Swift Jr. books. You can sometimes find them in large used book stores. Makes me sad kids today don't know them. They are like the Hardy Boys books but with more sci-fi.

His Dark Materials by Pullman is good.

My Brother Sam is Dead.

A Dog's Purpose and A Dog's Journey are good. They are meant for everyone though.

Re: What are you reading January 2017.

James Crumley - The Last Good Kiss

A Christmas prezzie from the wife, and she appears to have picked a good un. Hard boiled private detective stuff, with some really witty, florid prose to capture the mood.

Rusty chains and armoured pillows stuffed with silver pins

Re: What are you reading January 2017.

After much delay, I finally finished the 1982 book How to Take Good Pictures - A Photo Guide by Kodak.

It's good, but has some unusual aspects. For one thing, a lot of the photography discussed is for 35mm SLR cameras, something Kodak hadn't made for years. However, Kodak's main business by then was its film, not its cameras.

I do a lot of film photography so some of the information is relevant to me, though some parts of it aren't (I don't think they make tungsten film anymore).

I am now working on Eyewitness Guides: Money, a 1990 non-fiction book for children. It was one of my favourites as a kid.


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Re: What are you reading January 2017.

The Natural Way Of Things by Charlotte Wood.

Not for the faint of heart; dark and despairing.

Re: What are you reading January 2017.

About a 3rd of the way through 'Bonfire of the Vanities' by Tom Wolfe (640 pages).

This book is turning out to be quite a handful. Mr. Wolfe is attempting a grand satire of late 20th century life in New York and this book has some chapters of absolute brilliance, he has managed to start bringing several converging plot lines together in a workable, sensible fashion and has you eagerly anticipating the head-on climax of their imminent collision.

Also just finished book one of Ikku Jippensha's 'Hizakurige' which is a comic tale that follows Yaji and Kita as they journey across Japan in the early 1800's. This translation (I think it's the only one) is by Thomas Satchell and has the woodblock pictures reproduced of the ongoing stories with the chapters. Satchell decided to do a literal translation because alot of the humor is innuendo and plays on place names or words but quite a bit of the bawdy slapstick humor does manage to make it across and it is kinda of fun to rewrite the passages that you don't get in your head until you kinda figure out from the characters and the scenario what is so funny?

Plus it is also a 19th century Feudal Japan traveling guide, you get to see what someone in Japan might have seen back in the day, although they do eat alot, take hot baths, and drink a heck of alot of Sake and make passes at almost anything that moves on two legs-LOL......only the names seem to change :)

Re: What are you reading January 2017.

Thinner by Stephen King.

Don't eva let nobody tell you you ain't strong enough

Re: What are you reading January 2017.

I have just read Ransom Riggs' Miss Peregrine series.

Re: What are you reading January 2017.

Lately, I've been reading more articles from old magazines. I've been reading computer reviews from a 1980s magazine called "Personal Computing Today", articles from 1980s editions of Personal Computer News (e.g. an article on the "Microdrive" add-on for the ZX Spectrum computer), as well as vintage adverts and computer reviews from 1980s editions of "Your Computer".

Also, this month I read the April 1909 edition of "Edison Phonograph Monthly", a magazine issued by Edison Records to help retailers sell the product.

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Re: What are you reading January 2017.

Unmentionable The Victorian Lady's Guide to Sex, Marriage and Manners by Therese Oneill.

It's hilarious and sad at the same time. I'm really enjoying it and happy that I didn't live during that time period.


~*~*~ ~*~*~

Re: What are you reading January 2017.

I got my fingers all tangled up in a corset today, you have my sympathies 😶

Re: What are you reading January 2017.

Paul Stanley's autobiography Face the Music

Re: What are you reading January 2017.

NO, you have MY sympathy.

Oh, but you didn't say YOU were the one wearing it.



~*~*~ ~*~*~

Re: What are you reading January 2017.

Yesterday I read volume 1 of the manga Mar. I enjoyed it.




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Re: What are you reading January 2017.

Have finished LIVE AND LET DIE by Ian Fleming.

Am now reading MOONRAKER.

ant-mac

Re: What are you reading January 2017.

I just "discovered" the Mrs. Bundle mysteries by Allison Cesario Paton, I like reading series and this was recommended for readers who like M.C. Beaton's novels. Its about an old woman in Vermont that decides to become a detective, its not as good as Hamish Macbeth or Agatha Raisin but I'm still enjoying the series. At this stage of my life, I prefer mostly light reading to get my mind off of the normal aches and pains of getting older.
I would recommend the series for people who enjoy "cozy mysteries."

