Books : Examples of Great Prose.

Examples of Great Prose.

CONRAD - The edge of a colossal jungle, so dark-green as to be almost black, fringed with white surf, ran straight, like a ruled line, far, far away along a blue sea whose glitter was blurred by a creeping mist. The sun was fierce, the land seemed to glisten and drip with steam.

Re: Examples of Great Prose.

Few men realize
 that their life, the very essence of their character, their
 capabilities and their audacities, are only the expression of their 
belief in the safety of their surroundings. The courage, the
 composure, the confidence; the emotions and principles; every great 
and every insignificant thought belongs not to the individual but to
 the crowd: to the crowd that believes blindly in the irresistible 
force of its institutions and of its morals, in the power of its
police and of its opinion.

Joseph Conrad, An Outpost of Progress

If history is something like the memory of mankind and represents the spirit of mankind brooding over man's past, we must imagine it as working not to accentuate antagonisms or to ratify old party-cries but to find the unities that underlie the differences and to see all lives as part of the one web of life. Studying the quarrels of an ancient day he can at least seek to understand both parties to the struggle and he must want to understand them better than they understood themselves; watching them entangled in the net of time and circumstance he can take pity on them - these men who perhaps had no pity for one another.

Sir Herbert Butterfield, The Whig Interpretation of History

Re: Examples of Great Prose.

I cannot present quotations, but there are some books which more than most others make me admire their language:


Fridrich Hölderlin: Hyperion. (In German)

Sören Kierkegaard: Stadier på livets vej. (in Danish)

Jens Peter Jakobsen: Niels Lyhne. (in Danish)

Astrid Ehrencron-Kidde: Den signede dag. (in Danish)


I am somewhat suspicious about this list. Why are there no prose in Swedish or in English?

Danish is my mother thong, but I have lived in Sweden in 65 years, and have certainly read a larger part of Swedish literature than most people.


Re: Examples of Great Prose.

There was a young man from Nantucket,
Whose dick was so long he could suck it,
He said with a grin,
As he wiped off his chin,
If my ear was a *beep* I would *beep* it

Re: Examples of Great Prose.

Fantastic...

Re: Examples of Great Prose.

That was verse not prose.

"It is a good thing for an uneducated man to read books of quotations" Winston Churchill (1874-1965)

Re: Examples of Great Prose.

Don't be so dull.

Re: Examples of Great Prose.


Don't be so dull.


Appy polly loggies.




"It is a good thing for an uneducated man to read books of quotations" Winston Churchill (1874-1965)

Re: Examples of Great Prose.

You were right of course, but I thought it too good a limerick to care about it being out of place...

Re: Examples of Great Prose.

I stand by the limerick

Re: Examples of Great Prose.

A Londonderry Air

You can tell by the angle
Of Lord Londonderry's hat
That he is not a member
Of the proletariat.
And in case this may escape you,
A reminder of it shows
Also very clearly
In the angle of his nose.

Re: Examples of Great Prose.

What's the only word in the English language with 6 silent letters?

Londonderry


Re: Examples of Great Prose.

That was verse not prose.

"It is a good thing for an uneducated man to read books of quotations" Winston Churchill (1874-1965)

Re: Examples of Great Prose.

conrad uses too many adjectives, he cant offer a noun without attaching an adjective, you must remember what congreve advised: "Epithets are beautiful in Poetry, but make Prose languishing and cold",

also remember aristotle, "A third form is the use of long, unseasonable, or frequent epithets. It is appropriate enough for a poet to talk of "white milk," in prose such epithets are sometimes lacking in appropriateness or, when spread too thickly, plainly reveal the author turning his prose into poetry. "

Re: Examples of Great Prose.

Here's one, the opening of Thomas Pynchon's Gravity's Rainbow. Nightmarish.

A screaming comes across the sky. It has happened before, but there is nothing to compare it to now.

It is too late. The Evacuation still proceeds, but it's all theatre. There are no lights inside the cars. No light anywhere. Above him lift girders old as an iron queen, and glass somewhere far above that would let the light of day through. But it's night. He's afraid of the way the glass will fall--soon--it will be a spectacle: the fall of a crystal palace. But coming down in total blackout, without one glint of light, only great invisible crashing.

Inside the carriage, which is built on several levels, he sits in velveteen darkness, with nothing to smoke, feeling metal nearer and farther rub and connect, steam escaping in puffs, a vibration in the carriage's frame, a poising, an uneasiness, all the others pressed in around, feeble ones, second sheep, all out of luck and time: drunks, old veterans still in shock from ordnance 20 years obsolete, hustlers in city clothes, derelicts, exhausted women with more children than it seems could belong to anyone, stacked about among the rest of the things to be carried out to salvation. Only the nearer faces are visible at all, and at that only as half-silvered images in a view finder, green-stained VIP faces remembered behind bulletproof windows speeding through the city....