I will never let you part, for you are always in my heart: MJ
turn to page 394: Snape safety pin

Re: What are you reading January 2017.

A Man Called Ove.

Delightful.

Re: What are you reading January 2017.

Today I read volume 2 of the manga "Mar".

From magazines, I read the following:
Review of the Oric-1 computer from the March 1983 edition of "Personal Computing Today".

Review of the Tandy MC-10 from the October 1983 edition of "Your Computer", along with news section of the magazine, and its article on various programming languages (such as Forth and Pascal). From the same magazine I read classic adverts for the Acorn Electron, Oric-1 (a British computer popular in France), Texas Instruments 99/4A, and Tandy Model 100.





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Re: What are you reading January 2017.

Better off Thread by Amanda Lee.It's part of the Emboidery Mystery series.It's set during Christmas.It's the last book in the series ...

Re: What are you reading January 2017.

Finished The Radiant Seas by Catherine Asaro last Friday. Fantastic book, almost as great as Primary Inversion. Already planning on buying Undercity, Skyfall, Schism and The Final Key to read the whole Ruby Dynasty on the chronological order.

And then to prepare myself before reading Undercity (and also to finally read many of my older books that I haven't read since I bought them) I am planning on reading many novels with the thematics of criminals, the criminal world and the underground world.

The first one, which I started yesterday and am reading now, is the Romantic German play The Robbers ("Die Räuber") by Friedrich Schiller, which I already had for some years. I only got through the first two scenes, but I am already liking it a lot. It is reminding me a little of Goethe's Faust, which I love (even though I have read only a few parts). I am sensing I am really going to like the characters of Karl and Spiegelberg, specially Spiegelberg, who is such a figure.

"I know one thing: that I know nothing" - Socrates

Re: What are you reading January 2017.

I recommend "My Most-Wanted Mom: Raised by a Marijuana Smuggling Queen." It's a truly remarkable true story that spans the "golden age of marijuana." A link is:
http://kck.st/2jDgu3a

Re: What are you reading January 2017.

The Dying Grass, by William T. Vollman. Hard to get into and stay into, but a definite journey.




Shameless plug: http://www.blurb.com/b/7648359-phantasmagoria

Re: What are you reading January 2017.

Haruki Murakami - Kafka on the Shore

I really didn't care for the last Murakami I read, A Wild Sheep Chase, but thought I'd give him another chance. Largely because I've got three books of his to get through from Christmas. It's starting out in familiar style ("I will go here, things will happen" - he goes, things happen), but I'm being open-minded yet.

Rusty chains and armoured pillows stuffed with silver pins

Re: What are you reading January 2017.


Haruki Murakami - Kafka on the Shore

Oh dear.


I really didn't care for the last Murakami I read

Uh-huh...

thought I'd give him another chance

Oh dear, oh dear...

It's starting out in familiar style

Yeah, yeah it does...



I'm being facetious somewhat but yeah. My feelings about Murakami are documented here for anyone bored enough to look.
To put it succinctly though; he's a tiresome repetitive bastard.

Re: What are you reading January 2017.



Yeah, I already gathered you weren't a fan. I've read a few, and I'm a tiresome repetitive bastard myself, so it might yet work out.

Rusty chains and armoured pillows stuffed with silver pins

Re: What are you reading January 2017.

I just finished volume 3 of the manga "Mär". Enjoyed it.

I read a vintage magazine advertisement from 1983 for the "Interface 2", an add-on for the popular Sinclair ZX Spectrum computer.



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Re: What are you reading January 2017.

Just finished Stephen King's Thinner and really enjoyed it. I prefer the novel's ending over the film's.

Don't eva let nobody tell you you ain't strong enough

Re: What are you reading January 2017.

Kiss Tomorrow Goodbye: The Barbara Payton Story by John O'Dowd

Barbara Payton is the most epic Hollywood crash and burn you've never heard of. In 1950, Barbara Payton was making $10,000 a week and co-starring with the likes of James Cagney and Gregory Peck. In 1967 she died at the age of 39 as a bloated, battered, alcoholic $5.00 prostitute who was missing several of her front teeth.



Never trust anyone who reads only one book.

Re: What are you reading January 2017.

"Kiss Tomorrow Goodbye: The Barbara Payton Story by John O'Dowd

Barbara Payton is the most epic Hollywood crash and burn you've never heard of. In 1950, Barbara Payton was making $10,000 a week and co-starring with the likes of James Cagney and Gregory Peck. In 1967 she died at the age of 39 as a bloated, battered, alcoholic $5.00 prostitute who was missing several of her front teeth."