Re: Examples of Great Prose.

Alfred Hayes from his novel In Love:


Here I am, the man in the hotel bar said to the pretty girl, almost forty, with a small reputation, some money in the bank, a convenient address, a telephone number easily available, this look on my face you think peculiar to me, my hand here on this table real enough, all of me real enough if one doesn't look too closely.

Do I appear to be a man, the man said in the hotel bar at three o'clock in the afternoon to the pretty girl who had no particular place to go, who doesn't know what's wrong with him, of a man who privately thinks his life has come to some sort of an end?

I assume I don't.

I assume that in any mirror, or in the eyes I happen to encounter, say on an afternoon like this, in such an hotel, in such a bar, across the table like this, I appear to be someone who apparently knows where he's going...

A couple from Edgar Allen Poe

Nobody can set a scene and/or mood like my man Edgar. Here are the opening sentences from “The Fall of the House of Usher.”


During the whole of a dull, dark, and soundless day in the autumn of the year, when the clouds hung oppressively low in the heavens, I had been passing alone, on horseback, through a singularly dreary tract of country; and at length found myself, as the shades of the evening drew on, within view of the melancholy House of Usher. I know not how it was -- but, with the first glimpse of the building, a sense of insufferable gloom pervaded my spirit.


And the finale of “The Masque of the Red Death”


He had come like a thief in the night. And one by one dropped the revellers in the blood-bedewed halls of their revel, and died each in the despairing posture of his fall. And the life of the ebony clock went out with that of the last of the gay. And the flames of the tripods expired. And Darkness and Decay and the Red Death held illimitable dominion over all.


Don’t you love the long line of “illimitable dominion” coming after the staccato alliteration of “Darkness and Decay and the Red Death”? Read it out loud. It's marvelous.

mf

“I know that, in spite of the poets, youth is not the happiest season"

Re: A couple from Edgar Allen Poe

I agree. Poe's influence still resonates.

"The thousand injuries of Fortunato I had borne as I best could, but when he ventured upon insult I vowed revenge."

Re: Examples of Great Prose.

"I never dared be radical when young,
For fear it would make me conservative when old."
-Robert Frost

Re: Examples of Great Prose.

The epic Icelandic Prose Eda of Snuri Sturleson...

Re: Examples of Great Prose.

My favourite section of Proust's novel. I am not very proficient in French, so I have read Gunnel Walquist's translation into Swedish.


- - - Mes promenades de cet automne-là furent d’autant plus agréables que je les faisais après de longues heures passées sur un livre. Quand j’étais fatigué d’avoir lu toute la matinée dans la salle, jetant mon plaid sur mes épaules, je sortais: mon corps obligé depuis longtemps de garder l’immobilité, mais qui s’était chargé sur place d’animation et de vitesse accumulées, avait besoin ensuite, comme une toupie qu’on lâche, de les dépenser dans toutes les directions. Les murs des maisons, la haie de Tansonville, les arbres du bois de Roussainville, les buissons auxquels s’adosse Montjouvain, recevaient des coups de parapluie ou de canne, entendaient des cris joyeux, qui n’étaient, les uns et les autres, que des idées confuses qui m’exaltaient et qui n’ont pas atteint le repos dans la lumière, pour avoir préféré à un lent et difficile éclaircissement, le plaisir d’une dérivation plus aisée vers une issue immédiate. La plupart des prétendues traductions de ce que nous avons ressenti ne font ainsi que nous en débarrasser en le faisant sortir de nous sous une forme indistincte qui ne nous apprend pas à le connaître. Quand j’essaye de faire le compte de ce que je dois au côté de Méséglise, des humbles découvertes dont il fût le cadre fortuit ou le nécessaire inspirateur, je me rappelle que c’est, cet automne-là, dans une de ces promenades, près du talus broussailleux qui protège Montjouvain, que je fus frappé pour la première fois de ce désaccord entre nos impressions et leur expression habituelle. Après une heure de pluie et de vent contre lesquels j’avais lutté avec allégresse, comme j’arrivais au bord de la mare de Montjouvain devant une petite cahute recouverte en tuiles où le jardinier de M. Vinteuil serrait ses instruments de jardinage, le soleil venait de reparaître, et ses dorures lavées par l’averse reluisaient à neuf dans le ciel, sur les arbres, sur le mur de la cahute, sur son toit de tuile encore mouillé, à la crête duquel se promenait une poule. Le vent qui soufflait tirait horizontalement les herbes folles qui avaient poussé dans la paroi du mur, et les plumes de duvet de la poule, qui, les unes et les autres se laissaient filer au gré de son souffle jusqu’à l’extrémité de leur longueur, avec l’abandon de choses inertes et légères. Le toit de tuile faisait dans la mare, que le soleil rendait de nouveau réfléchissante, une marbrure rose, à laquelle je n’avais encore jamais fait attention. Et voyant sur l’eau et à la face du mur un pâle sourire répondre au sourire du ciel, je m’écriai dans mon enthousiasme en brandissant mon parapluie refermé: «Zut, zut, zut, zut.» Mais en même temps je sentis que mon devoir eût été de ne pas m’en tenir à ces mots opaques et de tâcher de voir plus clair dans mon ravissement.
- - - Et c’est à ce moment-là encore,— grâce à un paysan qui passait, l’air déjà d’être d’assez mauvaise humeur, qui le fut davantage quand il faillit recevoir mon parapluie dans la figure, et qui répondit sans chaleur à mes «beau temps, n’est-ce pas, il fait bon marcher»,— que j’appris que les mêmes émotions ne se produisent pas simultanément, dans un ordre préétabli, chez tous les hommes. Plus tard chaque fois qu’une lecture un peu longue m’avait mis en humeur de causer, le camarade à qui je brûlais d’adresser la parole venait justement de se livrer au plaisir de la conversation et désirait maintenant qu’on le laissât lire tranquille. Si je venais de penser à mes parents avec tendresse et de prendre les décisions les plus sages et les plus propres à leur faire plaisir, ils avaient employé le même temps à apprendre une peccadille que j’avais oubliée et qu’ils me reprochaient sévèrement au moment où je m’élançais vers eux pour les embrasser.
- - - Parfois à l’exaltation que me donnait la solitude, s’en ajoutait une autre que je ne savais pas en départager nettement, causée par le désir de voir surgir devant moi une paysanne, que je pourrais serrer dans mes bras. Né brusquement, et sans que j’eusse eu le temps de le rapporter exactement à sa cause, au milieu de pensées très différentes, le plaisir dont il était accompagné ne me semblait qu’un degré supérieur de celui qu’elles me donnaient. Je faisais un mérite de plus à tout ce qui était à ce moment-là dans mon esprit, au reflet rose du toit de tuile, aux herbes folles, au village de Roussainville où je désirais depuis longtemps aller, aux arbres de son bois, au clocher de son église, de cet émoi nouveau qui me les faisait seulement paraître plus désirables parce que je croyais que c’était eux qui le provoquaient, et qui semblait ne vouloir que me porter vers eux plus rapidement quand il enflait ma voile d’une brise puissante, inconnue et propice. Mais si ce désir qu’une femme apparût ajoutait pour moi aux charmes de la nature quelque chose de plus exaltant, les charmes de la nature, en retour, élargissaient ce que celui de la femme aurait eu de trop restreint. Il me semblait que la beauté des arbres c’était encore la sienne et que l’âme de ces horizons, du village de Roussainville, des livres que je lisais cette année-là, son baiser me la livrerait; et mon imagination reprenant des forces au contact de ma sensualité, ma sensualité se répandant dans tous les domaines de mon imagination, mon désir n’avait plus de limites. C’est qu’aussi,— comme il arrive dans ces moments de rêverie au milieu de la nature où l’action de l’habitude étant suspendue, nos notions abstraites des choses mises de côté, nous