Talk about tragic.

Don't eva let nobody tell you you ain't strong enough

Re: What are you reading January 2017.


"Kiss Tomorrow Goodbye: The Barbara Payton Story by John O'Dowd

Barbara Payton is the most epic Hollywood crash and burn you've never heard of. In 1950, Barbara Payton was making $10,000 a week and co-starring with the likes of James Cagney and Gregory Peck. In 1967 she died at the age of 39 as a bloated, battered, alcoholic $5.00 prostitute who was missing several of her front teeth."


Talk about tragic.



It is. Hollywood can be quite the cesspool.






Never trust anyone who reads only one book.

Re: What are you reading January 2017.

Have finished MOONRAKER by Ian Fleming.

Am now reading DIAMONDS ARE FOREVER.

ant-mac

Re: What are you reading January 2017.

Today I read a review of the Sord M5 computer from the August 1983 edition of "Computing Today".

I also read an article from the March 1984 edition of "Computer Choice" which compared three very low-end/low-cost home computers: The Laser 200, the Sinclair ZX81 and the Tandy MC-10. They were rather critical of all three, particularly the MC-10 (which they called "a machine to avoid"). Of the three computers, the ZX81 was the most successful.

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Re: What are you reading January 2017.

I read issue 14 of The Phonogram. It dates from 1901.

The magazine claims that having music at dinner time improves digestion...any truth to that?

It's strange to think that everyone who bought the magazine back in 1901 is dead. Their children are dead. Their grandchildren are probably dead.

Yet here I was, reading the magazine on my computer.


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Re: What are you reading January 2017.

Today I read the following:

A comparison of the Colour Genie, Dragon 32 and Acorn Electron from the January 1984 edition of "Computer Choice". I'm surprised they didn't like the Dragon 32 very much, it is one of my favourite computers to emulate.

A review of the Lynx (not the handheld) from the January 1984 edition of "Your Computer". To be exact, they reviewed the "updated" version with extra RAM that was introduced at the time. They hated it.

An article on pocket computers in the May 1982 edition of "Micro Computer Printout", a very obscure magazine. These computers were slightly larger than a calculator, had a LCD display, and could be programmed in BASIC, a popular programming language of the period. These pocket computers were very different indeed to the now-infamous "transportable" computers like the Osbourne-1 (which weren't really portable at all).


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Re: What are you reading January 2017.

Finished Susan Orlean's The Orchid Thief a few nights ago. It was a very quick read, and I enjoyed it quite a bit, although I wasn't nearly as emotionally engaged with the book as I was with Charlie Kaufman's film, Adaptation.

Just started Sinclair Lewis' It Can't Happen Here today.

Re: What are you reading January 2017.

Kate Mosse: "The Mistletoe Bride and Other Haunting Tales."

https://www.amazon.co.uk/Mistletoe-Bride-Other-Haunting-Tales/dp/1409148041

It was a pound-store find -- a £14.99 hard cover for £1, yay!

Spooky short stories based on folklore and legends from England and France.



Re: What are you reading January 2017.

1) News of the World by Paulette Jiles (finished) - 4 of 5 stars - Very well written Historical Fiction/Western. Not sure if it brings a whole lot new to the genre; but it certainly is heartfelt.

2) The Brooklyn Follies by Paul Auster (finished) - 4 of 5 stars - This is my 4th Auster novel and he is quickly becoming one of favorite authors. This one didn't blow me away the way that The New York Trilogy and The Book of Illusions did, but it is very good none the less.

3) Revolutionary Road by Richard Yates (finished) - 5 of 5 stars - I am not sure that I would have liked this book when I was younger; but it really worked for me now. Very sad tale of a pair of disillusioned dreamer being crushed under the weigh of mid-20th century suburban American conformity.

4) Ratner's Star by Don DeLillo (finished) - 3.5 of 5 stars - Early DeLillo which feels like he is trying to find his voice and trying on Thomas Pynchon's from Gravity's Rainbow to see how it fits. I like his later stuff better and found this one to be impenetrable in places.

Re: What are you reading January 2017.

Well, I've finished DIAMONDS ARE FOREVER by Ian Fleming.

Am now reading FROM RUSSIA WITH LOVE. I remember really enjoying this one the last time I read it.

ant-mac

Re: What are you reading January 2017.

The Tyranny of Words by Stuart Chase

Re: What are you reading January 2017.

Finished "Nomad" by "Alan Partridge". It was OK, not as funny as his first book, "I, Partridge: we have to talk about Alan", though.




You're my wife now.
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