croyons d’une foi profonde, à l’originalité, à la vie individuelle du lieu où nous nous trouvons — la passante qu’appelait mon désir me semblait être non un exemplaire quelconque de ce type général: la femme, mais un produit nécessaire et naturel de ce sol. Car en ce temps-là tout ce qui n’était pas moi, la terre et les êtres, me paraissait plus précieux, plus important, doué d’une existence plus réelle que cela ne paraît aux hommes faits. Et la terre et les êtres je ne les séparais pas. J’avais le désir d’une paysanne de Méséglise ou de Roussainville, d’une pêcheuse de Balbec, comme j’avais le désir de Méséglise et de Balbec. Le plaisir qu’elles pouvaient me donner m’aurait paru moins vrai, je n’aurais plus cru en lui, si j’en avais modifié à ma guise les conditions. Connaître à Paris une pêcheuse de Balbec ou une paysanne de Méséglise c’eût été recevoir des coquillages que je n’aurais pas vus sur la plage, une fougère que je n’aurais pas trouvée dans les bois, c’eût été retrancher au plaisir que la femme me donnerait tous ceux au milieu desquels l’avait enveloppée mon imagination. Mais errer ainsi dans les bois de Roussainville sans une paysanne à embrasser, c’était ne pas connaître de ces bois le trésor caché, la beauté profonde. Cette fille que je ne voyais que criblée de feuillages, elle était elle-même pour moi comme une plante locale d’une espèce plus élevée seulement que les autres et dont la structure permet d’approcher de plus près qu’en elles, la saveur profonde du pays. Je pouvais d’autant plus facilement le croire (et que les caresses par lesquelles elle m’y ferait parvenir, seraient aussi d’une sorte particulière et dont je n’aurais pas pu connaître le plaisir par une autre qu’elle), que j’étais pour longtemps encore à l’âge où on ne l’a pas encore abstrait ce plaisir de la possession des femmes différentes avec lesquelles on l’a goûté, où on ne l’a pas réduit à une notion générale qui les fait considérer dès lors comme les instruments interchangeables d’un plaisir toujours identique. Il n’existe même pas, isolé, séparé et formulé dans l’esprit, comme le but qu’on poursuit en s’approchant d’une femme, comme la cause du trouble préalable qu’on ressent. A peine y songe-t-on comme à un plaisir qu’on aura; plutôt, on l’appelle son charme à elle; car on ne pense pas à soi, on ne pense qu’à sortir de soi. Obscurément attendu, immanent et caché, il porte seulement à un tel paroxysme au moment où il s’accomplit, les autres plaisirs que nous causent les doux regards, les baisers de celle qui est auprès de nous, qu’il nous apparaît surtout à nous-même comme une sorte de transport de notre reconnaissance pour la bonté de cœur de notre compagne et pour sa touchante prédilection à notre égard que nous mesurons aux bienfaits, au bonheur dont elle nous comble.
- - - Hélas, c’était en vain que j’implorais le donjon de Roussainville, que je lui demandais de faire venir auprès de moi quelque enfant de son village, comme au seul confident que j’avais eu de mes premiers désirs, quand au haut de notre maison de Combray, dans le petit cabinet sentant l’iris, je ne voyais que sa tour au milieu du carreau de la fenêtre entr’ouverte, pendant qu’avec les hésitations héroïques du voyageur qui entreprend une exploration ou du désespéré qui se suicide, défaillant, je me frayais en moi-même une route inconnue et que je croyais mortelle, jusqu’au moment où une trace naturelle comme celle d’un colimaçon s’ajoutait aux feuilles du cassis sauvage qui se penchaient jusqu’à moi. En vain je le suppliais maintenant. En vain, tenant l’étendue dans le champ de ma vision, je la drainais de mes regards qui eussent voulu en ramener une femme. Je pouvais aller jusqu’au porche de Saint-André-des-Champs; jamais ne s’y trouvait la paysanne que je n’eusse pas manqué d’y rencontrer si j’avais été avec mon grand-père et dans l’impossibilité de lier conversation avec elle. Je fixais indéfiniment le tronc d’un arbre lointain, de derrière lequel elle allait surgir et venir à moi; l’horizon scruté restait désert, la nuit tombait, c’était sans espoir que mon attention s’attachait, comme pour aspirer les créatures qu’ils pouvaient recéler, à ce sol stérile, à cette terre épuisée; et ce n’était plus d’allégresse, c’était de rage que je frappais les arbres du bois de Roussainville d’entre lesquels ne sortait pas plus d’êtres vivants que s’ils eussent été des arbres peints sur la toile d’un panorama, quand, ne pouvant me résigner à rentrer à la maison avant d’avoir serré dans mes bras la femme que j’avais tant désirée, j’étais pourtant obligé de reprendre le chemin de Combray en m’avouant à moi-même qu’était de moins en moins probable le hasard qui l’eût mise sur mon chemin. Et s’y fût-elle trouvée, d’ailleurs, eussé-je osé lui parler? Il me semblait qu’elle m’eût considéré comme un fou; je cessais de croire partagés par d’autres êtres, de croire vrais en dehors de moi les désirs que je formais pendant ces promenades et qui ne se réalisaient pas. Ils ne m’apparaissaient plus que comme les créations purement subjectives, impuissantes, illusoires, de mon tempérament. Ils n’avaient plus de lien avec la nature, avec la réalité qui dès lors perdait tout charme et toute signification et n’était plus à ma vie qu’un cadre conventionnel comme l’est à la fiction d’un roman le wagon sur la banquette duquel le voyageur le lit pour tuer le temps.

Re: Examples of Great Prose.

Is this the entire novel or only an excerpt?
Top